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Found 5 results

  1. Here's a bed of S. leucophylla Hurricane creek white from Baldwin Co, AL. The original site is about 100% altered and 99% destroyed. There aren't any outstanding clones left in the wild like we have in cultivation (well, there are nice ones still there but they don't compare), but there's still a relic patch of plants alive today, here's a link to the story: http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=51000 There's still a bunch of traps have yet to open, so these plants are not at their fullest potential, but they're starting to look nice! Photos taken 8/29/16:
  2. This plant produced some very white traps this year. Photos taken 8/30/14, which is actually pretty early for outdoors in California. Normally, we don't have the best pitchers until late September/early October:
  3. The original site where S. leucophylla hurricane creek white used to exist in the wild was plowed and turned into a pine tree plantation. While I never saw the original site before it was destroyed, I had heard it was a huge field filled with plants! The original site had many normal S. leucophyllas, but a few plants displayed the blinding white traps that we are fortunate enough to have preserved in cultivation prior to the site being destroyed. A lot of people probably are wondering, what does this site look like today, and is there anything left? Surprisingly, there is still a tiny little patch remaining to this day, but it is slowly being overgrown by the surrounding shrubs. Are there any super-white plants left? Sort of, but nothing like what we have in cultivation. 2 years ago when we first spotted this relic patch, there was a little opening in the shrubs (which were much shorter at the time) and you could walk in there and see quite a few plants. This little clearing had a decent amount of sunlight. As of 2013 (2 years later), that open patch is now filled with thick shrubs, and there's no way you can even attempt to walk in there! All of the plants that were once receiving decent light are now etiolated and shaded. Many only produced phyllodia. Will this patch survive in the long run? IF a fire comes through, or someone clears up the shrubs consistently, this relic site can potentially last a long time. However, the landowners clearly aren't interested in preserving these plants, and as is, the site will likely persist for a few more years at best. In the case of the S. rubra wherryi Chatom giant site, in 2004 (?), the population was in the same situation: they were heavily shaded by thick shrubs and struggling to survive. As of 2013, we didn't find a single Sarracenia in the original Chatom giant site. There were also gigantic S. psittacinas that used to grow there..these were also all gone. While I remain optimistic that the little hurricane creek patch may persist for a few more years, I remain skeptical that it will last through time. Photos of what remains of the original hurricane creek white site. This will likely be one of the last documented set of photos of the site before it disappears forever. It's damn hard to find, I'll tell you that much! Keep in mind, this used to be a field, but is now thick shrubs that eventually turn into a non-native forest (pine plantation) behind them: You used to be able to walk in here: Still, we did find an impressive hurricane creek white plant here and there: Most of them, however, looked like regular leucos, or relative white regular plants: They may be starving for light, but they sure aren't starving for insects! In two years, this will likely turn into thick brush: Actually, some beautiful and interesting plants are still alive: you can tell this is a relative of hurricane creek white: Decent hurricane creek white plant: The dark green and contrasting white is what makes hurricane creek white so unique. Most other populations don't have that characteristic:
  4. This year, we have had some exceptional weather here in Northern California. In late April/Early May, we had a heat wave where the temperatures reached the low 90's (approx. 32C), and in general, there have been many warm days reaching the low 80's (approx. 27C). This abnormally warm weather, coupled with our standard California sunshine, has resulted in earlier than normal pitcher production. S. leucophylla Hurricane Creek White has really benefitted from this warm weather. As discussed in other posts, one of the many great facets of this now extinct in the wild population is that they produce solid spring and fall pitchers. Many other S. leucophylla clones only produce really nice fall pitchers. The spring pitchers are typically bright white, but some can have red pigments in them. While they are impressive, the fall pitchers are typically larger and brighter white. However, when grown as a dense stand as photographed below, these plants are so white that they sometimes glow at night! All of these photos below were taken mid May 2013. These are all spring pitchers of various different clones:
  5. I visited UC Davis yesterday and Ernesto, the curator of the UCD Botanical conservatory, gave me a tour of a new greenhouse (well, relatively new) located on top of one of the science buildings. Back when I was in college, the lab TA's would get ticked off at my friends and I for ditching classes to do tissue culture in another lab (for fun of course) and hang out at the conservatory. I think they would have been less disappointed if we're skipping class to drink booz or smoke dope, haha Anyow, UCD has a pretty neat CP display, and the most note-worthy ones this time of the year was S. leucophylla. I tried to catch Ernesto offguard in this photo, but apparently, he was on high alert and knew I was going to photograph him: A typical S. leucophylla clone: Another clone up close: S. leucophylla Hurricane Creek White-this greenhouse was very warm this time of the year, and there is supplemental lighting as well. Check out the slight yellow tinge on the lower portion of the petiole: This trap was pretty big and the trap felt fuzzy: Another shot-sorry, the light from this angle sucked: In contrast, here are some plants growing outdoors-some of these may be the same clone as photographed above: