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Jonathan

Sulawesi Neps Part Three - save the best till last....

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Thanks for the interest and input on

A few extra points:

1. There were several plants, all identical in form, growing within a few m2 of each other. After I expressed interest in the plants, someone in the group mentioned casually that they had seen some colourful Neps further back up the jeep track (how helpful on the last day in that area!) They couldn't comment on shape, form etc other than to say they were different to this one!

2. The only other species seen nearby was N. maxima which grew about 10 feet away on the opposite side of the track.

3. One plant was in flower - very typical Nep flowers (male). To my shame, I didn't take any pictures as I was under severe time pressure from the remainder of the group who were waiting in the jeep to yomp off for Sulawesi Hawk-Eagle...

4. There were no lower pitchers or rosettes on this plant although the second plant 9with a single lower pitcher of similar colouration) on thread 2 grew opposite on a chopped vine and may be of relevance? All plants of this form were scrambling through ferns along the track.

Neps are really not my strongpoint so all info gratefully received. I assumed naively that a few pics would be sufficient to identify the plant, given the limited options on Sulawesi, especially given the distinctive shape of the pitchers and the glabrata-like colouring.

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Thanks for the that Jonathan, it clears some things up. As far as flowers, it would've been useful to have pics but your memory may serve just as well; was it raceme-like (a main stalk with single or double flowers on short pedicels) or panicle-like (flowers on branched secondary inflorescences throughout (Clarke, 1997)? Just to make things a little easier: http://www.m-w.com/mw/art/inflores.htm

I'll have to take another look at thread 2, i completely forgot about that one!

Cheers!

Amori

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Those birds seriously look like they're plotting something but decide to procrastinate..

:rock:

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Dear Nepenth-o-philes,

If you look at this photo from Gunung Lumut: http://www.heliamphora.de/images/asien19911851.jpg

you can see both N. eymae (bottom right) and N. glabrata (upper left) growing together. If they were to hybridize, I rather doubt the upper pitchers would be so colorful. Johnathan, do you have a name for the general area where these plants were found? Was it on a mountain?

The stems and leaves are very close to those of N. glabrata, but larger/or more robust. This species/something looks rather like what I would expect if N. glabrata was hybridized with N. paniculata (which is not know from Sulawesi)... So that probably makes this a close relative of N. glabrata.

Sincerely,

Dave Evans

that doesnt look like eyame! wow...ive never seen somthing like it! we need an expert in here to state what it is!!

Alex

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For those interested, this is indeed a new taxon and has been described as such following further work in Sulawesi. I'm trying to get a copy of the paper in the meantime.

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Hi Jonathan,

Thanks for the news.

Where has it been published?

Cheers,

Fran├žois.

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Great News! Congratulations..............something many of us could only dream of. Has the plant been named yet?

Regards Neil

Edited by Neil Cornish

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wait a sec...I thought N. pitopangii survived as only a single male plant in the wild which Stewart had found. Is this a different location??

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Nope, this is the one and only known plant of its kind.

This thread is the recording of its discovery. Rather cool, huh?

BTW Jonathan, those bird do look awesome. I'm not much of a birder, but I do enjoy looking at them.

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.... if this site is indeed the same site that Stewart visited and there is only one plant remaining, who in the hell has been and taken all the other plants between 2006 and 2008? I havent seen Jonathan post for sometime but it would be interesting to find out who (if anyone) Jonathan did reveal the coordinates to or whether they have used the information given about the nightjars strongholds to find the plants.

Edited by Simon Lumb

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Dear Simon,

There has only been one plant found, ever. It is male.

Some folks visited the plant and removed parts of it. Perhaps they took samples to grow or to make herbarium specimens so it could be named.

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Hmmm, this is all new information to me. I didn't know the plant had been featured in Stewart's book or that a name had been chosen to honour the herbarium botanist. It isn't every day you discover a new species of Nepenthes and more communication would have been nice

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Hi Jonathan,

I am sorry that I neglected to send you free copies of my recent works on Nepenthes. I did promise this, and have overlooked it (I sent out about 50 copies to everyone that helped complete the work, and sorry I missed you out).

My sincere apologiies, could you please pm me your postal address, and I will send you copies immediately.

Chi'ens description of the species has been published. Although I have not yet seen it or recieved the final PDF of the paper yet. As soon as I do, I will send this to you as well.

Again, I am sorry for this mistake, but will rectify it!

Best regards to you and all on the CPUK forum

Stew

Edited by stewart

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Chi'ens description of the species has been published. Although I have not yet seen it or recieved the final PDF of the paper yet. As soon as I do, I will send this to you as well.

Stew

Great news Stewart!

I can't wait to read it.

Congratuations to Ch'ien!

Cheers,

Fran├žois.

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Hi Jonathan,

I am sorry that I neglected to send you free copies of my recent works on Nepenthes. I did promise this, and have overlooked it (I sent out about 50 copies to everyone that helped complete the work, and sorry I missed you out).

My sincere apologiies, could you please pm me your postal address, and I will send you copies immediately.

Chi'ens description of the species has been published. Although I have not yet seen it or recieved the final PDF of the paper yet. As soon as I do, I will send this to you as well.

Again, I am sorry for this mistake, but will rectify it!

Best regards to you and all on the CPUK forum

Stew

Are you able to say where it will be published?

LeeB.

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Chi'ens description of the species has been published. Although I have not yet seen it or recieved the final PDF of the paper yet.

Does anyone have a citation of this publication? I can find no reference anywhere.

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Hi guys,

It was published in the Singapore Gardens Bulletin Vol. 61(1).

I too appologise Jonathan. I did miss you reply to my original email when you returned from Africa. Unfortunately I am extremely busy and had no intention of keeping you out of the loop. I just simply got caught up in other projects like the ICPS conference etc. and forgot.

I must point out however that although the species would have remained undescribed today had you not provided the information to us to locate it, it was originally discovered and collected by Mr Pitopang.

I do have some overprints left from the Bulletin which I can post to you. Please PM your address.

When we revisited the site the plant was in fantastic condition and quite large. On the second visit when Ch'ien and Stewart went back the plant had been destroyed by collectors! Cuttings had been taken and lots of them. This is extremely frustrating!

The same had occured on a recent visit to the Hose mountains where N. platychilla had been removed from a site where there was once lots of it! Not many have been to the Hose in the last 12 months.

Please, just please let me catch the poachers in the jungle one day!

Kindest Regards

Greg

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