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chloroplast

drosophyllum-slack potting

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Hello,

I just acquired a small drosophyllum (in 4" clay pot) and slack potted it. The smaller pot has some sphagnum moss in the drain hole to "wick" water into the smaller pot.

My questions are:

How on earth is the plant supposed to push its roots into the larger pot through the small, partially obstructed drain hole of the inner pot?

Has anyone contemplated removing the entire bottom of the small pot (or enlarge the drain hole) with a masonry drill bit to allow more room for the roots to grow through?

Any info/advice would be appreciated. Thanks.

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Don't quote me on this because I'm by far an expert on them. But I don't think the Drosophyllum is meant to push its roots out of the smaller pot, into the larger one. You should choose a big enough clay pot for its roots to spread in the sand/peat mix. They don't like their roots to be wet, thats why porous pots are used. Water can diffuse through the pot and dampen the sand - not making it wet. The wick is used for the same purpose, and to stop excess water directly moving up the drain hole. Hope this helps.

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maybe im doin this wrong but mine is over a year old,about 9" tall,had plenty of seed off it and is just potted in an 8" clay pot in approx 40%peat 60% silver sand mix.i water it very sparingly maybe once a week.touch wood its doin ok.

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Guest Sheila

Slack potting is not absolutely necessary so the way you are keeping your plant Zooman is fine. I kept one in a 12" clay pot which was not slack potted a couple of years ago, It grew to a massive size but died after dosing it with provado. The one I have now is only in a 4" clay pot, still not slack potted, it is growing well and has flowered for the second time but is probably only a quarter of the size of the plant I originally had in the 12" pot, so it seems to me that the more a plant can spread its roots the bigger it eventually gets.

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thanx for that sheila,think i will try a bigger pot if any of the latest seed germinates and test ur theory(gorra feelin ur right!)

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Several years ago I experimented with growing Drosophyllum in different sizes and types of pots. The plant in a 4-inch plastic pot survived for 3 years, flowered, and set seed, but never got larger than about 6 inches. The largest and best plants were in a 12-inch unglazed clay pot. I did not try pots larger than 12-inches, but I think the larger the pot the better.

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have just got another seedling come up so im gonna try it in at least a 12" unglazed clay and see if there is any difference in how big it grows etc.just gonna wait a few days till its abit bigger and safer to prick it out and pot up.

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Thank you all for the helpful information; I appreciate it.

Seems that when it comes to drosophyllum pots, "bigger is better!" :D:D

Thanks again.

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