Sign in to follow this  
elgecko

Pine Barren 06 Trip Pictures - 56K warning

Recommended Posts

My camp site

camp.jpg

Fence Lizard

flizard.jpg

Some kind of Iris

flower.jpg

Some Kind of Orchid

orchid.jpg

Some shots of the landscape

area1.jpg

area2.jpg

area3.jpg

area4.jpg

I did not do as much canoeing as I planned. It was very windy. Friday there was white caps on the lake it was blowing so hard. It was still very windy on Saturday morning, but I still went out.

Getting a little narrow

can1.jpg

DUCK!!

can2.jpg

can3.jpg

can4.jpg

Utricularia inflata

U.jpg

U1.jpg

Sarracenia Purpurea

purp1.jpg

purp2.jpg

purp3.jpg

purp4.jpg

Drosera rotundiflora

rot1.jpg

rot2.jpg

rot3.jpg

Drosera intermedia – The most common sundew of the sites I searched

inter1.jpg

inter2.jpg

inter3.jpg

inter4.jpg

Drosera filiformis – Still the most elusive sundew in the Pine Barrens. I have only found this plant growing in one small area and counted less then 10 plants.

Dfil1.jpg

Dfil.jpg

I was glad to meet a new person from the forums on Sunday. I think Ron Lane, and I know I did, had a great time getting our feet wet and getting lost down the sand roads in the Pine Barrens.

Hope you enjoy the pictures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Aidan

Looks like you had an enjoyable trip.

I like the D. rotundifolia growing in moss on the tree trunk. I guess it got there from seed floating in the water.

The D. intermedia is also interesting in that it has formed stems. I've not seen that growth habit here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice images. The lady slipper orchid is Cypripedium acaule. It's one of the more common and hardy of the lady slippers. Did you see very many throughout the park? I'm also interested in another orchid that occurs in the barrens called, Arethusa bulbosa. Did you by chance see it?

www.botany.wisc.edu/orchids/Arethusa.html

Thanks, Stefan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello elgecko :D !

Thanks for the pictures. It was much appreciated.

The Cypripedium is a wonderful plant.

Friendly,

François.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, to be able to canoe in such a beutiful place and see so many fine examples of carnivorous natives! And those rotundifolia's up that tree trunk! Now who said any moss other than Sphagnum kills CP's!?

Very nice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Andreas Eils

My dear Mister singing association!!!* :mrgreen:

:shock:

That simply makes me jealous! What a lovely place for dreaming...

(dreaming with open eyes of course). Thanx for letting us join your tour a little! :D

(I wanna get out of here!!!) ](*,)

Andreas

*silly literal translation of a German expression for something that makes you speechless! :mrgreen:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great trip and wonderful pics I´m very happy to see my favourite U. inflata

in nature :shock:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fantastic pictures, looks like a great place to visit. I hope that some of the sites in Maryland and Virginia that I've visiting on the ICPS Conference excursions come close, you've really whet my appetite for seeing US CPs in habitat, thanks.

Cheers

Vic

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was only able to make it down to do some tromping around with Steve for one day - but it was a great day.

Some thoughts/observations:

- meeting another CP person and forum member was great - Thanks for inviting me on the trip Steve - sorry I couldn't make it for more than 1 day.

- obviously seeing the CP in their natural habitat is great - very educational - how can you beat seeing the plants where they choose to grow? (vs where we happen to plant them). Some of my observations agree with prior habitat visits and some are distinctly different...

- seeing the consistent separation of D. rotundifolia & D. intermedia into their respective micro-habitats was intriguing. Even though the separation were typically only a few feet to a few inches - the D. rotundifolia always preferred the drier ground and the D. intermedia the wetter/muckier growing area. IIRC - this was even consistent on a stump sticking out of the water. The D. rotundifolia grew above the D. intermedia. Also, as close as the plants grow, we noticed no hybrids.

- While the D. intermedia loving the wetter/muckier growing areas was consistent w/ what I've observed previously - huge bogs in NE PA have D. rotundifolia growing in the sphagnum - in very wet areas...

- Similarly - I've seen S. purpurea seemingly prefer the wet areas in deep shagnum in other northern bogs. Here, the S. purpurea plants 'seemed' to prefer higher ground in the cover of low bushes. Although, we found a number of plants that were growing in the sphagnum, there were more in the bushes and those tended to be larger (go figure!)

- Previously I've found D. filiformis growing in low, flat, sandy areas. We didn't find any areas like that so I wasn't hugely surprised that we didn't find lots of them.

- Seeing actual plants of U. inflata was great. While the plants we saw were in pretty 'rugged' condition - several were flowering. The shape of the plant is truly unique and intriguing...

- We also saw some of the 'usual' string-type aquatic bladderwarts (sorry - no clue to species). These plants were very successful as they were quite common and close inspection of the traps showed many to have prey inside.

- Steve took some TDS and pH readings of water in the area. The pH readings were amazingly low (below 5?) and I was surprised that fish and plants could live in the water...

- Ticks - no real surprise that we had some crawling on us. Pleasantly not as many as I normally get in areas closer to my house in central NJ. Two of the ticks that we inspected a bit closer than others were both Lone Star ticks vs Deer ticks or Dog ticks (my apologies if these aren't the official names). Having looked at hundreds (maybe thousands) of ticks - these were only the 2nd & 3rd Lone Star ticks I've seen...

- Seeing the Pink Lady slipper orchid was great. It was in perfect condition and incredibly beautiful - big credit to Steve's sharp eyes for finding it. We were also able to look at several other much smaller blooming orchids at different locations.

- the various Fence Lizards were also very interesting to watch scamper around.

- The campground where we met (Atsion) had nice, large, flat campsites with a decent separation and significant brush providing some shielding from neighboring sites (so you didn't feel that your neighbors were constantly looking over your shoulder)

- I intend to go back and spend more time there - both in this campground and exploring the local area - truly a memorable experience 455.gif & highly recommended...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for the comments on the pics.

Ron,

Thanks for posting a nice detailed account of the time we spent observing the plants, and glad that you did make it for the day.

I know that you mentioned about going later in the season to see the different sundews blooming. D. intermedia blooms June to August and D. rotundifolia June to September. If you decide to back some time between the flowering times, maybe in July?, let me know and we can meet up again and get our feet wet while sinking in the sphagnum moss.

I did forget to mention I took some readings the pH and TDS of 2 locations. Both locations had a TDS reading of 26 PPM. Like Ron stated, my pH readings where 4.43 and 4.60, which I thought was extremely low.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for sharing the pics, you must have had a good time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm jealous of your little adventure ;)

Lovely pics :D

Me too! What about the chiggers?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The chiggers may be jealous as well. :) In my trips to the Pine Barrens, I've never gotten chiggers or ticks, but I'm beyond paranoid and shower myself with Deep Woods Off beforehand.... and take the easy route into the bog... by canoe or through the clearest path.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm jealous of your little adventure ;)

Lovely pics :D

Me too! What about the chiggers?

Jim,

I did not end up with any chigger bites this time.

Why did you not come down and join us? :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would you believe that I am now geographically closer to the folks from the Ontario Carnivorous Plant Society than anything in Amerrica?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fantastic photos - thanks for sharing! :D

The Iris (what species?) and Cypripedium acule are stunning too.

It's interesting to see the same CPs there that are also native here (except the U.inflata, and D.filiformis [i wish the latter was a UK native!]), and the similarities, but also differences, in the habitats. Very informative, thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
..my pH readings where 4.43 and 4.60, which I thought was extremely low.

Peat bogs can get as low as pH 3 due to the acidifying effect of Sphagnum.

Regards,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this