Grafting question


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hey are there nepenthes that are very difficult to root with ?

just wondering with grafting nepenthes

if i take a cutting of n. rajah and graft it onto a stock n.redleopard, wouold the growing point of the rajah produce rajah pitchers? would growth rate be altered any way?

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I've separated your post from the FAQ Air-Layering thread and made it into a new thread in the Nepenthes forum.

Grafting of Nepenthes is possible though it doesn't appear to be common practice.

wouold the growing point of the rajah produce rajah pitchers?

Yes, if the graft were successful.

would growth rate be altered any way?

Perhaps, though "Red Leopard" may not be a suitable stock plant for N. rajah.

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The trouble with nepenthes grafting is that their stem structure is that of a typical monocot.

This means that the vascular bundles of the plant are scattered randomnly{more or less} through the stem and not in rings like dicots. The problem with this structure is that it makes grafting very difficult!

To take a successful graft you need to basically give the grafted tip of the plant a source of water and the roots on the bottom of the graft a supply of the sugars produced by photosynthesis in the leaves. This requires you to pretty closely match up the vascular bundles in the stem so that they can heal together and continue to flow relatively uninterupted.

As the vascular bundles of nepenthes{like most creepers} are randomnly scattered in the stem you cant really line them up and effect an uninterupted flow of water/foods. Without it the new graft will die from lack of water while the roots languish from lack of the sugars from the leaves! If you could match it all up{which is possible} then nepenthes grafts would work, thats difficlt though so its not often attempted!

Grafting is best left for plants that produce wood! Because they are easiest due to their dicot design!

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grafting has been successful and a member on terra forums had a picture to prove it...hes sorta disapeared though and his picture is gone.... i would think it would only be possible with similar nepenthes like inermis and dubia....lowii and eppipiata, fusca and maxima...ventricosa and burkei(sp?) thats the only way i think grafting would work. somthing like rajah and ventricosa wouldnt work because you have a very easy nep and a little more difficult one, one grows fast one doesnt etc.

Alex

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I can't see any real advantage to doing it though

In theory a slow growing plant may be grafted to a vigorous rootstock resulting in faster growth. Or perhaps a highland plant could be grafted to lowland rootstock to give a plant tolerant of a wider range of growing conditions. Whether it works or not is another matter...

i see that its a dead ventrata stem...but what if it still had growth on the top of it...

Alex

When grafting it is standard practice to remove all growth points from the stock plant. Otherwise, the stock plant will grow in preference to the scion. Once a graft has taken, the stock plant may still form new growth points from dormant buds and these are removed for the same reason.

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Guest cdstriker

The concensus from members in the pitcher-plants forum is that a highland species grafted onto a lowland species rootstock probably wouldn't result in you being able to grow the plant in lowland conditions. That's what got me excited about it. I personally wouldn't want to risk one of my plants.

Chris

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When grafting it is standard practice to remove all growth points from the stock plant. Otherwise, the stock plant will grow in preference to the scion. Once a graft has taken, the stock plant may still form new growth points from dormant buds and these are removed for the same reason.

Yes Aidan, i have removed all growth points from the N. x 'Ventrata'. When the graft grow together with root stock, N. x 'Ventrata' stopped production of new growth points ( because apical dominance has been restored ).

i am sorry for my english

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