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Found 14 results

  1. Enjoy the amazing prey capture of a catapulting sundew. Short and succinctly (75 ms) but sensational. Meanwhile, we provide more than 120 thrilling videos on carnivorous plants on our (private and uncommercial) YouTube channel. Simply subscribe to stay up to date.
  2. Leucophylla dominant moorei hybrids seem to be a very intriguing group of plants, and this clone is no exception! S. x moorei 'Bouquet' looks totally like a pure leucophylla, except it has some outstanding red coloration mixed into it! The underside of the lid is dark red, as is the lip. There's even dark red veins that weave into the white pigments, giving it a very eye-catching contrast of bright and dark colors. This plant produces a profusion of pitchers that when clumped all together, looks like a bouquet....hence the name. Easily one of my favorite mooreis out there so far because of how eye catching it is. Note to all you out there trying to impress your significant other with plants: I would never in a 1000 years dream of making a bouquet out of this plant and giving it to my wife as a gift....she'll just say "didn't you just cut that off from the front yard?!" Sigh, no love or appreciation for how difficult it is to grow this stuff, imagine how much the plant is set back from such a harvest....maybe not the same response you'll get, but just sharing my experience :) Photos taken 9/8/16: Kinky lip: n
  3. During my college years, one of my best friends, Dr. William Ratcliff aka Will, grew out some seeds that he purchased from Orton's plantation in the Carolinas (I think he bought these around 2002 or 2003). We suspect these were wild seeds collected from private property, as they were only sold in lots of 1000 or more. Will graduated in 2005 and had to move to Minnesota for his graduate studies, so he graciously gave me all of his plants. At the time, I wasn't into venus fly traps so much, so the pot was placed among the Sarracenia. They were jammed into a 4" pot and neglected for more than half a decade! No repotting, no TLC, nuthin! Out of 50+ seedlings, only a few survived and it was clearly the strongest and tougest of the bunch. This goes to show this clone has great breeding potential since it tolerated such severe neglect. When I finally got interested in VFT's again, the pot was overgrown with weeds and smothered with dead Sarracenia leaves (it was late winter and time to repot!) In fact, the plastic pot crumbled into pieces when I picked it up since it was so weathered from the sun! Dionaea "Orton's Red Side" as I'll tentatively call it was repotted and "grown for Jesus." After the first year of recovery, the 3 or so main plants produced huge traps! This clone can turn reddish on the inside of the trap (like most venus fly traps), but what makes this individual stand out from the crowd is its ability to produce red pigments on the outside of the trap while still having a solid green petiole and somewhat green interior. Environmental conditions play a huge role in this phenotype, but it also seems to be genetically based. The petioles very long petioles and can produce decently large traps. Over time, as the "bulb" grows large, it'll split into 2 or 4 plants, and the back of the bulb will form a few tiny plantlets. You know you have a vigorous clone when it constantly divides on its own (reminds me of B52). The fact that it does very well outdoors here in Northern California says a lot as well:it seems only the most vigorous VFT clones do well for us here. Some photos, taken 8/7/15. What's ridiculous is how I've had this plant for years and didn't fully notice the unique characteristics until now: The exterior of the trap. Notice there are some "normal" clones from the same seed batch mixed in this pot: The plants "shrunk" this year because I let them flower. Some of the stalks were as thick as baby asparagus: These plants were enormous last year, I'll pinch off the flowers next year and see if I can get them giant. Here's a picture of after the flowers finished taxing the plants:
