Jump to content

brad

Full Members
  • Posts

    180
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by brad

  1. Ivo, That is such a neat photo. Thanks for showing it. Looks to be budding right off the side of the flower stalk. Phil, I agree, VFT will bud from basically any place on the plant. The white leaf base is not the only part of the plant that is easily propagated from. It seems the whole plant can be used for propagation. I have seen VFT bud from the flower (pistil and sepal), the flower bracts, the flower stalk, the trap, the trap connector, the petiole above ground, the petiole below ground, the leaf base (rhizome), and everywhere in between. It is time to try a root without any attached rhizome. Brad Ventura California
  2. I have finally propagated Dionaea from flower stalk cuttings after years of no success. I imagine that there are inhibitors at work. So I tried a completely new technique. I just shaved the basal bracts off of the flower stalk so they could bud on their own. I removed these bracts while the flower above was in bloom, careful not to disturb the flower so I can still harvest the seed. I placed these in RO water about 3 weeks ago, and now you can see that they are nicely budding out. I like the water propagation method because it allows the cutting to get maximum light from all angles. I also believe that waiting until the flower was developed allowed the bracts to be maximal size so they were a nice size to propagate. The flower bracts are where the thin pointy little leaves arise at the base of the flowers. VFT Flower Bracts 3 weeks after removal, budding in RO water. Brad Ventura California
  3. Superb color, form, and condition. Beautiful pictures of a great collection. Brad Ventura California That is how VFT should look when they break dormancy.
  4. The best method, which will also save you a bit of money and hardship, is to just germinate and grow the seeds directly under the florescent lights. Any germination setup more complex than florescent lights, pots, peat substrate mix, and water tray, is just too complex. Good luck, Brad Ventura California
  5. Nepenthes Nut, that is very interesting information regarding liquid nitrogen. I will have to read up on that. I think pollen and seeds can be stored that way too. I need to do some reading. Jason, also you could just bag up the entire plant, pot and all, and put it into the kitchen fridge. That would slow things down and give you some more time. Again, good luck. Brad Ventura California
  6. Keep the flower stalk on the plant as long as you can. When you must finally clip the stalk put it in water, fully immersed, a plastic bag would work. Put it in the kitchen fridge. It will last longer than if you hadn’t put it in there. Seems like you need to plan a bit better. Good luck. Brad Ventura California
  7. brad

    Weird Traps,

    I think Alexis and I could both be right. It really depends on what feature we are discussing. I believe the older very deformed mature traps with the markedly deformed petioles are pest attack or something worse. But the new growth with the leaf buds seeming to be bent to the side, this is OK and within normal limits, as Alexis seems to be discussing. Anyway it never hurts to look closely for pests, especially aphids or mealy bugs. The new growth seems to be OK for now. Just keep observing. And again, good luck. Brad Ventura California
  8. brad

    Weird Traps,

    Looks like an aphid attack to me. It is something bad for sure. I would hope it is aphids, for they are easy to cure. Everything else that could cause this would be a worse enemy than aphids. Look for aphids they are easy to spot, at least one, of the many you may have. Good luck, Brad Ventura California
  9. Very nice VFT collection. It looks like you have room for one more VFT pot. I like the way most CP start the growing season with nice large traps and or flowers. Your well grown VFT display the good start nicely. Thanks for the photos. Brad Ventura California
  10. brad

    Trap colour

    VFT traps can begin to develop the red trap color before opening. Well grown healthy VFT in good light will begin to develop the red inner trap coloration well before opening. This is easily seen from the outside, looking at the developing trap you can see the red coloration of the digestive glands through the outer trap wall. Later as the trap nears maturity but still has not opened you can just peak inside and see the red color is definitely present. Also before opening the outside of the trap will occasionally show some red color. Then over the next several weeks to months the red will often continue to gradually deepen and get much more brilliant and darker in color. Regarding your VFT, it could be an All Green, keep watching for lack of red color. The evaluation of VFTs characteristics, must be done on well grown healthy plants. Your VFT does not look like a VFT in acceptable form to reliably evaluate all its characteristics, especially color. Give it time and allow it to grow well and you will be able to see its true color and form. Brad Ventura California
  11. brad

    Cold Dionea

    You did not describe your plant, and you did not provide a photo. So I took a guess, that repotting the plant may help it. If your Red Dragon VFT is not growing well, it is not due to California weather ie “cold”. So I am not convinced warming it up in a terrarium is the best therapy. It may help, you never know. Regarding “repotting”, it is just the best way to see the condition of the rhizome and roots, they must be healthy. If VFT are not growing correctly. Investigation is needed. A look at the plant, the whole plant can tell you a lot. Good luck, Brad Ventura California
  12. Those Sarracenia flower photos are beautiful. I like the color and compact symmetry of the rubra gulfensis flower. I think my rubra flowers are red outward and yellow on the inside, which yours seem to be too. Brad Ventura California
  13. brad

