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Sean Spence

Drosera glanduligera and native orchids.

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I've made a couple of visits to a local National Park over the past 2 weekends in search of CPs and native terrestrial orchids. The beauty of these 2 groups of plants is that they exist in the same areas. So, I get the chance to see my 2 favourite groups of plants growing side-by-side on most of my trips.

The area was severely affected by bushfires last summer, resulting in the deaths of a number of people and the reinvigoration of a habitat that hadn't seen a major fire in several decades. The result was one of the best ever seasons for both CPs and orchids, many of which will only flower after such an event.

Anyway, here are a series of shots mainly featuring the native orchids. CPs that grow here include D. peltata var. peltata, D. peltata var. foliosa, D. auriculata, D. whittakerii ssp. aberrans and D. glanduligera. I didn't bother taking photos of most of these as I have on countless occasions in the past. Instead it was the orchids that I paid most attention to, along with a few flowering plants of D. glanduligera.

Firstly a shot of the habitat. All of the plants shown grew along this dirt roadside-

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Starting with the CPs, Drosera glanduligera in flower followed by a small colony of immature plants-

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Sorry, but that's all for the CPs. Next up is a couple of the aptly named Spider orchids-

Caladenia clavigera, the Clubbed Spider orchid-

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Caladenia tentaculata, the Mantis Spider orchid-

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A couple of other members of the same family,

Caladenia carnea, Pink Fairies-

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Caladenia pusilla, Dwarf Pink Fairies. The flower on this one is only about 10mm across-

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Next group, the Donkey orchids, Diuris.

To start with, Diuris corymbosa, one of the Wallflower Donkey orchids-

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The smaller, Golden Moths, Diuris behrii-

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The Waxlip orchid, Glossodia major, typical purple colour-

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and the not uncommon white flowered version-

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The Greenhood group, beginning with the very common Pterostylis nutans, or Nodding Greenhood-

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Pterostylis concinna, the Trim Greenhood-

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A couple of the Tall Greenhood types-

Pterostylis smardagyna-

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and Pterostylis melogramma-

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The only species of Sun orchid Thelymitra that had an open flower- Thelymitra antennifera or Rabbits Ears. This genus only open their flowers on warm sunny days. I caught this one late in the day as it was getting darker. Consequently, the flowers were beginning to close-

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And finally, the main reason why I visited the area. The following plant only flowers after a fire. I have been seeing the leaves of this species for the past 20+ years in various locations across southern Australia but had never seen a single flower. I knew that I'd finally see it this year!

The aptly named Pyrorchis nigricans, Red Beaks-

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To finish up, a shot of one of the native Bulldog ants (no idea why they're called that!). This specimen was over an inch in length and scared the hell out of my daughter. Very interesting though-

ant1.JPG

Not a bad area to visit! Believe it or not, there are probably another 20-30 species found in this small area that had either finished flowering or were yet to flower. I'll be back in a few weeks to locate a few more.

Hope you enjoyed.

Sean.

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Fantastic looking orchid shots! :) Methinks a trip this weekend to get some more shots is in order for me!

Got any more? :)

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Got any more? :)

Only some older ones, but plenty of them.

I'll be visiting another National Park in a couple of weeks that is home to far more species than the area above. Will post photos of these and the abundant CPs when I return.

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Got any more? :)

Only some older ones, but plenty of them.

I'll be visiting another National Park in a couple of weeks that is home to far more species than the area above. Will post photos of these and the abundant CPs when I return.

Looking forward to it! :) I went for a trip last weekend and saw only two CP's and a whole bunch of orchids. Either way it didn't matter to me as they are both my hobbies. Also if anyone else is interested in seeing some more shots of various Australian native orchids, click here for some shots. :)

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Wow. the base of that red beak orchid (the Pyrorchis nigricans?) is REALLY interesting. Thanks for posting those!

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Hi Sean,

the flowering Drosera is superb! :tu:

Moritz

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Guest Sheila

You have some beautiful orchids in Australia. It's nice to see glanduligera growing in the wild as well and in flower too. Lovely pictures Sean :)

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Excellent photos ! I think the orchids are just as cool and fascinating as the dews.

Definitely! There is something strange and bizarre about many of the Australian terrestrial orchid species. I think it is that aspect that first attracted me too them. Many temporarily catch insects and remind me very much of CPs.

Actually after seeing all of the common tuberousDrosera in virtually every bushland location I visit every season, the orchids are usually of more interest to me as they are more varied and diverse in my part of the country.

Now if I were over in WA that would change completely.....

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Very nice photos! D. glanduligera is one of my favourite Droserae. And the orchids are beautiful! :D

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Australian Drosera are stunning for me, but also orchids from there are beautifull!!

Thanks Sean for share them with us!

Wonderfull photos as always

About the ant, its scientific name is Myrmecia, probably a Myrmecia gulosa

Bye

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Guest Sheila
Actually after seeing all of the common tuberousDrosera in virtually every bushland location I visit every season, the orchids are usually of more interest to me as they are more varied and diverse in my part of the country.

Oh to have tuberous sundews growing like weeds. You are so lucky :roll:

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With my greenhouse already full, Sean pulls a Sean and upsets my day. Again. Like always. I wish I never saw those orchid pictures.

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less orchids, more CP next time!!!! >;)

nice work sean

m

During my next trip in 2 weeks I'll try to split the time 50/50 :roll:

At least in the locvation I'll be visiting the CPs are more varied than what I'm used to , so almost all of the time will be devoted to them. Any orchid that should happen to occur in the same locations (which they invariably do) will be a bonus.

With my greenhouse already full, Sean pulls a Sean and upsets my day. Again. Like always. I wish I never saw those orchid pictures.

:D . I actually saw a few different species of native bees flying around the orchids, Pyrorchis in particular. I was trying to get some shots of them specifically for you Tim but the things were just too quick. At least the ant did the right thing by standing still for a second or two.

About the ant, it's scientific name is Myrmecia, probably a Myrmecia gulosa

Thanks for the ID Giancarlo.

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Hi Sean

I love these pictures, especially the orchids - the Pyrorchis nigricans! What a lick to find such a rarity!

I know from my own experience how difficult it is to get sharp close pictures of plants moving slightly in the wind outdoors - so again: great pictures!! Keep posting both!

Regards

Olivier

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Hi Sean,

While all of the time & effort to travel to these locations and locate the plants is probably a labor of love, taking the time to create great photos and then also come back and sort, resize & post them is an effort that we really appreciate (as evidenced by all of these responses!!)

Thanks for all your hard work, effort and time!! 890.gif

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