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Dan

Kimberley Utricularia

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Hi all,

As promised some photos of carnivores from the Kimberley IN NW Australia. First up some of the Utrics. We were pretty luck to see so many as the trip was in July, which is the dry season. Some out of season rain in the southern part of our walk saw the seeps flowing and a profusion of flowers!

Enjoy!

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U. uliginosa

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U. caerulea

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U. kamienskii

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U. kimberleyensis or singeriana???

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The back of the same flower...

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U. limosa

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U. gibba

Thanks to Sean Spence for help with the identification!

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Hi Ian,

They are terrestrial with the exception of the U.gibba, which is fully aquatic. We found U. uliginosa that was growing in an aquatic setting also (with much longer leaves than the same species in a terrestrial setting).

Cheers,

Dan.

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Wow, fantastic to see pics of such rare species!!!!!!!!!!!! Do you have more??

Seb said:

>Ohh I love this, I really am an utric lover and AU really is utric hevaen.

Only 2nd to S.America! :):)

Take Care,

Fernando Rivadavia

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Hi Rob-Rah,

Here's a picture of a typical habitat for the terrestrials. The orange flowers you can see are Drosera indica. Unfortunatley you can't see the utrics because of the resolution, but there are U. kamienskii and kimberleyensis in the photo, as well as a heap of petiolaris complex drosera.

habitat_utric.JPG

The setting is basically a seep flowing over a rock shelf on the bank of a creek. The substrate is sandy organic material. It is usually quite thin, but got up to about 2-3 inches thick in some holes in the rock basement. The seep emanates from a drainage line flowing into the main creek rather than from the creek itself. As you can see from the photo the plants are growing in full sun, and the light was very intense (felt hot to stand in even when it was cool int eh shade). Temperatures at the time of year we were there ranged from ~15-32degC and it is perfectly sunny every day (11.5 hour photoperiod in July). In December temps climb into the 40s and humidity builds to saturation. Then in Jan-March it rains all the time and temps in the 20-35degC range. Hard to replicate in cultivation!

Hope this helps!

Cheers,

Dan.

ps. Fernando, I do have more photos - but at the moment a lack of time to post them.

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Oh Dan, now I am really green with envy.. it's my dream to visit such a place :D

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How predictable am I???? :):)

>ps. Fernando, I do have more photos - but at the moment a lack of time to post them.

You read my mind, hahaha! When you first posted, of course I wondered what Drosera you had seen, but was happy to see rare Utrics as well! But the temptation to ask you about them became irresistible with this picture of orange flowered D.indica! I was about to press he reply button when I saw your comment. So... a "heap" of petiolaris complex plants??? Yummy! :):)

Hope to see more pics soon,

Fernando Rivadavia

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Hi Dan!

Fantastic photographs!

Are you sure the plant on the 3rd photo is U.kamienskii? I miss the rims on the palate of your plant! ;-) For me, the plant rather looks like U.georgei. I don't expect you took photographs of leaves, bladders and seed? ;-) ;-)

The 4th plant has a spur which seems a little too long and curves in the wrong direction for being U.singeriana. Did you check this plant probably being a form of the highly variable U.lasiocaulis that has just a poorly lobed lower lip?

What kind of camera did you use for your photographs?

All the best,

Andreas

PS: I just noticed that my U.kamienskii opened its first flower today, thus I was able to take this photograph for comparision (and to illustrate what I was trying to talk about ;-))

_U_kamienskii.jpg

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Guest craig

Hi Andreas,

These were quick ids, we have now gone through and identified nearly all of the Utrics we found on the trip. You are correct it is U.georgei. The purple one is U.kimberleynsis. We did find U.lasiocaulis at another location. The list of Utrics we found is now U.chrysantha, U.ulignosa, U.caerulea, U.kimberleynsis, U.georgei, U.leptoplectra, U.bifida, U.lasiocaulis and U.gibba.

We have a few more photos tham the ones Dan posted, but even with these the identification of the Utrics was difficult.

It would be interesting to see what additional species we would find in a visit in the wet season, as this visit was during the dry.

The camera is a Canon powershot A85 with lots of closeup filters.

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