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Found 5 results

  1. I was wondering how many people in this forum live in and around Bristol and would be up for creating a Bristol based group? The idea would be to meetup at each others houses, see each others plants, talk about the different species, give tips, swap plants etc. What do you think?
  2. Hi all, I was wondering how many people in this forum live in and around Bristol and would be up for creating a Bristol based group? The idea would be to meetup at each others houses, see each others plants, talk about the different species, give tips, swap plants etc. What do you think?
  3. All of the sites I've seen in Covington Co, AL are seepage slope bogs: water from uphill slowly percolates into an open field, and the area that stays consistently saturated is filled with Sarracenia. After visiting countless sites, one major observation was made: S. flava var. rugelii seems to be more tolerant of water-logged habitat in comparison to S. leucophylla. Perhaps the yellow trumpet pitcher plant has a different root system by which it can tolerate slightly lower levels of oxygen, but who knows. Of course, there are exceptions to the rule: anytime you have moving water, even if it's really mucky and boggy, S. lecuophylla can grow there. With all that in mind,the first photo below is an overview of a population of mainly S. flava var. rugelii. In the foreground, there's a dried up creek filled with tulip trees...it's too bad we didn't get to see them in bloom because those flowers are amazing! In the background, you can see a dense population of yellow trumpet pitcher plants. There's 2-3 main seeps that feed this bog: And as you can see, this site is dominated by S. flava var. rugelii: Homies in situ. I suppose on the other side of the pond, one would call them "mates" in situ: And here you can see how the plants grow from the water source. What you can't really tell from the photo is that almost every plant here is gigantic: Some huge lids: Same trap with my hand to sort-of show scale. My hand isn't as fat as it used to be, haha: This spot is really beautiful, although it was hard to find because it occurs in the middle of a forest that doesn't seem like it would be conducive of this habitat: A few beauties, although they were past their prime: S. leucophylla was also at this site, although they hadn't yet produced fall pitchers: And a S. x moorei just popped open: This one had an alien eye: WE found the very rare S. flava var. maxima here, and I'll post pics shortly once they're uploaded.
  4. Irmgard and I are happy to introduce our new film. It's in the German language, but reading the English abstract below, things should be relatively clear. The mountain Brocken is well known in Germany, however, for an English translation we would choose the title: "Carnivores and whitches on Germany's legendary Blocksberg". In Goethe's "Faust" can be read, that witches meet on top of the legendary mountain "Brocken" (Germany, vernacular: Blocksberg) to sweep off the last snow before May. The area is now part of the National Park (NP) Harz, and also some species of carnivorous plants occur there. We received a filming permit by the NP authorities and we express our gratitude to Dr. Gunter Karste, who accompanied our film-tour into the secret mountain bogs. The film starts in the climatic spa Benneckenstein, including a short retrospect on the history of the Hartmeyer family, who lived here until their family enterprise has been unlawfully dispossessed by the communistic authorities of the former German Democratic Republic (GDR - Remark: After the German reunification it became family property again.). The Hartmeyers escaped to the western part of Germany in the 1950s, but the contact with relatives and old friends remained constant in time. A special thank goes to the Benneckenstein chronicler J├╝rgen Kohlrausch, who supported this film project from the beginning and who showed us some Drosera that grow not far away from Siggi's old native city in an area which is now called the "Green Belt". It sounds amazing, but where the former German zonal border existed with its strips of death and mine-fields, many endangered animal and plant species survived. Apart from urban sprawl and roadmaking, they found interestingly here a secure refugium.
  5. Hi all! I'd like to make a video with lot of people (from around the world) presenting their own carnivorous plants and put it on youtube, in order to share this FASTASTIC PASSION and make it even more popular! So, here's the idea, to make a short short short video of you with ONE carnivorous plant in your hand, or near you, saying: "Hi, my name is [yourname] and this is my carnivorous plant!" That's all! You can also use the language of your country (italian, english, some slang...), this will make it even cooler! SO if you think it is a good idea, feel free to send your little video @ this email: [email protected] or upload to some filehosting (like mega) and send the link to me! I'll download that and let you know when the video is ready to be published! P.S: I'm not gonna put any advertising on it, I don't want to earn money from that! What do you think?