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  1. Serre par olive&co, sur Flickr Dionaea Muscipula par olive&co, sur Flickr Dionaea M. "UK Sawtooth 2" par olive&co, sur Flickr Graines dionaea par olive&co, sur Flickr Double piège Dionaea M. par olive&co, sur Flickr Double piège Dionaea M. par olive&co, sur Flickr Dionaea M. "ICPS 2004" par olive&co, sur Flickr Dionaea M. "ICPS 2004" par olive&co, sur Flickr Dionaea M. "Shark Teeth" par olive&co, sur Flickr S. leucophylla -- red Tube,Perdido, AL x S. flava var. atropurpurea -- all red tube,Blackwater River State Forest, Florida par olive&co, sur Flickr Dionaea M. 'B52' par olive&co, sur Flickr
  2. The original site where S. leucophylla hurricane creek white used to exist in the wild was plowed and turned into a pine tree plantation. While I never saw the original site before it was destroyed, I had heard it was a huge field filled with plants! The original site had many normal S. leucophyllas, but a few plants displayed the blinding white traps that we are fortunate enough to have preserved in cultivation prior to the site being destroyed. A lot of people probably are wondering, what does this site look like today, and is there anything left? Surprisingly, there is still a tiny little patch remaining to this day, but it is slowly being overgrown by the surrounding shrubs. Are there any super-white plants left? Sort of, but nothing like what we have in cultivation. 2 years ago when we first spotted this relic patch, there was a little opening in the shrubs (which were much shorter at the time) and you could walk in there and see quite a few plants. This little clearing had a decent amount of sunlight. As of 2013 (2 years later), that open patch is now filled with thick shrubs, and there's no way you can even attempt to walk in there! All of the plants that were once receiving decent light are now etiolated and shaded. Many only produced phyllodia. Will this patch survive in the long run? IF a fire comes through, or someone clears up the shrubs consistently, this relic site can potentially last a long time. However, the landowners clearly aren't interested in preserving these plants, and as is, the site will likely persist for a few more years at best. In the case of the S. rubra wherryi Chatom giant site, in 2004 (?), the population was in the same situation: they were heavily shaded by thick shrubs and struggling to survive. As of 2013, we didn't find a single Sarracenia in the original Chatom giant site. There were also gigantic S. psittacinas that used to grow there..these were also all gone. While I remain optimistic that the little hurricane creek patch may persist for a few more years, I remain skeptical that it will last through time. Photos of what remains of the original hurricane creek white site. This will likely be one of the last documented set of photos of the site before it disappears forever. It's damn hard to find, I'll tell you that much! Keep in mind, this used to be a field, but is now thick shrubs that eventually turn into a non-native forest (pine plantation) behind them: You used to be able to walk in here: Still, we did find an impressive hurricane creek white plant here and there: Most of them, however, looked like regular leucos, or relative white regular plants: They may be starving for light, but they sure aren't starving for insects! In two years, this will likely turn into thick brush: Actually, some beautiful and interesting plants are still alive: you can tell this is a relative of hurricane creek white: Decent hurricane creek white plant: The dark green and contrasting white is what makes hurricane creek white so unique. Most other populations don't have that characteristic:
  3. This population of S. alata from Stone Co, MS is probably the largest, most dense population of Sarracenias on the planet! The bog stretches for as far as the eye can see, and the forestry service religiously burns this site every year (from what I could tell). I saw many tree stumps, which means they are removing trees to keep the forest from shading the meadow. When we visited this site, it was incredibly dry, and most of the fall pitchers were turning brown from water stress. The site was really dry...when I dug into the sandy substrate, it was barely moist. I saw a few pitchers wilting from the lack of water, but fortunately, it looks like it should rain in that area pretty soon. The good news is this site is the healthiest Sarracenia population I've ever seen. Everywhere you look, there are seedlings, which is a great measure for the health of any population of plants. Despite the water stress, this site will likely continue to thrive for a long time, especially in light of how the forestry service is managing them. Here's some photos: The largest trap I could find in the field was almost black and almost looked like a fish's face, haha: Side view of the same clone-this thing was BULBOUS: Some brand new fall traps-these will turn solid red when the temps. cool down in the late fall/early winter. If you see any red on the new traps, you know it's a dark clone: A nice clump: these plants were hard as hell to photograph with the full sun we were having. They're especially hard to photograph the darker they are. Notice the new traps are less red than the older traps: Another beautiful red clone: A nice ornate/veined clone: It smelled like dead animals in this field because there were so many traps filled with insects. Keep in mind I have a sensitive nose: This one will probably turn black: A beautiful, standard lemon-green clone with nice shape. You can see how many insects it's already caught, and this trap looked perhaps 2 weeks old: This trap was probably a bit older than the others, which is why it's so red:
