Johanovich

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Everything posted by Johanovich

  1. So what soil should one use for N. villosa and N. inermis? I have both and I'm curious if I could improve on their conditions
  2. I tested just cooling the water below the floor and the sphagnum mat on top of it really blocks the heat exchange. Also the main difference with floor heating is that the heat will naturally rise, while cool air tends to go down. The cool water running over the pots of the villosa and macrophylla (the two pots that are hanging on the left wall) ensures that they are cooled the most. Also, I like the "natural" look of the water running down.
  3. Closest thing to burbidgeae x macrophylla is the trusmadiensis x burbidgeae, which is probably going to be a real fine hybrid. For me, I'd like to see inermis x vogelii, attenboroughii x hamata (or any other really toothy nepenthes) and aristolochioides x edwardsiana. That should yield some interesting results!
  4. I cleaned off most of the algae with a brush and installed a filter (which has a carbon and ceramic filster inside) in the terrarium to fix some part of the algae problem). I also made sure that the wall dries completely some hours before the lights come back on to make life as hard as possible for the algae. If they do come back I think I'll just have to scrub them of once in a while. Yeah sure here are some photographs of the terrarium: The whole terrarium. On the right side you can see the chiller which is connected to the terrarium through the isolated tubing. You can just
  5. Hi guys, I have a question for other terrarium keepers. First allow me to describe the situation: I have a highland terrarium which has an aquarium cooling unit to cool the inside temperature at night. The terrarium has a water basin at the bottom, which has a pump that channels the water through the cooling unit. After the water is cooled by the unit, it goes on through a tube and flows out at the top of a cork wall inside the terrarium. A fan blows air over this flowing water to cool the air inside the terrarium. The cooling unit and pump are on during the night (obviously) so the wa
  6. It is actually a lack of wax in those spots. Because the wax is missing (and is slightly white) the areas appear darker and often more shiny. No idea what the exact trigger is for the production of these spots, but it seems more than one species can produce them.
  7. Welcome to CPUK, always nice to see other people from Belgium!
  8. As the title says, my male ventricosa "alba" is flowering. If anyone is interested in some pollen, shoot me a pm.
  9. https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/13599431303/in/photostream/ looks like N. truncata to me, but could also be a hybrid.
  10. No I understood what you meant, I wasn't trying to imply that you were asking for some of it. Like I said before, sadly I do not have any material. Otherwise it would be able to compare it with U. striatula.
  11. Just a scientific discovery. Didn't think of grabbing some with me at the time ;) Yes it does seem to have a lot of similarities with U. heterochroma, although the flower is different and I didn't notice any hairs on the plant. In fact it was a bit unclear how the plant was anchoring itself to the substrate. As the habitats are quite similar it is not unlikely this is a just case of parallel evolution.
  12. Accidentally double posted the topic. Mods could you delete this topic please?
  13. My apologies for the bad focus. It was in a bit shady conditions and I didn't have much time.
  14. I found the other photographs: Flower: And the plant turned over:
  15. Hi Guys, I want to utilise the expertise that some people on cpukforum have of Utricularia species. In 2010 I came across a species of bladderwort in Tanzania in the rainforest. I do possess some taxonomical expertise myself, but not in plants. Yet I haven't seen any species so far that resembles the exact phenotypic layout of this specimen. So I was hoping that someone on this forum could enlighten me. Did I come across a new species? Also I should mention that this species was growing in a thin water film on a rock so it's actually part aquatic and part terrestrial. Here is a photograph o
  16. Hi Guys, I want to utilise the expertise that some people on cpukforum have of Utricularia species. In 2010 I came across a species of bladderwort in Tanzania in the rainforest. I do possess some taxonomical expertise myself, but not in plants. Yet I haven't seen any species so far that resembles the exact phenotypic layout of this specimen. So I was hoping that someone on this forum could enlighten me. Did I come across a new species? Also I should mention that this species was growing in a thin water film on a rock so it's actually part aquatic and part terrestrial. Here is a photograph o
  17. I've milled some Sphagnum too for some Nepenthes seeds. It worked ok, except the Sphagnum apparently wasn't completely dead and started regrowing and overcrowding my seedlings. In regards to the Sporotrichosis spores: interestingly the fungus itself has never been found on live moss, only the spores on dried sphagnum
  18. I think that's easily the largest amount of ceph flowers in one room that I've ever seen! Very nice and most impressive.
  19. Wow those look really nice. I especially like the second one.
  20. Allright I'll try sowing the seeds directly in the crevices filled with some medium. Thanks for the advice!
  21. Here are a few pictures of the glass used as a topping for some D. scorpioides gemmae that have just started growing. I tested it in growing medium pretty much in the same way as sand and it worked perfectly, but as sand is cheaper I'll probably only use glass as topping in the future. Here are a few pictures of the glass used in the medium from last summer (with Drosera binata, D. capensis, D. intermedia, D. rotundifolia and a D. aliceae cutting) The D. aliceae cutting in newly mixed medium And the same cutting after a few weeks. It had been standing outside during the summer so s
  22. Hi everyone, I am currently in the process of finishing my terrarium and I was wondering if D. burmanii could be kept as an epiphyte. The back panel of the terrarium will be a large plate of rough cork bark, in which I plan to make a few holes that can contain some growing medium. Could anyone enlighten me if D. burmanii has long or large roots and if this is even possible? Has anyone perhaps tried this already? Grtz, Johan
  23. You can also use fragmented glass instead of sand. It's sold in some stores as filter material for pools. I've used it both as a topping, to prevent moss and other stuff from growing, and as part of the media itself. In addition it also looks nice as a topping and provides some extra glitter between the plants themselves. It's basically the same as sand, being almost pure silica.