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Belinda

Our family trip to Kedumba Walls

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Hi

Kedumba Walls is fairly inaccesible area in the

upper blue mtns national Park .

It has a number of small streams running into the area

with abt 4 small swamp areas.

We where amazed to find a small area fed by an underground spring

that appeared to create a permanent shallow wet area . What was amazing was how the peltata and dicotoma had adapted and

grew from within the mud beneath the water with no ill effects .

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A pygmae with gemmae nearby

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We also scouted out a sandy bank near the spring

The pelata where extremely advanced .

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Further on the bank we came across an area

where the peltata appered to have no rosettes or very small at best (considering there size ) - Sean any ideas ?

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a close up of a flower bud

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The sandy bank also held a colony of immensely

beautiful red rosetted spaulata - unbelivebaly red

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A fantastic morning was had by us all -the cps where in immense numbers -

The cps growing out of the permant shallow water was a highlight

regards Belinda

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Very nice. The D. binata are emerging from dormancy incredibly early. Must be due to the strange winter we have been having. Just goes to show how wet they like it. These types of areas are my favourite type of CP habitat.

It is common for mature plants of various forms of D. peltata to have no basal rosette. Nevertheless it is an interesting form which appears a little different from others. I notice that aphids are also present on the plants, something else I wouldn't have expected in the middle of winter.

Another thing I noticed was the abundance of small red Utricularia leaves growing submerged around the D. binata. They look very much like the leaves of U. uniflora but could easily be U. dichotoma. This will be a fantastic area to check out again in October when the Utricularia are in full flower and the D. binata fully matured.

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Guest Aidan

Another fruitful field-trip. You have been well and truly bitten by the 'carnivorous plant bug!' :)

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Hi Belinda,

I love them all,especially the last two pictures :D are they D.spatulata?the leaf shape is different from Hk's.sean knows :D

I think we have the same hobby :D

rex

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Great photos!

Are these tiny red spots on the second to last D. spatulata picture all seedlings?

I can also only agree with Sean that I will be interesting to see the utricularia in flower!

Keep going!

Dieter

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Guest Sheila

You are so lucky to have such a variety of wild carnivorous plants. The red colours are so strong, absolutely beautiful. :D

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Hi

We are going back this weekend to The Kedumba Walls area to again photograph the red spatulata and peltata and get clearer photos - which i will post in photos or drosera .

The tiny red spots are indeed seedlings of this spatuata colony .Im intrigued by the deep maroon colouration and plan to investigate this colony a little more.

regards Belinda

(You had to be there to realise how red these are - the photos don't do the colony justice)- hopefully clearer photos will show them in there full glory .

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