  4. This summer was quite hot and sunny in Germany and the Sarracenia were really happy with this. On many plants I got the best colouration ever, especially with the different red tube varieties of S. flava. But lets start with a very beautiful S. x’Linda Butt’ S. flava var. rubricorpora ‘Burgundy’ MK F26 S. flava var. cuprea ‘runder Deckel’, a simple but very beautiful clone. S. flava var. atropurpurea, Marston Exotics, 1999, MK F174 S. flava var. ornata, Wewahitchka, MK F42 S. x moorei ‘Timothy King’, MK H225 That's all for now, but there are more pictures on my blog: michaelscarnivores.com kind regards, Michael
  5. Hi all, Some pictures of my collection... H.néblinae H.heterodoxa, grand sabana H.nutans H.nutans x ionasii H x tequila N.ovata N.spectabilis N.nigra N.jamban N.sibuyanensis N.x ventricosa 'créme' N.maxima, lake poso N platychila N truncata x sibuyanensis N.lowii x campanulata N x tiveyi N.robcantleyi N.truncata N.ovata N.villosa N.flava x sibuyanensis N.rebecca soper N.truncata x ephippiata
  6. While S. rosea var. luteola and S. purpurea ssp. purpurea f. heterophylla are well known amongst collectors, S. purpurea ssp. venosa 'Antho-free' is almost unheard of. Very few people in the world have this plant. Interestingly enough, this is a man-made plant, and my understanding is there has never been an AF S. purpurea venosa discovered in the wild to this day. Another peculiar aspect of these all green venosas is that they sometimes have folded hoods just like montanas. Under optimal conditions, the plant turns bright yellow, and sometimes the traps get bleached out from the sun and have almost a slight white tinge to them. There has been some speculation as to whether these are montanas, but I don't have enough info to support or deny such a hypothesis. What I do know for sure is that these plants are down right amazing!!! S. purpurea ssp. venosa Antho-free, photos taken 8/4/13:
  7. Hi, after selling some of my plants on the forum with a saleslist, I decided to put up a small online store. It is now online at michaelscarnivores.com. I mainly offer Dionaea and Sarracenia, which are propagated from my collection plants. For the shop opening there are some special sales which will be available for a reduced price until 15.07.2013. In the future I also plan to use the blog function to show some pictures and reports of my collection. Kind regards, Michael Ermel
  8. It isn't the best job in the world., but the southwest open days are coming up in a week or so (22nd/23rd June) and I thought it was best to get rid of the seedlings that don't make the grade before people see them. Sarracenia 4, 120613 by John Jearrard, on Flickr These are six years old now. I went through them two years ago and threw most away, but there are always a few I'm not sure about, and it has taken another couple of years to make sure they don't make the grade. If I was more ruthless I could have saved myself a lot of space and trouble. Plants that aren't quite good enough at four years old are still not quite good enough at six. Sarracenia 6, 120613 by John Jearrard, on Flickr In the end I kept about a quarter of them (and I think I have a few duds still among them). It's a difficult job. Those that have survived this far will be watched and anything that starts to be disappointing will be out. Sarracenia 11, 120613 by John Jearrard, on Flickr And a quick picture through the greenhouse - there are plenty still left if you're coming to the open day!
  9. The latest addition to my cp collection, Sarracenia "Scarlet Belle", arrived this morning. I think I'll let it settle in for a few days before I move it from the 2 inch pot it's in now. Not very scarlet at the moment, but it is a young plant and has been in a cardboard box for a few days. S. "Scarlet Belle" Regards, Ian.
  10. Hi there, usually I´m repotting my Sarracenia´s every year in spring to let them have good condition to grow. Now I have read, that this is not the best for them, every repotting disturbs their growing. After repotting a small seedling in autumn it stopped growing and producing tubes. I heared, that the right time to repot is only, when the plants are getting too large and needs more space. The problem for me is, that every spring, when I repot them, the peat at the bottom of the pot, that stands in water all the time, is rotted and smells like this. I can not imagine that this is healthy for the plants! And this is after 1 year, how does it look like after 3 or 4 years? I use only rainwater. Please, could you help me with your experiences to help me with this? Thanks a lot, regards, Mike
  11. Hi all So I am the owner of http://www.youtube.com/fnglazz I started the channel itself a few years ago, but a couple of years ago, I started uploading carnivorous plant videos that I have filmed. The idea was to share with the world why exactly I find these plants so damn cool. It has grown and grown and now has over 230 subscribers and over a million lifetime views. The reason why I am posting this here though is because I am hoping that any of you who have carnivorous plant videos will share them so I can put them on my channel. In return, you will obviously get credit and a link in the description of your choosing as a way to increase traffic to which ever site you choose. So if any of you have videos you would like to share, please do. Only two conditions: 1. The video is of reasonable quality 2. Either mute or no background music (normal background sound is fine though) I started my fascination with these plants when I was about 8 years old. Now I want to show the world why we CP enthusiasts find these plants to be so damned cool. I hope I can have your help in doing so.