  4. Dear CP lovers, since 2007 the German Carnivorous Plant Society (G. F. P. - Gesellschaft für Fleischfressende Pflanzen im deutschsprachigen Raum e. V.) yearly publishes a calendar of photos of carnviorous plants taken by society members and also other skilled photographers printed in very high quality. Some of you surely know about this and have also purchased one or the other of these calendars. I´m happy tp present you the calendar for the year 2015: Please visit this page to see previews of the calender 2015 http://forum.carnivoren.org/index.php?/topic/37724-gfp-kalender-2015/ It´s 30 x 45 cm in size, printed on 250 g glossy photo paper, 13 sheets (title plus 12 months), process-colour printing, double loop wire binding with hanger, black back cardboard 380 g, transperancy film covering title Run: 300 copies Price: 12,50 EUR (equals £9,90). Available at: Kalenderversand [dot] GFP [at] gmail [dot] com (delete the brackets and spaces in front of and behind the "@" in your address line, please) :-) I have not activated Spam filters to make sure everyone who seriously wants to get a copy of the calendar will reach me via his email address. But I want to annoy Spam robots, I hope you understand. Shipment costs: 1 copy can be sent as extra large letter for 8,00Eur (£6,34) everywhere in Europe (also Switzerland and other non EU countries). 2 copies are best shipped as two extra large letters each for 7,00 EUR everywhere in Europe. 3 - 6 calendars need to be shipped as a parcel for 17,00 EUR postage inside European Union. Outside Europe it´s of course even more expensive! There are various zones for the rest of the world for the German Post with graduated shipment costs. For example one parcel (3-6 calendars) to the United States will cost 36,00 EUR. After mail order (email) you´ll receive a reply your order has entried. I have not installed an auto reply so it may take a couple of hours `til I reply. If you shouldn´t receive a reply from me within 48 hours please contact me here via pm. In that case I haven´t received your email order for what reason ever. By your order please give me the name (at least surname) of the addressee (most likely yourself) and his (your) full address including the country you live in. And please mention the number of copies you wish to have. Payment is possible via international bank transfer or by PayPal (additional fees are due - normally 1,9% to 3,5% of the total amount you transfer + 0,35 EUR). It´s necessary to pay in advance. I hope I have announced all relevant details on this calendar and how to get it. If not please ask me I´m a very patient man! ;-) The calendar is bilingual (German/English). You´ll see the abbreviations of the weekdays (Monday to Sunday) (upper line German, lower line English), the calender weeks below and the number of the days in the last line. All important German bank holidays are also mentioned. On the back side of the title you´ll find an imprint also in German and English which gives you an overview of the photos and the photographers and also details about the shown plant(s) and the location where these pictures were taken. *Uff* A lot of stuff to tell you. I hope you´ll enjoy the calendar. Kindest regards from the calendar team.
  5. Here's another site way high up in the mountains that's actually relatively small, but jam packed with plants! We nick-named it the mountain creek site because a creek runs right through the middle of the habitat and, well, it's in the mountains! Not really rocket science :) The plants here are absolutely outstanding, and many were producing very large traps. Here's the creek that gives the site its name: despite low water levels and record drought, there was still plenty of water at this site: Do you see the mountain the background? It's made of very porous rocks, and those rocks collect moisture. Because of the volume of rocks and spaces in between the rocks of this mountain, water collects like a sponge. Downhill (where the darlingtonia site is) water constantly seeps out from the mountain, and the beginning of the spring is where Darlingtonias grow: All of this water feeds down a steep creek, which eventually feeds into the river that goes to the ocean. At the bottom of this valley in the background is the creek: But let's go back to the site. "Ay, yo Rob!!!": remember all of those darlingtonias you killed in the past? Well, don't feel so bad, they also die out in the wild. Here are some skeletal remains and even some dying seedlings. Why are they biting the dust? My guess, in this instance, is heat stress. Usually, water diversion causes issues, but you can clearly see water in this photo: Further evidence of heat stress:recent burning of the traps: Rob tested the water at various sites, and the range was between 30ppm to about 70ppm. I believe this site was around 40 ppm (can't remember for sure). Salty water isn't likely the cause of death here: This was definitely a site to behold: Some red plants grow here too! Powdery mildew is common in the wild: Plants can form dense populations: What are Darlingtonias eating in the wild? I've been visiting sites for almost 2 decades now and have never opened one up, but I felt it was important for us all to see what's inside: cucumber beetles, and mainly flying insects. Notice the maggots at the top of the pile of dead bodies: what you can't tell is before the trap was split open, it was filled with this really nasty, rotting water! The maggots were on top of all the corpses so they wouldn't be under water:
