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Found 10 results

  1. Greetings,Your help or advice is greatly appreciated as this carnivorous plant parent is in pain. As I've begun my second set of carnivorous plants, I requested and received (with much difficulty during the process) over 200+ seeds of 6 different species from the Carnivorous Plant Society. Due to the sheer volume of seeds I received, I thought certainly by now at least some would have germinated in similar conditions as the other carnivorous plants I'd successfully grown first. However, it has been 7-10 weeks (depending on the species, plus some obviously required different stratification lengths and strategies, which add a few to several weeks onto that - I've even done a few as 1/2 and 1/2 stratified differently or some so & not at all to see if there are different results) and NONE of the seeds have germinated: NONE. I've done extensive research from many sites, including this one, and have done all as appropriate for stratification, germination, and prepared environments for their various needs after sprouting (hopefully.) What's more, I had inquired a few times with CPS to see how old these seeds were before they were sent to me, and there has not been any response since I inquired a few times during the shipment process and after receiving them...The seeds are temporarily (as I also have a greenhouse for grown plants & another growing area) in a germination tank near the top with 1/2 covers, keeping 76-82 F temperatures regularly night and day, 50-75% humidity within the enclosure, fan ventilation from top (not shown in picture due to distance& placement,) peat moss and perlite (mixed at various levels of each per species recommendations) rinsed many times over with R/O water until there was no dust or cloudiness in either, the seeds were sprinkled on top (most are almost impossible to see on the dark, wet medium) with a very, very light dusting of peat moss dust that I sifted through fabric sprinkled about, the water tray that is filled and cleaned (safely of course) weekly, soil mix is always moist but not water logged, they receive tons (about 16 hrs full cycle) of light from the plant spectrum Fluval nano LEDs (7500K 1000lm 6 band light with 24 hour changing light cycle) and the T8 Fluorescent Aqueon full spectrum FloraMax light (I have a different UFO red, blue, white, infrared, and uva/uvb LED light for the Greenhouse when not outdoors.) You can see photos of my germination setup at https://sites.google.com/view/jessica-teeters/vfts. There was for a short time some white fuzzy mold popping up randomly here or there, but that has stopped for quite some time now since I dabbed those areas of medium with a q-tip of neem oil. I've read here that this should not hurt the seeds in any way, so it shouldn't be that - nonetheless in such targeted, small doses. Here are the species I'm working with, so some had stratification methods applied to them. Again, I had so many that some species that had mixed results from stratifying or not were split up into 1/2 being stratified and 1/2 not just to see. Cephalotus Follicularis typicalD. Muscipula mixedD. anglicaD. Montana var tomentosa , Serra de CarracaS. Judith Hindle opStylidium macranthumThey were shipped to me twice: once toward late last year/early this year then again in late February due to shipment (Post Office) error. Then stratified (to those applicable) and sown onto their soil. They did come from the UK to here (Indiana) through the USDA, but the first time the label wasn't looked at correctly so it was sent back and then re-mailed to me again. Could it be because they were air mailed and then post mailed in colder climates back and forth so much for an extended period of time before I got them? Any advice, tips, help? I feel like I'm at a loss. It'd be greatly appreciated!
  2. Greetings,Your help or advice is greatly appreciated as this carnivorous plant parent is in pain. As I've begun my second set of carnivorous plants, I requested and received (with much difficulty during the process) over 200+ seeds of 6 different species from the Carnivorous Plant Society. Due to the sheer volume of seeds I received, I thought certainly by now at least some would have germinated in similar conditions as the other carnivorous plants I'd successfully grown first. However, it has been 7-10 weeks (depending on the species, plus some obviously required different stratification lengths and strategies, which add a few to several weeks onto that - I've even done a few as 1/2 and 1/2 stratified differently or some so & not at all to see if there are different results) and NONE of the seeds have germinated: NONE. I've done extensive research from many sites, including this one, and have done all as appropriate for stratification, germination, and prepared environments for their various needs after sprouting (hopefully.) What's more, I had inquired a few times with CPS to see how old these seeds were before they were sent to me, and there has not been any response since I inquired a few times during the shipment process and after receiving them...The seeds are temporarily (as I also have a greenhouse for grown plants & another growing area) in a germination tank near the top with 1/2 covers, keeping 76-82 F temperatures regularly night and day, 50-75% humidity within the enclosure, fan ventilation from top (not shown in picture due to distance& placement,) peat