  12. Hi there! I have some plants refusing to do anything this year. They only send some little phyllodia, and thats all. Rizome is healthy, but plants refuses to do anything but very little phyllodia, and no traps. (One of the lazy leucos only give me one well developed trap, and anything else. The rest of the lazies, nothing but small phylodia. Just like if they were in a dormancy. I have some suspects about what can be happening. 1-All this plants where buyed this winter/spring to a grower in German. He is a very well known and reliable grower, so I don´t have any trouble with him. But its important because of the location and climate. 2-All of these non growing plants are "warm" Sarracenias. I mean, Sarrs that naturally grow in southern locations (minor and leuco). I have "cooler" Sarracenias from the same growe, as purpureas, and they are doing very well. 3- Last winter was specially cold in Germany. 4- All other plants (even the same specie as the lazy ones I have from several years, or plants purchased this winther/spring to "warmer" places than Germany in winter are doing really good! So I think those plants have suferefed of extreme cold this winter, (southest sarrs like cool winters, but not to cold). and they sould be in a kind of shock. They behave as if they were still in dormancy (even in this rare hot and sunny summer we had here). Now in october I see a little more growing in one of those minors. Is it aweking now in october? Well, the thing is I am tempting to take the littles ones like psittacinas or minors (I can´t put a leuco indoor) that have refused to grow this summer indoor, under light (Hi power cob-LED lights. I grow Helis with them. Extremely bright.) to push them to grow. Yes, I know that is probable they will grow next spring. But, hence they have been in dormancy from 2011 November till now, I am thinking about making them grow indoors until mid spring, to link with the natural growing season, and them take them out. Letting them "sleep" next winter. They are southest sarras I am planning to do that with. With (I think) not a need os a strong dormancy. (But, I know still necesary) Minor and psittacinas (Not all my minors, neither all my psitts.). In part because I want to see this plants growing at last, in part because of experimenting, Do you think I am making a really big dissaster here? Another question for you. It is known that little seedlings (of sarrs an VFT) can skip dormancy for one or two years). Can I do de same whit the VFT plantlets that grow from the mother plants?? . My bigs VFT are sending out some tiny VFT plants from theirs sides, Just wondering if i can put them under lights and skip dormancy as if it were a sedling. Thanks.
  13. Hi all, I have three different clones of Sarracenia alata together with three bits of location/description data, but I am unsure which belongs to which as over the years they have been mixed up! I'm hoping some of you here will be able to help out with a positive ID? The clone descriptions are: Sarracenia alata - Jackson MI Sarracenia alata - red throat 2 Sarracenia alata - heavily veined in throat, W. Louisiana Here are example photos of the three clones (see below for my personal findings)... S.12 Plant: S.12 Pitcher: S.12 Flower: S.15 Pitcher: S.15 Pitcher: S.16 Pitcher: S.16 Flower: My notes/findings: S.12 has a very pointed hood to the pitcher, which cannot really be seen clearly in the photos (I can try and get a better one if it helps?). It develops no noticeable redness to the underside of the hood/pitcher opening and has limited venation. S.15 has a definite waviness to the hood edge. Strong red colouration under the lid and many veins. S.16 has a definite bulge to the top of the pitcher just before the opening. Strong red colouration under the lid and many veins. This clone grows very tall and although not noticeable in the example photo above, the pitcher lid is almost at a right angle to the back of the pitcher, i.e. creating a flat topped C-shape profile when viewed from the side (I can get a better photo if needed).
  14. Hi, could anybody give me a clue as to what I have here? We bought this plant from a UK garden centre a few years ago (before I really got into CPs). They were selling it as a pond plant. We planted it next to our pond for about 3 years but its condition deteriorated quite badly so this year I dug it up, split it and after potting left it in the greenhouse. Since then it's actually turning into quite a nice plant. Unfortunately the label it came with just says Sarracenia, which I could just about work out for myself. So, any ideas? The second question is what is that gunk that's growing in the corner of one of the pots? I thought it could be some kind of mould, it looks a bit like a layer of wet sugar, is quite hard but it doesn't respond to anti-fungal spray. So far it's only turned up in 1 out of the 4 divisions and doesn't seem to be having any detrimental affect on the plant. Thanks Gaz the biggest division... better view of largest pitcher the gunk stuff more of it
  15. Hi there! Here you have a ton of pictures of my plants. This year they are doing well in general, in spite of the late waking up because of the cold spring. Well, I don´t have any garden, nor a greenhouse, so my plants depends on the wishes of the weather, so I can´t have plants as beautifull as most of you, but this year we had a nice summer and plants have coloured up properly! The plants displayed in this pictures are outside all year round. Sorry, there are no particular order in the pictures. All species are mixed together, the picturs don´t follow any special order. Feel free of asking whatever you want to know about my growing conditions or whatever! Plants are all labelled, but Sphagnum has overgrown the labels and you can´t barely see them. I have to trim it of. Click on the pictures to enlarge them!! JULY To be continued!
  16. Stu

