Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Darlingtonia californica'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Carnivorous Plant Retailers
    • UK Carnivorous Plant Retailers
    • EU Carnivorous Plant Retailers
  • General
    • Forum Announcements
    • Introductions
    • Forum Feedback
    • Competitions
    • Forum Auction
  • Societies, General Information and FAQ
    • European Carnivorous Plant Exhibit & Exchange 2019
    • General Carnivorous Plant Discussion
    • Carnivorous Plant Societies
    • Open Days & Events
    • Carnivorous Plant Websites
    • FAQ
  • Indoor & Outdoor Cultivation
    • Bog Gardens
    • Dormancy
    • Greenhouses - Cultivation & Equipment
    • Propagation
    • Sustainable and Peat-free Cultivation
    • Terraria - Cultivation & Equipment
  • Carnivorous Genera
    • Brocchinia & Catopsis
    • Genlisea
    • Pinguicula
    • Pitcher Plants
    • Pseudo & Indirect Carnivorous Plants
    • Spring Traps
    • Sundews
    • Utricularia
  • Photographs of Carnivorous Plants
    • Carnivorous Plants in Cultivation
    • Carnivorous Plants in Habitat
  • Non- Carnivorous Plants
    • Aroids
    • Cacti & Succulents
    • Orchids
    • Other Plants
    • Sphagnum
  • Open Forum
    • Talk About Anything

Blogs

  • CPUK Administrator
  • Andy Collins' Blog
  • ihatov1001's Blog
  • guillaume59's Blog
  • Daniel G's Blog
  • Sundew Grow Guides Update
  • Bacchanalia
  • themrdave's Blog
  • I don't know how my Ping puts up with me
  • midge's Bloghgyhg
  • Shoultsy11's plants and what I want
  • Odysseus' Blog
  • NateCarnivore's Blog
  • NateCarnivore's want list (USA)
  • cam2045's Blog
  • The greenhouse quest
  • Nepenthes Lowii's Blog
  • gricey's Blog
  • Yossu's Ramblings
  • Pirate.radio.dj's Blog
  • plantescarnivores.net
  • Yunzi's Blog
  • SHOPPING
  • Wholesale Halloween Costumes
  • Heliamphora TC blog
  • dimentia research
  • tobacco shops near me
  • mens sherwani pakistani
  • Tax classes online
  • sea buckthorn oil
  • cognitive neuroscience
  • cool leather jackets

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 10 results

  1. Hi I have been growing two pots of mature sized cobra lilies since March in London and they have been thriving both on my balcony or windowsill, produced half sized mature stolons. But ever since around July the new leafs on the smaller one begin to blacken, then the entire plant begin to soften and collapse. I would have thought that survived the heat wave. Now there is no sign of growing and i can't seem to find pest, which I was thinking it could be spider mites. (above)this is before they started collapsing and dying: new leaves are tall and healthy. I was quite amazed by how fa
  2. Having started my Carnivorous Plant journey (some ten years ago) by growing a handful of plants outdoors (due to lack of a greenhouse at the time), I've now returned to displaying a few plants outside; in a couple of newly set up bogs... A Darlingtonia haven on the left, and a mixed species bog on the right: The Darlingtonia are in a very watery/soupy mix of pure Sphagnum & rain water, and has a solar-powered airstone at the bottom to create a bit of oxygenation - in full sun the water really bubbles away! The Belfast sink bog, consists of S. × 'Maxima', S. purpur
  3. Deep in the mountains, perhaps a good hour drive on dirt roads out in the middle of nowhere, Rob Co of the pitcher plant project ( http://thepitcherpla...oject.com/blog/ ) and I reached the peak of a mountain, and knew the plants were around here somewhere. Thing is, the habitat completely looked wrong: there were sheer cliffs, and it really didn't seem like there were any streams or water sources nearby. So many unmarked dirt roads veered off the main dirt road. Was that the right one to take, and did we just drive by the site? Doesn't look like even trucks can make it very far on these s
  4. Here's another site way high up in the mountains that's actually relatively small, but jam packed with plants! We nick-named it the mountain creek site because a creek runs right through the middle of the habitat and, well, it's in the mountains! Not really rocket science :) The plants here are absolutely outstanding, and many were producing very large traps. Here's the creek that gives the site its name: despite low water levels and record drought, there was still plenty of water at this site: Do you see the mountain the background? It's made of very porous rocks, and those rocks colle
  5. Way high up in the mountains, far away from civilization, Rob Co of the Pitcher Plant Project and I decided to go on a crazy hike in what seemed like an endless mountain range. Reaching the site requires an hour and a half drive from the closest town and a 2 mile hike in some challenging steep terrain. On the way to the site, if you drive too fast or lose control, you'll fall off a sheer cliff, so there's no room for error out there. The roads aren't labeled out here, and getting there requires a little bit of trial and error plus some luck. Before I continue this story, let me add that
  6. During the fall, Darlingtonia californica (the cobra lily) can change colors from bright yellow to dark red, and mixtures in between. Sometimes, if stressed, the windows can change colors as well. In the wild, we found a few individuals that under normal conditions consistently produces red windows! We searched the site carefully and only found maybe 2-3 plants that displayed this unique characteristic. I visited this same site in 2010 (?) and at that time, we thought the red windows might just be an environmental thing. However, upon seeing the plants again in 2013, the same individuals
  7. This site is unique in the sense that it occurs in a chaparral habitat. A chaparral habitat is a community of plants consisting mainly of short, dense shrubs. In california, you will find a lot of manzanita, some madrone, caenothus, sage, etc. growing in such habitats. This plant community will eventually become very thick, and relies heavily on fire every 2-3 decades or so to clear out the vegetation and allow new growth to resume. Many of the seeds in this plant community will only germinate when burned .A chaparral habitat is much like a Sarracenia habitat in the sense that it relies on
  8. Darlingtonias typically grow on hillside seeps high in the rocky, nutrient poor mountains. If they're found in a forest, the trees are usually either stunted or dying due to the harsh environmental conditions. However, one site has been discovered in the middle of the forest, which is a completely anomalous place to find cobra lilies. For a cool video and even more photos of darlingtonias in the wild, check out Rob Co's famous The Pitcher Plant Project: http://thepitcherpla...rip-2013-day-1/ I visited this site in 2010, and according to Damon Collinsworth of California Carnivores and Harr
  9. While exploring Darlingtonias with my friend Rob Co, we found a site in Del Norte Co, CA that seems to be isolated from the rest of the populations that are normally found in the area. This is found at around 5,000 feet above sea-level, so I suppose it's considered a montane habitat. Fortunately, it hadn't snowed yet, so we lucked out and were able to see this site. In previous years, snow prevented us from being able to see the higher elevation plants. The site was extensive, and if I had to guess, there were probably more than 20,000 plants here. IT seems when they put in the road and
  10. Are there really red darlingtonias out there, or are they only red when they're small seedlings? HOw about plants with red bodies and yellow tops? Are there bronze colored Cobras? Is there a such thing as a giant Darlingtonia that can reach the size of a baseball bat, if not slightly bigger? Are there variants of Darlingtonias with an abnormal amount of windows on them? IS there a huge diversity of "tongue" shapes? HOw about "teeth"-do some darlingtonias have them? It may shock some of you that the answer to ALL of these questions is YES! here's a giant plant. One thing I observed