moss and perlite (mixed at various levels of each per species recommendations) rinsed many times over with R/O water until there was no dust or cloudiness in either, the seeds were sprinkled on top (most are almost impossible to see on the dark, wet medium) with a very, very light dusting of peat moss dust that I sifted through fabric sprinkled about, the water tray that is filled and cleaned (safely of course) weekly, soil mix is always moist but not water logged, they receive tons (about 16 hrs full cycle) of light from the plant spectrum Fluval nano LEDs (7500K 1000lm 6 band light with 24 hour changing light cycle) and the T8 Fluorescent Aqueon full spectrum FloraMax light (I have a different UFO red, blue, white, infrared, and uva/uvb LED light for the Greenhouse when not outdoors.) You can see photos of my germination setup at https://sites.google.com/view/jessica-teeters/vfts. There was for a short time some white fuzzy mold popping up randomly here or there, but that has stopped for quite some time now since I dabbed those areas of medium with a q-tip of neem oil. I've read here that this should not hurt the seeds in any way, so it shouldn't be that - nonetheless in such targeted, small doses. Here are the species I'm working with, so some had stratification methods applied to them. Again, I had so many that some species that had mixed results from stratifying or not were split up into 1/2 being stratified and 1/2 not just to see. Cephalotus Follicularis typicalD. Muscipula mixedD. anglicaD. Montana var tomentosa , Serra de CarracaS. Judith Hindle opStylidium macranthumThey were shipped to me twice: once toward late last year/early this year then again in late February due to shipment (Post Office) error. Then stratified (to those applicable) and sown onto their soil. They did come from the UK to here (Indiana) through the USDA, but the first time the label wasn't looked at correctly so it was sent back and then re-mailed to me again. Could it be because they were air mailed and then post mailed in colder climates back and forth so much for an extended period of time before I got them? Any advice, tips, help? I feel like I'm at a loss. It'd be greatly appreciated!
  3. Rhys Ki

    VFT Mystery

    Greetings all, Starting again on this forum like a few others are (unfortunately all of my posts & my account were gone, but we're moving onward!) I hope everyone gets back on their feet alright after the data loss upset. However, I have perused and perused posts for hours trying to figure this out... So, before I get to the mystery itself I will let you know the conditions which my VFT's are currently experiencing: I have about 12 VFT's grown from seed. They are 8 months old and about only 4 mm tall/wide, but some with anywhere between a few and up to 15 traps on each plant. They are planted in a large, wide tray with glass walls, insulated around the outside where the soil is with cardboard, and a ventilated / half-open top. The medium is 8-10 inches (20-25 cm) deep of 60/40 peat moss and black silica sand with a loose gravel bottom layer. They are "injected" (I simply use a needle-less syringe / eye dropper tool to squeeze water near each plant) about once a week and occasionally top watered with a spray bottle every now and then in between injections. The soil is typically moist and very rarely completely dries out before I water again, but just enough. Temperatures are kept at about 76 - 78 degrees F (approx. 24 - 26 C) when the lights are on, and about 74 - 76 degrees F (approx. 23 - 24 C) at night when the lights are off. They receive 16 hours a day of artificial light from 2 long T8 Full Spectrum FloraMax fluorescent lights that are about 8 inches (20 cm) away from the plants as well as at least a few hours a day of sunlight (as long as it is not terribly cloudy) through the glass door they stand beside. For outdoor temp zone reference, I live in Indiana, USA. SO, here is the mystery: I have a few plants that simply have wanted to give up in the last several weeks, specifically once it got colder, with many traps just turning black on an every-other-day basis at times for some plants. Yet, they are right next to plants that are thriving and doing fantastically! For instance, I had 2 plants that are planted not but 1.5 inches (4 cm) apart, and one is doing amazing (very green) with over a dozen traps on it - but its direct neighbor who up until recently had just as many traps looks wilted and has had its traps almost all go black in a matter of a very short time (about 1-2 weeks for this one.) There are others in the same environment but doing the same thing - near very well-performing plants but have been struggling like none other for some reason since winter cold, and I can't figure it out... Why would some be doing so very well, but others next to those ones be ailing and not creating new growth as old growth dies off? Could it be that the medium needs refreshed, they're trying to go into dormancy for some reason, competition or simple natural selection, change in closeness/amount of light, or is it the fact that they had been eating some aphids in the late summer/fall before I took care of the issue and they haven't eaten since (or ate too often before to help the newer growth thrive?) It seems so complex to me, and I keep reading differing opinions on what this could mean... Any help and feedback would be appreciated. Thank you in advance!
