Aljo

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About Aljo

  • Birthday 12/17/1950

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  1. There doesn't seem to be any mention of this species on the site, but it seems that it might be carnivorous to some extent. does anyone know any more about it? "Mentzelia pumila is covered in minute elaborations known as trichomes, which pierce and trap insects that land on it." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mentzelia_pumila
  2. The ancestors of carnivorous plants already had the ability to digest chitin as a defence against fungal infection, so they were pre-adapted to evolve carnivory. http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?/topic/58711-how-plants-evolved-into-carnivores/
  3. "...researchers have found that meat-eating plants the world over have hit on the same deadly molecular recipe, even though they are separated by millions of years of evolution." https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-plants-evolved-into-carnivores/
  4. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26646-first-carnivorousplant-fossil-is-40-million-years-old.html?cmpid=RSS|NSNS|2012-GLOBAL|online-news#.VH-KA4usV8E "Researchers from the University of Göttingen in Germany found the fossil of two leaves from the plant in the Jantarny amber mine near Kaliningrad, Russia. It seems to be related to plants from the Roridulaceae family"
  5. Aljo

    Newbie in Liverpool

    Hi everyone, I discovered carnivorous plants as a child when I came across some wild sundews in the Lake District, but apart from a VFP once I have never grown them, despite being keen on gardening. However, I recently went to the Tatton Park Flower Show, where Hants Fly Trap had a stand, and I liked the look of their S. Juthatip Soper x leucophylla, so I bought one, and it has been catching enormous numbers of flies. When I got home I had a look on their website and decided that i would buy some others from them. But first I started collecting bottles of rainwater and read "The Savage Garden". I love the photo on the paperback version, it looks like the plant might be about to take the woman's fingers off! It is very interesting, but it is not always clear which species are happy living outside in the North of England. Anyway, I have now bought the following additional species: Drosera aliciae, binata, rotundifolia, pulchella x ericksonae Cephalotus follicularis Dionaea B52 Sarracenia minor, purpurea, xBrook's hybrid. I was tempted to buy more but I think I should gain a bit of experience first - the Cephalotus seems not to be a good choice for a beginner but it is a wonderful plant!. These are now growing on my South-facing patio in a tray of water, apart from the Cephalotus, which seems to prefer a little less water - I am not sure if this would be better indoors or outside in the summer? I also have an unheated greenhouse (mainly containing cacti and succulents) and south-facing windows in the house that I can use for anything that would prefer it.