Forbes

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Everything posted by Forbes

  1. New pictures from Sunset Peak: http://aldrovanda.com/drosera-oblanceolata-sunset-peak
  2. Nice to hear that the pictures are of interest. Neil, Do you recall where you found the Nepenthes? Judging by the sand, I'd say it was north of Hac Sa beach (the bus terminus) going towards the Westin hotel. This site is south of Hac Sa. I'll have to check out Pokfulam Reservoir sometime; handy that it's so close to Central.
  3. I'm not sure why this posted twice. Please delete...
  4. Recent images from Coloane Island in Macau: http://aldrovanda.com/macau-carnivorous-plants
  5. Recent images from Coloane Island in Macau: http://aldrovanda.com/macau-carnivorous-plants
  6. Thanks guys. It's really tiny compared to the U. bifida I've seen before; is that an early season thing or is the general size of the species that variable?
  7. Could anyone help with this Utricularia from Macau? It's growing in a seep that runs over granitic-looking rocks near the beach on Coloane island. Drosera spatulata and Nepenthes mirabilis are also present. Terrible image, I know. Apologies to anyone with easily offended visual sensitivities... Hard crops of the first two images (I didn't have the extension tubes with me):
  8. February Darlingtonia I've put a few new photos of Darlingtonia at 8 Dollar Mountain online. This time from February (of last year... These things take time). Check out http://aldrovanda.com/eight-dollar-mountain-darlingtonia-californica-wetland-in-february for images and verbiage.
  9. Thanks. Nice to see they've provided some amusement.
  10. I've put a few photos of Drosera and Utricularia from Thailand's Phu Phan National Park online at aldrovanda.com. Thought someone might find them interesting.
  11. I do believe I've found a few photos of U. ramosissima from a trip to Thailand a couple years ago. No photos of the plants or habitat, I'm afraid, only flowers...
  12. lacps.net The Los Angeles Carnivorous Plant Society website moved to a new url a few months ago and I've recently revised the coding. If you have an interest in California CP clubs, please check it out. If you don't, well, you may still want to take a look at this page for a cool field trip report on Venezuelan CP.
  13. The site says Pop/Rock. I just stumbled upon the website and found if fascinating that such an ensemble would be named after something as nerdy as a CP.
  14. It appears that this French band is named after a certain New World CP: http://www.groupedarlingtonia.com/ Has anyone heard them in concert?
  15. Thanks for the report. Was S. flava the only species with a predilection for tobacco? Did you find any specimens rolling their own? Good thing there aren't any CP in the Solanaceae...
  16. A few photos from one of my favorite Darlingtonia locations. This particular fen is near the terminus of a complex of seeps leading down the southwest face of $8 mountain. The first plants in the colony are located rather high up the mountain, scattered here and there amongst a jagged assemblage of ultramafic debris, and the last are within spitting distance of the Illinois River. At this time of year sunlight seldom breaks through the clouds, but when it does, it is often accompanied by rain. The light is often beguiling, yet also far more fleeting than I might desire.
  17. S. alata, Tyler Co. S. leucophylla, Leah Wilkerson Bog, North Walton Co., FL S. alata "Maroon Throat" S. leucophylla, Washington Co., AL
  18. Darlingtonia californica, $8 Mountain, Josephine Co., Oregon.
  19. Drosera lowriei from Ravensthorpe WA Drosera auriculata from Bathurst, NSW Drosera stolonifera subsp. porrecta Drosera andersoniana Drosera x obovata 'Ivan's Paddle' Drosera cistiflora "alba" from Gifberg, RSA Nepenthes ventricosa x TM (what on earth is "TM"?) Heliamphora heterodoxa x ionasii more photos: http://forbesconrad.com/galleries/cp/clubs...all-nojs-0.html
  20. I knew you'd appreciate the irony.
  21. Late last month I stopped at the notorious bog on California's Mendocino coast on my way to better preserved areas. Between rain showers I only had time for a few photos but thought y'all might enjoy. S. leucophylla: S. purpurea subsp. venosa: More S. leucophylla. The top photo is artificially lit, the second not. I know which I prefer but if you like one better than the other, I would be interested to know which holds your favor. More photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/byblis/
  22. Cephalotus: Dionaea 'Fused Tooth' Drosera enodes: Dionaea 'B 52': Pinguicula cyclosecta: Pinguicula oblongiloba x moctezumae Drosera macrantha: Drosera bulbosa: More photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/byblis/ LACPS website: http://www.geocities.com/lacps/
  23. Jim, I think Ivan usually propagates them on sphagnum. I tend to put D. x obovata cuttings on sphagnum peat, but have floated them in water too. The new plantlets usually develop faster in terrestrial environs.
  24. Thanks, guys. For the record, I've been alerted that the original posting contains an egregious typo: Faye Wray's name is misspelled! Jim, 'Ivan's Paddle' is indeed self-fertile, but just barely. Don't expect to flood the world with seeds.