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P. gracilis blooming

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HI all,

I'm an enthusiast italian Pinguicula grower and i have one doubt to resolve:

My P. gracilis is in winter form and it start to blooming now.

In E. Partrat site i have read that this Pinguicula start to blooming in summer but seeing the photos it seems that his gracilis blooming with a winter rosettes.

Who is in wrong? me? my Pinguicula? or there is a mistake in E. Partrat site?(i'm sure that in wrong is me and my ping) i need to resolve this riddle....thank's a lot to all.

Giancarlo Carbone -Rome, Italy-

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hello fellow Ping fan! :lol: ,

I think Mexican Pings can bloom during both season, so you plant is not doing anyting wrong, I have several Pinguicula that is putting several flower stalks, I can't wait for them to bloom! 8)

venlig hilsen Bjørn i lille Norge

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My P. gracilis only ever bloom in winter. I think Eric has made an error in the text, because under a photo the caption reads 'Pinguicula gracilis flowering from winter rosettes'.

gracilis.jpg

Vic

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Ciao Giancarlo!

From the herbarium information I have, this species has been found in flower mostly in January and February, although there is one collection from April too. So Eric probably ahd a little typo error, that's all.

Ci vediamo,

Fernando

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Thank's a lot to all!

Following are some of my Pinguicula

This is the flower of my P. gracilis:

P_gracilis_flower.jpg

this is P. rotundiflora start to blooming:

P_rotundiflora.jpg

and P. esseriana with ancestral flower bud:

P_esseriana.jpg

Happy growing to all (and for Fernando happy discovering)

Giancarlo Carbone -Roma, Italy-

P.S. For Mr E. Partrat happy revision... :roll: (your site is for me like a bible for a cristian, excellent job!)

.

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Thanks for the notification of the mistake. I will correct it tonight.

This is really a typo error as I wrote on the photo presented in the website that the pictures were taken in january. P. gracilis is blooming from the winter rosette.

Cheers

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hmm...of topic but, can Pinguicula sp. Sierra Tamaulipas (syn. Pinguicula pilosa) flower with summer rosett, mine is about to flower , and I see in Oliver Gluch webpage (http://www.gluch.info/Haupttext_Pingu37.htm) that this species only flower from Winter rossetes... I did use a translate tool at google.com so it might be translated wrong ( as useally )

regards Bjørn

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P. sp. 'Sierra Tamaulipas' is very closely related to P. agnata and like this species, doesn't produce a tight, succulent rosette. In winter the leaves get smaller, but remain glandular, at least under my conditions.

My plants only start to flower in winter and are just pushing up their first flower buds too, they usually keep flowering well into spring.

Vic

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Hi, all

After collecting yet more Drosera gemmae from my glasshouse :roll:

I found that my P. gracilis has come into flower too. Along with my P. 'Tina', P. agnata, P. laueana, and P. esseriana.

Theres quite a little flower show going on, on the bottom shelves of my glasshouse.

:wavey:

Langy

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I regret to say that in the next years, the things won't be as clearer as we thought.

Fernando gave me a picture of a new species under description by Zamudio with :

Leaves of P. moranensis like and flowers of P. agnata like !

P_sp.jpg

P. pilosa is not yet a valid name because Hans Luhrs didn't publish it yet. I hope soo !

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P. pilosa is not yet a valid name because Hans Luhrs didn't publish it yet. I hope soo !

I know, that's why I put "syn" infront of it. Is that Ping in cultivation, I like Pinguicula agnata and species that look like it...

Norvegica

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P. agnata is also one of my favorite because it was my first Pinguicula in culture when I was younger . P. pilosa is also very amazing. This genus is fascinating and the number of new species far from being finished. See the exemple of Fernando around Tonala !

I have just received a publication of Pinguicula gypsophila by Casper as a synonym of Pinguicula vulgaris var. gypsophila but things are not finished...

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cool :roll: , another Pinguicula vulgaris form, what so special with this form of Pinguicula vulgaris

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Pinguicula gypsophila was described in 1841 by Wallroth from gypsum rocks in Germany. Its great similarity to P. vulgaris motivated many botanists to reject the specific status of the Gypsum race. Moreover, the four known classical stands have been destroyed to a great extend betwenn 1950 and 1970 by human (especially industrial) activities. The transfer of living rosettes in 1979 rescue the taxon from extinction.

What can I say :

The taxon has been permanently disputed. Its populations are ecologically and morphologically totally isolated. The distribution area is extremly restricted, it grows on gypsum, in an area known to be the Central European glacial refugial region.

The flowers are twice smaller and light blue to pink.

Casper put the hypothesis that it could be the beginning of a species transformation.