  4. I've always wanted to produce a gigantic field of leucophllas and have been attempting to do that forever, but haven't really been able to get anywhere. It just takes way too many plants, and you have to space them out much more than any other species (or so it seems) in order to get good fall traps. Well, now that I'm in this new location, space isn't much of a limitation, so the first attempt to make a field of leucos was made. Turns out, it's more like 2 rows of leucos than a field, but good enough! Technically speaking, this isn't one population, but multiple populations from various localities. There's albas, pinks, reds, regulars, and weirdos all up in the mix. These looked a bit ratty all summer long because there were tons of spring traps that had fallen over and turned brown, but I spent all weekend cleaning them up and now they look pretty nice! Interestingly enough, there are some late summer traps, but the main fall traps haven't yet shot out yet, so these will likely become even more impressive prolly in the next month or so. The growth points on many plants are showing fall traps, but a few are still spitting out phyllodia. Here's some pics, photos taken 8/14/16: Here you can see some of the bigger "fall traps" being produced. They're sparse at this time of year, and usually we don't see these traps until September at the earliest here in Northern California: I took a couple of "face" shots from the population, and they'll probably look more impressive in a few weeks. These late summer traps are generally a lot more dull looking, but still interesting enough to post: One of the sneakiest chameleons of them all, S. leucophylla var. alba Covington Co, AL. Sometimes, the fall traps look like regular leucophylla, but I finally caught this one looking quite white: a peculiar looking leucophylla from northern Baldwin Co, AL. Probably had some hybridizing in it's distant past: If the late summer trap on this S. leucophylla Baldwin Co, AL looks like this, can't wait to see the fall traps! Last year, this clone only produced phyllodia, but this year it has some strong looking growth emerging: I think this one is washington Co, AL: A typical trap from Eastern Alabama. These genotypes tend to produce both strong spring and fall pitchers here in Northern California, and are possibly more resilient to cooler grow season temps: This clone from Baldwin Co, AL had been pollinated, and I don't see any fall traps emerging regretfully. A lot of the times, when the plant focuses energy into seed production, it doesn't always have a spectacular fall show: Same trap as above: Random clone, no idea where it's from. Nice "asparagus" fall pitcher developing in the background: Now this is a washington Co, AL leuco: Yup, even my wife said this one was "cute" and she has the highest standards out of anyone I know:
  5. Hello Everyone, I would like to provide and update on my attempts to grow a N ampullaria on a windowsill in the UK. I've always wanted to grow this plant. But since my girlfriend moved in, the space I'm allowed to dedicate to carnivorous plants has been somewhat restricted ("houses are for people, not for carnivorous plants" she says). So unfortunately I don't have space for a terrarium large enough to house a Nepenthes. A couple of years ago I thought I'd see whether it was possible to grow this plant on a windowsill. I bought a nice speckled ampullaria from Andreas Wistuba and simply placed it on a windowsill (that doesn't receive any direct sunlight) under some growlux tubes. The plant immediately stopped forming pitchers and as the months passed the rosette of pitcherless leaves was getting smaller and smaller. I suspected the plant was heading for a slow death. The next thing I tried was coiling a soil warming cable around the inside of the pot. This coil was attached to a thermostat which I set to 24C. Over the next few months the leaves slowly began to grow larger but still did not form pitchers. So then a few months ago I placed a plastic dome over the plant to increase the humidity. Here are some photos of my plant now. It responded very posittively to the increase in humidity and is now forming very nice pitchers. So it does appear to be possible to create the correct temperature and humidity conditions for lowland nepenthes on a UK windowsill; using a thermostatically controlled soil warming cable and a plastic dome. However this is not a cheap solution. The soil warming cable cost around £30 and the thermostatic controller cost around £45. I hope this post is useful for some other growers. Regards Mark
  6. Hi everybody, I'm going to receive a specimen of N. campanulata. I know it's a delicate and rare specie and it's in this way that I would ask you something. What kind of substrate do you use for it ? Thanks.
  7. A new, free online journal dedicated to the world of succulent plants is now available online: Acta Succulenta. It's downloadable in 3 distinct editions (English, French and Italian), free of advertising. I'm the Editor of the Journal. http://www.acta-succulenta.eu (English) http://acta-succulen...1_2013_EN.pdf�� (French) http://acta-succulen...1_1_2013_FR.pdf (Italian) http://acta-succulen..._IT.pdf�������� The download is free. The size of the pdf file is quite big, so please be patient while it downloads. Any article about succulent plants is welcome. I hope you enjoy Acta Succulenta. Davide Donati
  8. Hello CPUK. I don't often post here, and largely lurk. But I posted something about my concerns for successfully cultivating my imminently arriving U. mannii to the ICPS forum. It was pointed out to me that those with the proper experience are typically found here. I have included the other post below, but in essence I would like to hear from successful growers of U. mannii about their cultivation techniques. Any advice would be most welcome. Thank you all for your time, whether simple reading this comment or for forthcoming assistance! ----------- Hello all - Let me start out by saying that I like tubers. They are awesome! Chubby little storehouses of life modestly hiding just below the surface. Never boasting of their importance to the rest of the plant. When conditions are good the gaudier parts of the plant unfurl and make grand displays, but when times get rough those flashy parts fade away and life retreats back to the security of the tuber. I grow several tuberous sundews, but given the location of this thread I am sure you know where this is going. I have been trying to better succeed with the tuberous species of bladderworts. I have kept U. endresii for 5 years. It always makes it, but never does anything spectacular. I have been doing great with my U. alpina, but who hasn't. I had a U. quelchii for one season, a small tuber that was gifted in a trade and only ever put up one tiny leaf before it blinked out - though I'd like to try it again someday. On to my current concern. I have just ordered U. mannii. This may have been foolish. I am both excited and nervous about successfully cultivating this difficult species. I would love to hear from someone who has successfully grown this species, but I'd also like any information people have on its successful cultivation. I'd like to know temperature regimes, both diurnal and seasonal (hopefully more than just "keep it cool", I misinterpreted that with my Drosera schizandra and I think I killed it with cold temps), watering needs including seasonal changes, humidity requirements, and critically, substrate preferences. Right now, I am planning on growing it in a small net pot with live sphagnum moss either sitting in a small tray of water or misting it well daily, and keeping the temperature around 15-22C. Does this sound like a good plan to those with experience in highland utrics?
  9. Hello CPUK. I don't often post here, and largely lurk. But I posted something about my concerns for successfully cultivating my imminently arriving U. mannii to the ICPS forum. It was pointed out to me that those with the proper experience are typically found here. I have included the other post below, but in essence I would like to hear from successful growers of U. mannii about their cultivation techniques. Any advice would be most welcome. Thank you all for your time, whether simple reading this comment or for forthcoming assistance! ----------- Hello all - Let me start out by saying that I like tubers. They are awesome! Chubby little storehouses of life modestly hiding just below the surface. Never boasting of their importance to the rest of the plant. When conditions are good the gaudier parts of the plant unfurl and make grand displays, but when times get rough those flashy parts fade away and life retreats back to the security of the tuber. I grow several tuberous sundews, but given the location of this thread I am sure you know where this is going. I have been trying to better succeed with the tuberous species of bladderworts. I have kept U. endresii for 5 years. It always makes it, but never does anything spectacular. I have been doing great with my U. alpina, but who hasn't. I had a U. quelchii for one season, a small tuber that was gifted in a trade and only ever put up one tiny leaf before it blinked out - though I'd like to try it again someday. On to my current concern. I have just ordered U. mannii. This may have been foolish. I am both excited and nervous about successfully cultivating this difficult species. I would love to hear from someone who has successfully grown this species, but I'd also like any information people have on its successful cultivation. I'd like to know temperature regimes, both diurnal and seasonal (hopefully more than just "keep it cool", I misinterpreted that with my Drosera schizandra and I think I killed it with cold temps), watering needs including seasonal changes, humidity requirements, and critically, substrate preferences. Right now, I am planning on growing it in a small net pot with live sphagnum moss either sitting in a small tray of water or misting it well daily, and keeping the temperature around 15-22C. Does this sound like a good plan to those with experience in highland utrics?
  10. Hello everyone, I would like to share with you a very easy method of growing Utricularia biloba so that it would flower for you like crazy. I took a 1x1 cm piece and have planted it in round pot in pure peat. Maybe mixes of peat with sand in proportion 1:1 or a layer of sand on the surface might be beneficial, but it seems that in pure peat it is doing fine until other conditions are met. I took one pot two number bigger, so that I could submerge the plant. So sometimes it was under 1 cm water layer which than I let to dry out a bit, sometimes even to the moment when all the water evaporated and than poured it with water again. I made that pot in December 2011 and kept on south windowsill. Temperatures souring the day around 18-19*C and during the night around 13-15*C. That is really not that important. Before summer came, the pot was already fully overgrown by the plant. When the temperatures outdoor were long time positive I took the pot out on my terrace to provide it full sun. Since that moment I kept the soil always having much moisture, mostly in shallow water. In the middle of summer it started to produce first flower stalks which than started to appear like crazy. Many of them were damaged by my lovely animals, but still most survived and beautifully flowered. I cannot tell how long it was flowering, but it was at least 3-4 weeks if not longer. In addition I will say that U. fulva is very similar in cultivation, I just have to get back home to take a proper care of it. It should definitely grow in sand or at least have 1,5-2 cm sand layer on the surface and should always be submerged with around 2-3 cm of water, the rest is the same. When I came home last time the soil was dried, although I gave instructions to keep it under water, it is not that tolerant like U. biloba. I hope you enjoy: Kind regards, Chris