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Tyfone why cant you grow Highlanders?, i read in another thread that you open a window at night for another plant, why not do the same for a highlander. Several of mine grow very well in draughty windowsills.

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Well a cuple of reasons.

1. I live in a flat (hard to put a greenhouse up)

2. Limited space (cant put up an AC)

3. Dry air in my flat (60% RH With a humidifier, without about 30-40%)

4. Cant make temp drops. (I cant sleep in my room when its 15 C)

Thats why :twisted:

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1. I live in a flat (hard to put a greenhouse up)

2. Limited space (cant put up an AC)

3. Dry air in my flat (60% RH With a humidifier, without about 30-40%)

4. Cant make temp drops. (I cant sleep in my room when its 15 C)

I dont think any of those reasons should stop you trying, i've got 13 species of nep on my bedroom windowsill and only three of them are lowlanders.

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I dont think the RH in my bedroom is much higher than that, theres no reason i can see why you shouldnt give it a go, especially with the species that have thick leaves and are known to be tolerant of low RH. The RH in my windowsill right now is reading 25% (ok these RH meters are rubbish I know). Point is though, there's every chance you can grow a few.

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Pretty much most of the ones mentioned in the windowsill neps thread a while back are worth a shot, or anything thats regarded as intermediate. Even my mirabilis throws out the occasional pitcher at low humidity. A highland Truncata should be fine for example. Its worth experimenting, and dont take too much notice of people tell you. I've noticed with a lot of my highlanders that, some do great outside in a cold greenhouse, but others seem to grow much better when kept a little warmer e.g. khasiana and a few others.

Anyway i got these indoors at the moment as they are doing much better than when they were outside.

Gymnamphora

Rhombicaulis

Khasiana

Spectabilis

Sanguinea

Bongso

Truncata (Lowland)

Mirabilis

Gentle (grows anywhere)

Miranda

Rafflesiana

Ventrata (bomb proof)

Burbidgeae (didn't do anything outside, better in the window)

I'm not saying all these will work for you but at least give a few a try and see what happens. They rarely drop dead quickly, so you can see how they are adapting.

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I grew N. fazaliana started from cuttings, as a lowlander in Florida, USA with great results. The species can get quite large.

This is a picture of one in the greenhouse next to a lowland N. veitchii growing in plastic birdbaths in 2000. I donated both my male and female to a botanical garden here and they didn't last long :shock:

Nep_faz,_

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I don't know why, but this image did not want to upload for me! If it can be made difficult I can find a way! Anyhow this is N. fazaliana grown in Florida in lowland conditions. Behind where this picture was taken were a number of N. bicalcarata. My daytime temps. were easily 30C in the summer days and no lower than 22C at night.

N.faz.JPG

Steve Stewart

Florida, USA

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Hello Tony & hahaha,

Tony, Cliff Dodd was kind enough to share a cutting of his male and female Nepenthes fazaliana and the N. veitchii... with me. He also grows N. fusca (from several locations) but never had enough to share with me. Cliff is always very carefull about labeling plants and I don't recall any doubt about this plant, from Cliff or John de Kanel. For some reason, my N. fazaliana grew more robustly than most.

hahaha, I would love to share a cutting with you, but as I noted in the post before the photo, I donated both of my plants to a botancal garden and they no longer exist.

If you think the loss of these plants is sad, you don't want to hear about the 50+ flowering size N. bicalcarata I had grown from seedlings, from Cliff.

I no longer have any greenhouses to grow in, so my collection is very limited now. The picture was taken in 2000, and I had an enviable collection of plants at that time. I now have pictures, memories and an apartment with too many plants.

Steve Stewart

Florida, USA

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Guest BANNED hahaha
Hello Tony & hahaha,

Tony, Cliff Dodd was kind enough to share a cutting of his male and female Nepenthes fazaliana and the N. veitchii... with me. He also grows N. fusca (from several locations) but never had enough to share with me. Cliff is always very carefull about labeling plants and I don't recall any doubt about this plant, from Cliff or John de Kanel. For some reason, my N. fazaliana grew more robustly than most.

hahaha, I would love to share a cutting with you, but as I noted in the post before the photo, I donated both of my plants to a botancal garden and they no longer exist.

If you think the loss of these plants is sad, you don't want to hear about the 50+ flowering size N. bicalcarata I had grown from seedlings, from Cliff.

I no longer have any greenhouses to grow in, so my collection is very limited now. The picture was taken in 2000, and I had an enviable collection of plants at that time. I now have pictures, memories and an apartment with too many plants.

Steve Stewart

Florida, USA

You and me both buddy, you and me both.... I lost my collection two times, and now have so little space to build it up again, it's sad. All I got are some undeveloped photos of my second collection. :)
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If I recall a discussion on these plants correctly, according to Ch'ien, the N. faizaliana floating around that do NOT match the description of the species are very typical for N. fusca from Sarawak which is a very common plant there. Seed was distributed from ABG if I recall and several nurseries grew them up as N. faizaliana and distributed them as such, to retail nurseries, before they got to a larger size. The plants grown by Malesiana from material collected by Ch'ien do not look anything like these other 'N. faizaliana'.

Not trying to offend anyone here.. just to correct a situation with incorrectly identified plants. Cliffs plants probably came to him mislabelled originally and without having specimens of the real species there would be no reason to suspect their identity.

Here is the N. fusca Sarawak. Originallly sold as N. faizaliana. Color can vary a bit, as they get older they look more and more like N. fusca with a very narrow pointy lid, pitcher shape, pitcher opening, squared off leaves, etc

NfuscaSarawakBECR.jpg

Here is the N. faizaliana from Malesiana.

NfaizalianaMT2.jpg

The issue is probably that both come from Sarawak, which lead to the N. fusca getting mislabelled as N. faizaliana.

Tony

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Ok Tony. I haven't seen pics of the true faizaliana since Exotics posted theirs. The faizaliana and fusca sarawak are dif species. But the leaves and stem of most fuscas seem quite different than the fusca sarawak. I would think that fusca sarawak is atleast a sub-species.

This is a fusca sarawak from a japanese nursery

http://nepenthesnouen.web.infoseek.co.jp/Dsc07032.jpg

This is a typical fusca from Botanique

http://www.pitcherplant.com/image_folder1/nfus_trip.jpg

This is the real faizaliana from Exotica

http://www.exoticaplants.com.au/admin/uploads/big_faiz.jpg

I really think all three are different. Fusca sarawak would seem to have a narrower peristome than the others, with different leaf and stem morphology as well.

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hahaha - Your post has been edited and images have been replaced with links.

Please do not post images from other sites direct to the forum unless you have permission from the copyright holder to do so.

Forum rule 10> addresses this issue:

10]> Respect the intellectual property rights of others. Copyrighted images and text must not be posted to the forum from web sites or other sources without the owner's permission. Do not copy images posted to the forum by members without their permission. All images and text are assumed to be copyright of the owner unless stated otherwise.
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Hi,

The issue is probably that both come from Sarawak, which lead to the N. fusca getting mislabelled as N. faizaliana.

I had a long discussion with Rob Cantley and Andreas Wistuba concerning the N faizaliana - N. fusca they sell at the EEE in Prague. Both got seeds from the ABG plants. Rob also explained very well why ABG is quite sure they grow N. faizaliana - due to a wrong identification by a well known taxonomist. (I won't repeat this story - ask Rob).

The shape of the pitcher lid of the N. fusca Sarawak clearly is matching the description of N. fusca and not tthe description of N. faizaliana at all. Searching through old posts on PFT you'll find some topics coping with this issue.

Joachim

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Tony and Joachim,

This is a picture to give some idea as to the size of the plants I call Nepenthes faizaliana. The plant is planted in a bird bath, the moss is Polytrichum commune . There is a distinct tooth on the very narrow lid of this newly opened pitcher. It looks alot like the N. fusca Tony posted a picture of except for the lid. It doesn't look very much like the picture of N. faizaliana Tony posted. The pichers are not smooth and glabrous, but rather hirsute.

nfaiz1.JPG

Steve Stewart

Florida, USA

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