Jump to content

2 for the price of 1!


jimothy
 Share

Recommended Posts

hi there.

was wandering through a local garden centre (looking for something as mundane as plant labels, would you believe :wink:), when i spotted this:

2007_0422(001).JPG

It was (predictably) labelled as alata, but even I know enough about neps to recognise that it wasn't this or, indeed, ventrata, so i bought it anyway, as i thought it was quite attractive, and spotted two growth points in there.

I also noticed what i thought were two different shades of pitchers on the plant, but put this down to changes in light level when the pitchers were forming:

2007_0422(002).JPG

2007_0422(003).JPG

On getting the plant home, and washing the soggy peat off the roots, I found that it was actually two plants in the same pot, and that the lighter and darker shade pitchers belonged to separate plants, so it looks like it may be two seed-grown plants that got potted up together accidentally.

2007_0422(005).JPG

What's more the lighter plant has two small basal offshoots and the darker has one as well, so I think i did pretty well on the whole.

What would be better would be if any of you lovely people could help to identify the species (or suggest candidates for parentage if it looks like a hybrid).[/img]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's Nepenthes rafflesiana. Looks nice. I don't think that two plants were potted together accidentally; Nepenthes often produce off shoots on the stem. Although, re-reading your post, they were probably just planted together, like you said, but via tissue culture, not seeds.

Whoa jeez, you're fast, Albino!

-Ben

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's Nepenthes rafflesiana....they were probably just planted together, like you said, but via tissue culture, not seeds.

Thanks both for the ID - my reason for suggesting seed-grown was the variation between the two plants. I was under the impression that tissue-cultured plants would be identical clones? Given that these plants have obviously been subject to exactly the same environment, soil, etc, I would have thought that the different colour pitchers suggested slight genetic variation?

Maybe I'm wrong about TC - i never really got to grips with the whole concept.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Its a Coccinea (rafflesiana*ampullaria)*mirabilis

DAMN! I thought for a minute there that we'd got a concensus going on - I should have known better.

Seriously though, thanks for the input, Manders.

I also couldn't help noticing that the pitchers are almost identical to that posted as x hookeriana in the competition thread...

I guess this is going to be another case of "we'll never be sure", huh?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest jf990224
It's Nepenthes rafflesiana.

-Ben

Its a Coccinea (rafflesiana*ampullaria)*mirabilis

For me, it s clear : it is nepenthes x hookeriana (ampullaria*rafflesiana) !

:wink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've just bought an exact look-alike at my local garden centre. It was labelled as N. hookeriana and for once looks like some accurate labelling.

I'm attempting it as a windowsill nep as I just haven't got anywhere else for it and couldn't resist buying one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to agree with manders, looks like x coccinea (at least, the red pitchered plant is - maybe two different hybrids in one pot??). coccinea is another hybrid which is occasionally sold at garden centres:

http://www.forumcarnivore.org/album_pic.php?pic_id=1392

http://www.forumcarnivore.org/album_pic.php?pic_id=1394

(just thought i'd add that these aren't my photos, found them with bob z's photo finder)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

my reason for suggesting seed-grown was the variation between the two plants. I was under the impression that tissue-cultured plants would be identical clones? Given that these plants have obviously been subject to exactly the same environment, soil, etc, I would have thought that the different colour pitchers suggested slight genetic variation?

Maybe I'm wrong about TC - i never really got to grips with the whole concept.

Heh, I'm not good with hybrids...

True, but pitcher color in this case is only different because of the lighting that that pitcher received when it was forming. The coloration in that one plant is only different from the other plant because of the lighting that that pitcher received. Yes, tissue culture does make the same plants, but those still could have been made from different parents, and variation will exist in plants, but that dark pitcher is not at all different from that light pitcher. Color like that means nothing, unless proven that that lightly blotted pitcher formed in extremely bright sunlight.

-Ben

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hookeriana is funny. It seems like it can look like alot of things. Maybe because there are a number of different ampularias and rafflesianas. It does kinda look like a hookeriana. But considering that slight curve inwards on the pitcher, coccinea seems to be in the mix at least. Haha maybe it's hookeriana*coccinea?

Ah and the number of plants in the pot, they don't do that here with neps, but the flytraps they sell here sometimes have up to 10 in one tiny pot XD.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

it is x hookeriana for sure. search it on the net.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

pitcher color in this case is only different because of the lighting that that pitcher received when it was forming. .... Color like that means nothing, unless proven that that lightly blotted pitcher formed in extremely bright sunlight.

My point was that if light intensity was the cause of the different colours, the two color forms would be spread between the two plants. As every one of the light pitchers is on one plant, and every one of the dark pitchers is on the other plant, and the plants have been grown in the same pot (and therefore light) surely light intensity cannot be the cause.

[/i]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dear all,

here I post some pictures: rafflesiana nivea, pure rafflesiana, coccinea, and hookeriana. Let us compare :D

1. coccinea

2. hookeriana

3. another type of hookeriana

4. rafflesiana nivea

5. another type of rafflesiana

Hope I don't make a mistake to identify :D:D

bye

Onny :D

coccinea-1.jpg

hookeriana1-1.jpg

hookeriana.jpg

rafflesiana-nivea.jpg

rafflesiana.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I picked up a "Nepenthes Hybride" at my Garden Centre last year, In the one pot was what are clearly two distinctly different plants.

I believe that one is actually N.fusca and the other is N.maxima!! They are just producing new pitchers, so once open I will post pics.

The pot was in the "half dead" section for £5.99!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...