More studies DNA will be done in the future

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I haven't finished writing the postcard for last weekend's explorations, but will do so soon hopefully. Meanwhile, what's the story with this future P.pilosa? I've heard of it and it sounds similar to this P.sp.Tlanchinol, but P.pilosa is supposedly from Tamaulipas, right?

Fernando

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Nice to meet you online, Fernando :D

but P.pilosa is supposedly from Tamaulipas, right?

Yes, it is identical with P.sp."El Cabrito, Sierra de Tamaulipas". Sierra de Tamaulipas is a range within the state of Tamaulipas, as you might know since you're in Mexico now.

I'm looking forward to read your next postcard on the web.

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Fernando,

Postcard No. 5 was the best yet, as I'm stuck in foggy, cold, wet England your Postcards bring a little sunshine each week and I look forwards to each new one. Congratulations on the new species too, that must have been a thrilling start to the day :)

Perhaps the most fascinating aspect of your reports, from the point of view of a hobby grower, are the stage of growth at which the plants are currently at, in habitat. I grow most of the Mexican species in cultivation and my cultivated plants are almost all at the same stage of growth (summer vs winter growth, flowering or not, etc), so I must be getting something right!

Keep them coming

Cheers

Vic

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Hi guys,

Konnichiwa Napraforgo, nice to meet you too! :) Or did we meet in one of the CP meetings in Tokyo? I remember there was this one cultivator from Kyoto who had beautiful Pings, but don't remember his name. I'll never forget his P.moctezumae, the 1st I ever saw...

I wonder how similar are the future P.pilosa and my P.sp.Tlanchinol.... For those of you who have the former in cultivation, please tell me how they compare to my pics of P.sp.Tlanchinol.

Hey Vic, I like your picture of U.reniformis there!! It was truly a thrill to find that new species, even though tiny as it was. As for the growing season, people have been telling me this has been an exceptionally wet year, so maybe the plants are lasting a little more than normal.

Take Care,

Fernando

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Hey guys, one more thing. I can't stop thinking about the similarities between a large flower of P.crenatiloba I found and those of P.gracilis and P.immaculata, down to the purplish column(?) inside the throat. In fact this purple column is also present in the new species P.sp.Tonala and in P.takakii.

Hey Eric, I really enjoyed what you did comparing the flowers of P.takakii and P.lilacina!! Maybe something similar can be done with P.crenatiloba and P.sp.Tonala, or with P.gracilia, P.immaculata. Or between P.takakii and P.sp.Tonala. Or with all of them!!! :):)

Fernando

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Fernando,

Oliver Gluch has pictures of P. sp. 'Sierra de Taumalapas' on his website. Described simply, the plants are very like a hairy P. agnata. The flowers of all the plants I've seen in cultivation look like his, but that could be because we are all growing the same clone, rather than the true situation in nature

Have you a link to a picture of P.sp. 'Tlanchinol'? I don't recall the name from the postcards.

Vic

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Bom dia, Fernando

I've met you a long time ago at Nippon Dental Univ.(Tokyo), but at that time P.moctezumae wasn't in cultivation in Japan nor I brought any Ping there;I remember asking you some questions over E.Fromm-Trinta. I hope you remember me, but you've got to meet many people there & then.....

At my windowsill P.sp."El Cabrito, Sierra de Tamaulipas" died out before it bore flower bud. An excellent cultivator in Kansai district grew the plant very well to set many flowers. Below is the page of his clone;both of two pictures were taken by me.

http://www1.plala.or.jp/Napraforgo/picts/L..._Tamaulipas.htm

The plant had more succulent leaves than P.agnata and even than the clone you can see in Oliver's page. Flower was apparently larger with wider corolla lobes. P.sp.Tlanchinol is apparently different from P.sp."El Cabrito, Sierra de Tamaulipas" with wider, less succulent summer leaves, and flower with slender corolla lobes.

I hope these informations are helpful to you.

Common feature of purplish column(?) suggest a common pollinator for these species. A kind of minute insect(ex. male mosquito) might visit the flowers.

P.crenatiloba, P.gracilis and P.immaculata compose, with P.clivorum(P.barbata) and P.emarginata, section Temnoceras in the subgenus Temnoceras. P.gracilis and P.immaculata, however, differ from other three species for their heterophyllous life cycle and distinctly large central lobe of lower corolla, so if subsectional subclassification is applied on section Temnoceras it should be divided into two subsections.

Cheers,

Napraforgo

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Here is another picture. The flower varie from light purple on the petal to white like the one on the picture (there are variations as igual as for the flowers of Pinguicula agnata).

Pinguicula%20pilosa%20flower.JPG

And for the rosette (really hairy), have a look on Oliver Gluch's famous Pinguicula web site

Oliver's Page

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