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Found 4 results

  1. Last year I took a trip to the northern portion of Michigan and the southern portion of Upper Peninsula. On the trip I encountered various carnivorous plants and orchids. Emmet County (Day 1): The first site was quite unique compared to similar sites I have been to. All of these plants survived in a narrow beach swale only a couple yards to a couple feet from the shores of Lake Michigan. In comparison, swales I have been to in the past were several hundreds of feet away from the shores of Lake Michigan and sheltered by tall sand dunes. Small colonies of Utricularia cornuta were growing terrestrially a couple yards behind the swale were the sand was moist. None of these colonies were growing as affixed aquatics as I had seen in the past. Utricularia intermedia was extremely common at this location. As the water became deeper I began to see more Utricularia macrorhiza. Either Platanthera aquilonis or Platanthera huronensis Mackinac County (Day 2): There were many swales similar to the one I had visited the other day but most of them were very small with no carnivorous plants or orchids. I was able to find what I believed to be some Utricularia gibba in a small pool that was actually connected to the Lake which was pretty interesting. As I traveled around, I did see some Cypripedium but all the flowers were cut unfortunately.Epipactis helleborine was very common along the forest trails. In a marshy area just hidden behind some trees I was greeted by a colony of Spiranthes romanzoffiana just beginning to bloom. Emmet County (Day 3): By this time I was a little frustrated because I was hoping to find some Drosera or Pinguicula vulgaris and it was just starting to drizzle outside. Upon parking I could see some Epipactis helleborine sheltered under the trees. The shores were just a short distance away and as I approached I finally found what I was looking for: Pinguicula vulgaris. A large colony was situated on the side of a pool and spilled over onto the trail heading toward the beach. There were also several colonies on the shores of Lake Michigan living amongst the rocks. Also among the Pinguicula vulgaris were some impressive clusters of Spiranthes cernua
  2. Hi, today i made a Fieldtrip to a population of D. rotundifolia and P. vulgaris in Germany. The Quality of the Pictures is not the best, but i hope you enjoy them. Greetings Manuel
  3. Hi, today i made a Fieldtrip to a population of D. rotundifolia and P. vulgaris in Germany. The Quality of the Pictures is not the best, but i hope you enjoy them. Greetings Manuel
  4. Irmgard and I are happy to introduce our new film. It's in the German language, but reading the English abstract below, things should be relatively clear. The mountain Brocken is well known in Germany, however, for an English translation we would choose the title: "Carnivores and whitches on Germany's legendary Blocksberg". In Goethe's "Faust" can be read, that witches meet on top of the legendary mountain "Brocken" (Germany, vernacular: Blocksberg) to sweep off the last snow before May. The area is now part of the National Park (NP) Harz, and also some species of carnivorous plants occur there. We received a filming permit by the NP authorities and we express our gratitude to Dr. Gunter Karste, who accompanied our film-tour into the secret mountain bogs. The film starts in the climatic spa Benneckenstein, including a short retrospect on the history of the Hartmeyer family, who lived here until their family enterprise has been unlawfully dispossessed by the communistic authorities of the former German Democratic Republic (GDR - Remark: After the German reunification it became family property again.). The Hartmeyers escaped to the western part of Germany in the 1950s, but the contact with relatives and old friends remained constant in time. A special thank goes to the Benneckenstein chronicler Jürgen Kohlrausch, who supported this film project from the beginning and who showed us some Drosera that grow not far away from Siggi's old native city in an area which is now called the "Green Belt". It sounds amazing, but where the former German zonal border existed with its strips of death and mine-fields, many endangered animal and plant species survived. Apart from urban sprawl and roadmaking, they found interestingly here a secure refugium.