S.purpurea in the Lake District


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Oh My God They Are So Perfect When Growing In The Wild.. Amazing Pictures... i think cp's are most worth of seeing in the wild. it brings me a very calmed feeling

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Very debatable as to whether removing those seeds (or plants for that matter) would be a good thing or not.

I think it would be a GREAT idea! They may look good and appear harmless but, they don't belong there.

Turf em out, flog them off and use the proceeds for environmental conservation of The Lakes. :lol:

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Very debatable as to whether removing those seeds (or plants for that matter) would be a good thing or not.

I think it would be a GREAT idea! They may look good and appear harmless but, they don't belong there.

Turf em out, flog them off and use the proceeds for environmental conservation of The Lakes. :lol:

I agree!

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right or wrong; this is the stand that Adrian Slack planted out so I am led to believe. It is a secret location. Having been there myself, there is no danger of the plants spreading; they have been there since the 60s and is confined to this valley mire.

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The plants look good. I know they don't belong, but they didn't /choose/ to be there.

I know they never could/would have done it without the interference of humanity, but has it ocurred to anyone how widely spread purpurea has come to be on the globe?

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Hello all,

Unfashionable as it may be but I am unconvinced by the train of thought that says "its not natural therefore it should be removed".

On that basis, can I suggest removal of pheasants, little owls and rabbits (and watch ecosystems collapse when the rabbits are eradicated!!!)?

Can I ask what studies have been made that show that these plants are damaging the environment that they are living in?

Regards

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I sort of agree with blueflytap. I mean.. what other sarracenia that are native to the UK could hybridize with or compete with them? None.

I know it's good to keep indigenous plants but sometimes it's good to have the odd bit of diversity as long as it doesn't cause damage, which these plants aren't.

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Guest Aidan

Historically there are any number of introduced species and that number is increasing all the time. Like it or not they are by their very nature damaging to indigenous organisms, simply because they compete. Australia, New Zealand, Hawaii, Guam and others are examples of what happens when introduced flora/fauna gets out of hand.

I'd gladly dispose of rabbits and grey squirrels.

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Everything that is introduced will, probably, have an effect on native flora and fauna.

Grey Squirrels have pushed the Red to the brink of extinction. Rabbits, though living a different lifestyle, have impacted on the native Hare.

True, Pheasants and Doremice have had little impact, the fomer because they are hunted routinely, the latter because they breed so poorly.

Let us increase the natural biodiversity in the wild and keep the foreigners in our gardens (plants that is not tourists... then again, living near a beach....)

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pheasants are a real pest. the release pens destroy native flora, and the birds themselves are omnivorous, hoovering up anything they find from seeds to rare invertebrates and mice, so have a big impact on local biodiversity. around here they are released by the tens of thousands....I would love to see pheasant releases banned, and they hardly breed by themselves so would soon die out.

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if they are growing in a diffrent zone to the other cps its alright as they wont run them out because they like diffrent habitats.besides it takes the seven years to seed so it will double in size every seven years. and when it gets out of hand people could destroy flower heads or destroys the plants them selves

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Historically there are any number of introduced species and that number is increasing all the time. Like it or not they are by their very nature damaging to indigenous organisms, simply because they compete. Australia, New Zealand, Hawaii, Guam and others are examples of what happens when introduced flora/fauna gets out of hand.

I'd gladly dispose of rabbits and grey squirrels.

Hmmm.. I cannot disagree that there are planet-wide incidences of damage caused by introduced species . However in this particular case what damage are these plants doing? Have there been any particular studies done on what these plants are crowding out or eating?

If Mike is correct then this stand has been here for 30-odd years and whilst they have multiplied, they have not exactly been a runaway success!

I know what you mean about the squirrels, but I wouldn't want to see Rabbits disappear from these shores. Despite the damage that they cause, I think that they are now a part of the British ecosystem and are (amongst other things) a valuable prey animal.

BTW Many thanks for the photo's.

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