    S16 Pitcher

    From the album: Stu plant's

    Sarracenia alata

    © Stuart Keeler

  17. Stu

    S16 Flower

    From the album: Stu plant's

    Sarracenia alata

    © Stuart Keeler

  18. Stu

    S15 Pitcher2

    From the album: Stu plant's

    Sarracenia alata

    © Stuart Keeler

  19. Stu

    S15 Pitcher

    From the album: Stu plant's

    Sarracenia alata

    © Stuart Keeler

  20. Stu

    S12 Pitchers

    From the album: Stu plant's

    Sarracenia alata

    © Stuart Keeler

  21. Stu

    S12 Flower

    From the album: Stu plant's

    Sarracenia alata

    © Stuart Keeler

  22. Stu

    S12 Plant

    From the album: Stu plant's

    Sarracenia alata

    © Stuart Keeler

  23. Well done to Andy "Loakesy" for his winning entries in the allotment show, especially winning the cup. I also had bit of success in our Horticulture Society show earlier in the month. No cup for me unfortunately (only cash prizes of £1.50 & £1.20 ) but it was great to get the appreciation from non-CP'ers. I normally enter runner beans, courgettes and marrows but hadn't been able to grow any vegetables this year so, like Andy, I had to come up with an alternative. I had one or two interested enquiries about the plants and this seems like a great way to promote CPs to a wider audience. (Click photos to enlarge) 1st prize 2nd prize both together with other entries (Apologies for the quality of the D capensis photo, it was too dark in the village hall without flash and with it there was too much reflection from the "prize label") cheers Gaz
  24. Hi all, Just a quick question regarding a couple of my Sarracenia pitchers. I have noticed a kind of deformity on the lip of some pitchers where it seems it hasn't opened out/rolled over properly when growing. The photo below shows an example on an S. × moorei. It has also happened a lot on my couple of S. oreophila clones. My question is what is/has caused this? Is it stress due to division at the start of this year and will recover next year or is it something else, such as pest damage? Thanks in advance.