Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'carnivorous'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Calendars

  • Community Calendar

Forums

  • General
    • Forum Announcements
    • Introductions
    • Forum Feedback
    • Competitions
    • Forum Auction
  • Societies, General Information and FAQ
    • European Carnivorous Plant Exhibit & Exchange 2019
    • General Carnivorous Plant Discussion
    • Carnivorous Plant Societies
    • Open Days & Events
    • Carnivorous Plant Websites
    • FAQ
  • Indoor & Outdoor Cultivation
    • Bog Gardens
    • Dormancy
    • Greenhouses - Cultivation & Equipment
    • Propagation
    • Sustainable and Peat-free Cultivation
    • Terraria - Cultivation & Equipment
  • Carnivorous Genera
    • Brocchinia & Catopsis
    • Genlisea
    • Pinguicula
    • Pitcher Plants
    • Pseudo & Indirect Carnivorous Plants
    • Spring Traps
    • Sundews
    • Utricularia
  • Photographs of Carnivorous Plants
    • Carnivorous Plants in Cultivation
    • Carnivorous Plants in Habitat
  • Non- Carnivorous Plants
    • Aroids
    • Cacti & Succulents
    • Orchids
    • Other Plants
    • Sphagnum
  • Open Forum
    • Talk About Anything

Blogs

  • CPUK Administrator
  • Andy Collins' Blog
  • ihatov1001's Blog
  • guillaume59's Blog
  • Daniel G's Blog
  • Sundew Grow Guides Update
  • Bacchanalia
  • themrdave's Blog
  • I don't know how my Ping puts up with me
  • midge's Bloghgyhg
  • Shoultsy11's plants and what I want
  • Odysseus' Blog
  • NateCarnivore's Blog
  • NateCarnivore's want list (USA)
  • cam2045's Blog
  • The greenhouse quest
  • Nepenthes Lowii's Blog
  • gricey's Blog
  • Yossu's Ramblings
  • Pirate.radio.dj's Blog
  • plantescarnivores.net
  • Yunzi's Blog
  • SHOPPING
  • Wholesale Halloween Costumes
  • Heliamphora TC blog
  • dimentia research
  • tobacco shops near me
  • mens sherwani pakistani
  • Tax classes online
  • sea buckthorn oil
  • cognitive neuroscience
  • cool leather jackets

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 10 results

  1. Black Sarracenia have been in the cross hairs of breeders for a long time now, but few have succeeded in creating such a beast. Granted, there are a few Sarracenia out there that do turn black with an "artificial suntan" aka when greenhouse grown, but has anyone made a plant that turns black from head to toe without the need of a greenhouse? It's definitely not easy to make such a plant, the reason being that most of the black clones/genetics in cultivation are difficult to coax that color out of them. They really need the exact right conditions to darken up! Sure, they will get black when grown under powerful lights indoors or under greenhouse conditions, but outdoors, they merely get dark. Here's a good example of a black alata that gets dark under my outdoor conditions, but not black. This is S. alata dark 'upward lid' Stone Co, MS: In the wild, they definitely can get pretty dark as the traps age, but you don't see such a high frequency of dark alatas in cultivation. As an aside, I've bred with many "proven" black alata clones only to find the offpsring are generally not as impressive. Some selfed plants (ie. selfed alata 'Night') looked quite impressive greenhouse grown, but they still don't color up easily outdoors. Anyways, the pics below are from wild plants growing in Stone Co, MS: Previously, the closest thing I've personally grown that gets really dark without a greenhouse suntan is Phil's Faulisi's Black Widow: Honorable mention shout out to Rob Sacilotto's S. 'Tornado'(aka S. 'Vortex') There are also pictures online of some black flava x alata crosses made by insektenfang.com, but since the pictures are clearly copyrighted, I'm not going to copy them in this thread. That hybrid appears to have a very black head, but the body is dark red. I'm very confident these were greenhouse grown plants, and they appear to be as dark as some of the black alatas grown under greenhouse conditions. For those of us without greenhouses, are there any individual plants out there that turn black even under outdoor conditions? I'm not aware of any non-man made plants like that. Logically, there has to be a way to make a completely black plant from head to toe using flava rubricorpora and the dark alatas, so that's what I did. Black widow is really cool, but I want blacker! LOL I made several small batch crosses with many different clones in search of that black individual. By small batch, I mean I sowed between 30-50 or so seeds per batch. Surprisingly, most were duds: while the plants were pretty and many were bright red, none were black, so I tossed every last cross out. In one cross, I did get a few darker indivduals, but not darker than black widow. GAH!!!! Phil either got lucky or did a lot of pheno hunting to find black widow. Anyways, Next thought was, what if I grew out over a 1000 seeds, will that one black individual appear? Those black genes have to be there somewhere, maybe it's just a numbers game. But it's not practical to grow out 1000 of each cross, that could take up a lot of space very quickly and become impractical. I decided to focus on one cross that had dark individuals and re-made it the following year, producing an enormous seed batch. If a few dark ones showed up in 50 seeds or less, will that one black one show up in 1000? It was a ridiculous amount of work transplanting seedlings and culling lighter colored individuals. No, I didn't grow them all the way out (don't have space and time for that), I did massive cullings and selected out the darkest ones. With a combination of an educated guess and the power of numbers, I finally found that one individual that I was looking for! Interestingly, NOT A SINGLE OTHER PLANT in the super sized seedling batch was as dark as this individual! There were some that I suspect could probably get blacker with an artificial suntan, but I was looking for the one that gets black under multiple environmental conditions. There were other individuals that came close in terms of blackness, but I culled them to make sure imposters don't go into circulation. Speaking of imposters, this is the reason that I'm not giving out exact details about the clones used in this cross, but in general, flava rubricorpora and alata were used, just like in Phil's black widow cross. Perhaps the beans are being spilled quite early as this plant is still a seedling, but after you see the pics below, you'll probably agree that this individual is already outstanding. In case you haven't already read this thread about seedling selection and want to dig deeper, I recommend reading this: http://sarracenia.proboards.com/thread/4004/seedling-selection This un-named clone below doesn't start off black: the traps really have to age before it gets to this color. This plant was naturally grown outdoors in Northern California, and quite possibly represents one of the first of its kind that can get black from head to toe without an artificial greenhouse suntan: In case you want to zoom in to see the details of the pic above: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/39714739103/in/dateposted/ and if you want to zoom in: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/31737863587/in/photostream/ The whole dang thing is black: Another shot: notice some of the younger, smaller traps still have some greenish pigments on the lid: In case you want a close up of that last pic: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/45954892134/in/photostream/ This is still a seedling, so again, I may be spilling the beans a bit early about it. For this reason, it won't be named or go into circulation until it reaches vegetative maturity and has been throughly "explored." Who knows, something better might turn up in the meantime. To be continued....
  2. I have a very large nephenthes that I have been taking care of since last year. To survive the cold winter I took it inside to a sunroom. Since it has started warming up I went ahead and put it outside and to my joy it has begun to blossom! One thing that worries me though is I realized a good handful of the leaves are getting ever so slightly brown and frail. It’s not on all of them but definitely on parts farthest away from the base. I only gave my nephenthes a few meal worms over the winter out of both testing and because I felt it needed something to eat. Do you think it’s turning brown because of the lack of bugs I have fed it or because of the sudden introduction to unfiltered sunlight? Thanks for reading. Any solace/instruction appreciated.
  3. I was wondering how many people in this forum live in and around Bristol and would be up for creating a Bristol based group? The idea would be to meetup at each others houses, see each others plants, talk about the different species, give tips, swap plants etc. What do you think?
  4. Hello people, Figured whilst I'm growing them that I would get involved in a UK Forum about them as well. I will shortly attach some pictures of my current set up as where I live isn't ideal for growing plants outdoors and we haven't yet had the time to build a suitable sheltered growing space outside in the garden. I'm currently germinating carnivorous varieties along with someone types of plants as well (mainly trees to be made into bonsai, hoping to start some fruits/veg/herbs and some house plant types also) I'm hoping that I can learn some new things by reading this forum and hopefully meet some new people :) **EDIT: added the pictures finally after some resizing, sorry been a while since I used a forum.
  5. Red variants of S. leucophylla from Washington County Alabama are almost unheard of and are extremely rare, but they do exist. To recap, I suspect the red pigments in S. leucophylla originated from hybridizing with other species and then back-crossing with lecuophylla several generations to the point that you can't tell it was originally of hybrid origin. In Santa Rosa and okaloosa Co, FL leucophylla crossed mainly with flavas and roseas to get the red pigments. On the other hand, I suspect the washington Co, AL leucophyllas crossed with alata and rubra wherryi to get these red pigments! This makes them very genetically unique. Normally, the red pigments are found concentrated below the white on the petiole, which gives a strong contrasting look (ie. red plants from Walton Co, FL, Franklin Co, FL, Okaloosa Co, FL, Covington Co, AL variants). In some cases, the whole pitcher becomes reddish as the trap ages. On the other hand, freshly opened pitchers on the Washington Co, AL have red that is suffused with the white and just below the white pigments on the petiole! If I had to guess, rubra wherryi is the reason you see this difference. Photos taken 10/5/16: This thing has a really FAT lip too, almost looks kinda like a nepenthes peristome without the "lines": The kink in the trap is environmental: The spring traps were much redder, but I think I transplanted it in early summer so the adjustment caused this plant to not be as red. it'll be interesting to see what the traps look like next spring.
  6. Hi Guys, Jason Walker here. Hope you are all good and well. I have started an Amazon affiliate website for Venus Fly Traps and other Carnivorous plants. We are currently looking for dropshipping opportunities for all Carnivorous products and was hoping someone here could help? Kind Regards Jason Walker Venus Fly Traps
  7. Hello my friends :) A few weeks ago I bought myself a 4K camcorder and a couple of macro lenses for it. This has allowed me to add some 4K videos to my carnivorous plant channel: https://www.youtube.com/carnivorouscorner I have 182 carnivorous plant videos on my channel, and the idea is to demonstrate to people just how awesome these plants are, and hopefully capture details which show just why us collectors love them so much. With the latest videos being in 4K resolution, hopefully they are among the cleanest and most crispest videos available out there. :)
  8. This is my FIRST proper attempt at growing carnivorous plants outdoors. I have spent years with them on the windowsills and i finally decided it would be nice to try and create one outdoors which i have put off ever since my expensive cobra lily died the second it went outside (I now believe this was because he was in the full sun!) The Sarracenia traps were already brown in their pots and due to the size they grew, decided these must be first to go outside, along the troth i have also added in another type of Sarracenia and also a Venus Fly Trap and a Sundew which wasn't 'thriving' indoors. My only problem is i don't have a tray beneath this trough so i am relying on memory to keep the soil very moist each day, luckily the location of this there is plenty of sun, and when it does rain it gets nice coverage. Before planting i mixed some of the 'E-coco Carnivorous Plant Fertilizer' which is made from worms or something and mixed with water. Day 1
  9. Hi all So I am the owner of http://www.youtube.com/fnglazz I started the channel itself a few years ago, but a couple of years ago, I started uploading carnivorous plant videos that I have filmed. The idea was to share with the world why exactly I find these plants so damn cool. It has grown and grown and now has over 230 subscribers and over a million lifetime views. The reason why I am posting this here though is because I am hoping that any of you who have carnivorous plant videos will share them so I can put them on my channel. In return, you will obviously get credit and a link in the description of your choosing as a way to increase traffic to which ever site you choose. So if any of you have videos you would like to share, please do. Only two conditions: 1. The video is of reasonable quality 2. Either mute or no background music (normal background sound is fine though) I started my fascination with these plants when I was about 8 years old. Now I want to show the world why we CP enthusiasts find these plants to be so damned cool. I hope I can have your help in doing so.