  6. Way high up in the mountains, far away from civilization, Rob Co of the Pitcher Plant Project and I decided to go on a crazy hike in what seemed like an endless mountain range. Reaching the site requires an hour and a half drive from the closest town and a 2 mile hike in some challenging steep terrain. On the way to the site, if you drive too fast or lose control, you'll fall off a sheer cliff, so there's no room for error out there. The roads aren't labeled out here, and getting there requires a little bit of trial and error plus some luck. Before I continue this story, let me add that hiking out in these mountain ranges require being in decent physical shape...this is no roadside botanizing! For the record, I look slightly fat but am buff underneath that, LOL Rob is quite physically fit (I'd hire him as a security guard any day), and he had a hard time going up and down these mountains (although to give him credit, he was slightly sick, so that's probably what slowed him down). Because of the high elevation (this was probably around 6,000 feet (1,830 meters) above sea level, the air is slightly thinner, which makes breathing more challenging. The dangers are also a lot higher than your average roadside site. For one, if you have an emergency, it's an hour and a half drive to the nearest form of civilization. Another challenge is the seep is about 2 miles away from where you can park the car. When we packed our backpacks, we had enough food and water to last around 4-5 days just in case. We also brought basic materials for survival (waterproof clothes, warm jackets, lighters, knives, bear spray, etc). Lastly, everything out there looks the same. When you try to find your way back to the car, it's extremely confusing and disorienting. Be sure to bring someone with a very good sense of direction if you decide to hike out in the wilderness like this. While there are trails out in this breath-taking scenery, the actual seep doesn't have any official trail to it. You essentially have to climb up a mountain top, look in the distance, and try to figure out how to get there without falling off the cliff. Here's Rob Co on the way to the site: The trails out here are extremely confusing because they aren't maintained whatsoever: Some of the trails are overgrown to the point that it's hard to tell it's still there: The scenery out there is absolutely breath-taking! Notice how many of the trees are pretty much dead-this was caused by a massive fire many years ago: Everywhere you look, there's jaw-dropping views like this. Interesting how some of the most beautiful places on this planet are quite hostile: What you can't tell is how steep this mountain is. It was very difficult figuring out how to get down to the fen, which is in the distance: Can you see the cobra pitchers in the distance? Probably not possible from this photo, but you could see it in person: We caught the last flush of some azaleas in bloom. The fragrance was sweet like candy-it smelled better than it looks! But who cares about all that, here's what we came to see, Darlingtonia by the thousands! This field was quite massive and absolutely impressive: In this photo, I'm standing uphill, and water is percolating downhill. The bogs were mainly composed of decomposing tree trunks, grasses, sticks, and a peat-like substance. It sort of bounced a bit when you walked on it: There were a few ponds at this site: And the Darlingtonia grew on the edges of these ponds. Keep in mind, water was constantly moving here: Just loved this unique habitat. Notice how there appears to be oil in the water: these are natural organic oils produced from decaying plant matter(probably from tree sap if I had to guess): Some of the plants are literally growing submerged. Slightly off topic, there were deep potholes at this site, and I fell into one because it was covered by the grass. I was up to my waist in water. At the bottom was thick mud that was hard to get out of, but I clearly survived: There were mainly "regular" color variants here, but check out the shape and dark red tongues on these traps: Hard to tell from this photo, but some were gigantic: My hand for scale: But there were also some amazing color variants here as well, like this copper topped one: Extensive windows and nice colors: Outstanding color variants. Notice the top of the head on the trap in the background is brown-this is from sun burn (heat stress):