Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'cobra lily in the wild'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General
    • Forum Announcements
    • Introductions
    • Forum Feedback
    • Competitions
    • Forum Auction
  • Societies, General Information and FAQ
    • European Carnivorous Plant Exhibit & Exchange 2019
    • General Carnivorous Plant Discussion
    • Carnivorous Plant Societies
    • Open Days & Events
    • Carnivorous Plant Websites
    • FAQ
  • Indoor & Outdoor Cultivation
    • Bog Gardens
    • Dormancy
    • Greenhouses - Cultivation & Equipment
    • Propagation
    • Sustainable and Peat-free Cultivation
    • Terraria - Cultivation & Equipment
  • Carnivorous Genera
    • Brocchinia & Catopsis
    • Genlisea
    • Pinguicula
    • Pitcher Plants
    • Pseudo & Indirect Carnivorous Plants
    • Spring Traps
    • Sundews
    • Utricularia
  • Photographs of Carnivorous Plants
    • Carnivorous Plants in Cultivation
    • Carnivorous Plants in Habitat
  • Non- Carnivorous Plants
    • Aroids
    • Cacti & Succulents
    • Orchids
    • Other Plants
    • Sphagnum
  • Open Forum
    • Talk About Anything

Blogs

  • CPUK Administrator
  • Andy Collins' Blog
  • ihatov1001's Blog
  • guillaume59's Blog
  • Daniel G's Blog
  • Sundew Grow Guides Update
  • Bacchanalia
  • themrdave's Blog
  • I don't know how my Ping puts up with me
  • midge's Bloghgyhg
  • Shoultsy11's plants and what I want
  • Odysseus' Blog
  • NateCarnivore's Blog
  • NateCarnivore's want list (USA)
  • cam2045's Blog
  • The greenhouse quest
  • Nepenthes Lowii's Blog
  • gricey's Blog
  • Yossu's Ramblings
  • Pirate.radio.dj's Blog
  • plantescarnivores.net
  • Yunzi's Blog
  • SHOPPING
  • Wholesale Halloween Costumes
  • Heliamphora TC blog
  • dimentia research
  • tobacco shops near me
  • mens sherwani pakistani
  • Tax classes online
  • sea buckthorn oil
  • cognitive neuroscience
  • cool leather jackets

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 1 result

  1. Darlingtonias typically grow on hillside seeps high in the rocky, nutrient poor mountains. If they're found in a forest, the trees are usually either stunted or dying due to the harsh environmental conditions. However, one site has been discovered in the middle of the forest, which is a completely anomalous place to find cobra lilies. For a cool video and even more photos of darlingtonias in the wild, check out Rob Co's famous The Pitcher Plant Project: http://thepitcherpla...rip-2013-day-1/ I visited this site in 2010, and according to Damon Collinsworth of California Carnivores and Harry Tryon, a local Darlingtonia expert, the site looked a lot worse than it did approx. 10 years ago. Back then, they recalled the site was a lot more open, and is now getting shadier and shadier. Three years after visiting this site, my good friend Rob Co of the pitcher plant project and I revisited this site, and I was expecting "sarracenia doom and gloom." Was this site completely shaded out now, and how are the plants doing? To my surprise, the site looked even better than it did in 2010! I actually have some shots that I took in 2010, and you can compare them to 2013! Here's the site, photo taken 10/11/2013. Notice it's getting full sun! a really beautiful site: Ferns, azaleas, and other natives competing with Darlingtonia: Notice the dead or dying tree in the background: ironically, this is what gives me hope that this site will continue. The seep is too toxic and boggy for trees to colonize: Here's a picture of a darlingtonia plant from this site taken Sept. 17, 2010: Here's the exact same plant 3 years later, photo taken 10/11/13. They normally are even bigger after 3 years, but I suppose things are a bit slower at this site: To digress and belabor the point above, here's a clump at a different site, taken 9/17/10. There is one more plant behind it, but it's hard to tell because of the angle of the photo: The clump in the foreground is the same exact plant as the photo above! When these things send out stolons, they can really get big quickly. Unlike Sarracenias, Darlingtonias are doing very well in the wild! Photo taken 10/11/13: