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Amorphophallus & Chinosol?


flycatchers
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Well as my ever decreasing collection succumb to rot (at least I am consistant!) I am looking at ways to avoid this in future. Do you think soaking either a new tuber/seed or indeed an affected one in Chinosol might help? Also using sulpher dust on the damaged tubers?

My latest victim is my favorite a beautiful Amorphophallus borneensis. This has had a lovely 29 inch tall leaf on it since September. This died back much more gradually than the others and is still attached to the tuber. So it seemed to be going dormant rather than dieing. But even so after careful investigation a sizable chunk of the tuber has rotted away and the stem where it goes into the tuber is partly mushy! I have yet to completely unpot it to fully view the tuber to see if the rest is ok, as I would really like to save it. But know that just as soon as water is added to the drying compost the whole tuber will cease to exist :wink: Just how the heck don't they all rot in the wild?? I could just give up growing them but the more I fail the more I want to suceed :wink: Its just a pity that Troy has given up the Amorphophallus business as getting hold of these seeds and tubers seems impossible at the moment- or very expensive!!

cheers

bill

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Well as my ever decreasing collection succumb to rot (at least I am consistant!) I am looking at ways to avoid this in future. Do you think soaking either a new tuber/seed or indeed an affected one in Chinosol might help? Also using sulpher dust on the damaged tubers?

bill

might help, sounds pretty far gone though :cry:

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Well on removing the tuber about a quarter of one side had gone. :cry:

I have cleaned that part up and coated it with sulpher dust and allowed to dry.

I am still not clear exactly what is the best compost but have used a mix of peat,sand, perlite and repotted. This time I have buried the tuber deeper as I have found that all the roots tend to be on the side or on the top of the tuber. As this type of compost or variations using orchid bark as well have all tended to rot the tubers can anyone suggest a better soil?

This particular plant overall had done the best, even now showing signs of new roots and a new leaf. But still suffering from this rot problem I just cannot get away from. This new leaf also was partly rotted :D

cheers

bill

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have you tried Trichoderma at all, to mop up all the pathogenic fungi...?

I have some of that and will certainly give it a try. Nothing to lose.. :D

cheers

bill

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