blaasjeskruid18

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Posts posted by blaasjeskruid18


  1. Keith Wilson has an open day which is always very rewarding to visit http://www.hungryplants.nl/openday.htm
    Other than him and Gert's http://araflora.nl/ there aren't many proffesional growers you can visit. Carniflora is huge but not open to the public.  In Belgium you have Killian and the EEE.
    So far the events that are known in the dutch ''Vleesetende Planten'' group which right now is the most active carnivorous plant organisation in the Netherlands are these:
     

    Saturday, 28 March 2020

    Sunday, 5 April 2020

    Monday, 1 June 2020

    Saturday, 27 June 2020

    Sunday, 5 July 2020

    Saturday, 11 July 2020

    Saturday, 3 October 2020


     

    I know that the dutch organisation Carnivora has an event in the Hortus in Leiden on 9 may, and events in Amsterdam, Delft and Utrecht (2x) but those dates are unknown. Carnivora is not as active as they used to be. But in general, during half june till half august allot of people are on summer holiday so the events are rare


  2.  I can't really remember where I read that, but something comparable was written in The Savage Garden:

    ''Some species of pings also have the power of movement. This is most often seen in species from temperate climates; it is almost entirely lacking in tropical forms. Over a period of a day or so, after the capture of substantial-size prey, the margins of the leaf, already upturned, may curve inward or over the precious food. This has nothing to do with capture but is believed to be helpful in preventing the digestive fluids from drooling off the leaf. Another possible explanation is that it helps prevent the victims from being washed away by the rain. Many butterworts can even ''dish'' their leaves under prey, giving their juices a convenient place to pool.''   

    http://www.sarracenia.com/faq/faq5440.html gives another explanation though:

    ''For the most part, there is no motion in the leaves. However, the leaves do often dimple slightly underneath captured prey, possibly to create a little pool of fluid to aid in digestion. Also, and especially on temperate species, the leaves roll up on the edges. A few theories have been proposed to explain this, and perhaps two of the most intriguing are that the leaves may be curling up to keep marauding ants from stealing the captured prey, or to create a kind of tubelike structure along the edges of the leaves so that capillary action spreads the nutrient-rich bug juices over a larger amount of leaf area, enhancing nutrient absorption.''

    I guess science still isn't sure why they do this

    • Like 1

  3. That's the point. If someone submits an early picture with ruler of a large trap then that will discourage anyone else from entering the competition if their trap is smaller - thus effectively ending the competition early. The way Trev has done it this year should result in more entries, as entrants will not know the size of the other entries, and the winner only known at the end of the competition.

    I agree, You are gonna get exited by the pictures that others made.


  4. uhhhmmmm.... well, the main problem is in that i don't know how Netherlands' weather is right now.... here it's warm, so i would repot the plant and no problem... Anyway, if the container is so small Brocchinia's suffering, you better change it. Personally, i would suggest you could use the same soil suitable for Heliamphora, so 30:20:20:30 sphagnum:peat:bark:perlite. By the way, 50:50 perlite:peat will do well :)

    The weather was very cold and rainy here, but today it was suddenly very warm and sunny. The roots are growing out of the pot, so yeah...

    anyway, thanks.

    • Like 1

  5. It is quite wet indeed, When I maked the foto's I gave them water. The last time was 4 months ago (It was a litte bit water, but maybe as you say it was too much this time). The substrate is a special cacti mix. I Think the big one needs amputation. Does the little one not die if I'm gonna give him a amputation?

    PS, the cactus on the last foto is 3 years old en the big one is even 7 years old.


  6. Hello,

    today I saw some cheap Cacti (€0,80 each) at my florist. I'm wondering what species they are, and what species my old cacti are. Here some pics:

    Cactus 1:

    9grw1nK.jpg

    Cactus 2:

    8ynte3M.jpg

    RfttEh4.jpg

    together:

    GEzvBh7.jpg

    My old cacti (It isn't healty at the moment, just look at it. Has someone advise?) :

    WxoVw1C.jpg

    Big momma :chiffa::

    cTT51jx.jpg

    The others are growing normally, but any advise for better grow and/or more healty plants is welcome.