    Cold Dionea

    I would consider repotting your VFT. Right now (April 5), VFT grown outside in California should be in very strong robust growth. If the plant is of flowering size, a flower bud should be at least just visible, or possibly the plant is well on its way to flowering. If you have a VFT, which you value and is growing outside in California, and is currently not in strong growth. Repot it now and cross your fingers. This is for California only, and you must grow your VFT outside below the elevation of 4,000 feet. If you have recently repotted the VFT, it may still be in transplant shock, so the above including the repotting will not apply. Brad Ventura California
  14. Varun, Great to hear the VFT seedlings are coming along fine. Regarding the cycling of good and bad VFT growth you are experiencing. It is very difficult to determine the cause. The cause may have passed, which would be good. If it was due to microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, algae etc.) this too may have passed and things will be good now. But these organisms flourish in all our collections and especially in Terrariums. But terrariums allow the bad factors more of an advantage and the VFT a handicap. For instance if the small blackening leaf bud is a fungal infection (black leaf rot), high humidity and lack of air circulation will help the fungus. VFT do not need high humidity to thrive but most fungi do. If it is due to microorganism toxins, a closed watering system will just concentrate the toxins at the time they are being released. If it is due to microorganism rapid growth phase using soil oxygen, a close watering system will not allow for a bit more oxygen. Terrarium growing can be very successful and very rewarding, but it does not allow much room for error, that open growing systems allow. Brad Ventura California
  15. When a VFT trap captures an appropriate size insect it is always beneficial to the plant. Whether it is winter, spring, summer, fall, before, during or after flowering. Brad Ventura California
  16. brad

    Trap colour

    The variables under which VFT produce nice red traps are many. One variable is good light. But even with good light it will often take 4 or even more weeks to really redden up nicely. It is a slow process. Under stress or without stress and very rapid growth VFT do not seem to color as well. Regarding determining All Green VFT. You just have to watch them closely, often for a whole year in very good growing conditions to see if they ever try to turn a bit red. If they do they are not an All Green. Henning von Schmeling told me the only reliable way he could be certain, is that the flower stalk at the base does not turn red in All Green VFT. This is true on my All Green VFT. Again, you better wait until at least blooming before you decide it is an All Green. If a VFT flower stalk base turns red then you don’t have an All Green. If the VFT traps turn red then you don’t have an All Green VFT. It is a difficult process of careful observation and exclusion. Brad Ventura California
  17. Aidan’s advice is perfect. 1. You are observing transplant shock. This is basically unavoidable, but worth the set back. 2. The VFTs which tried to flower in addition to transplant shock, the grow point must begin to produce leaf buds again. This recovery can take a long time. This is basically a double shock, 1. Transplant shock to the roots and at the same time under significant stress the grow point must recover the ability to form leaf buds. Aidan’s advice is perfect. Brad Ventura California
  18. In undrained conditions eventually something goes sour within the root zone. I call this water stagnation, for lack of a better term. It could be build up of minerals, it could be build up of microorganisms including algae, it could be any one or combination of substances which are toxic or semi toxic to the roots, it could be lack or relative lack of oxygen. VFT thrive when the water quality at the root level is good. Adding pure water to a cesspool will result in unhappy roots. It is the QUALITY of the available water in the root zone not the amount of water. Remember VFT can thrive in near aquatic conditions, I grow some of mine this way, so it is definitely QUALITY not quantity. VFT do not do well in technically closed water systems, ie undrained conditions. A Pot in Tray water system at first glance appears to be a closed water system, and it may be. But the Pot in Tray water system works so well, because when water is added to the tray, basically a relatively large volume of pure water is provided to the roots, this will dry or nearly dry and you add again. In a true closed system like a terrarium, the volume of water added to the root zone is relatively less and there is concentration of toxic substances. The above is very confusing. So instead of trying to figure out why VFT grow poorly, just grow them well in the first place which is much easier. 1,2,3. 1. Sphagnum Peat based inert soil mix, 2. Pure Water, 3. Strong Light. Easy. Everything else is confusing. Brad Ventura California
  19. Those are shock traps. During development of that or those leaves the plant experienced critical stress. Most probably to the roots, but it could have been any of a hundred bad things. Stress to the roots, growing point, or the leaf itself. Water, soil, root zone problems, temperature, pest damage etc. I doubt it is a routine light issue, as VFT will either stretch up and out with long etiolated petioles in poor quality long daylength light or will respond with wide petioles in poor quality short daylength light. Those are aborting shock traps (especially the first picture). They may eventually grow and recover somewhat, or if they begin to blacken they will stop there. Problem is that the damage could have been done weeks ago, so determining the cause can be difficult. With VFT and most plants, observing its current condition can tell you a lot. If there is new healthy growth then things are much better now. But shock traps can be an ominous warning that something could be seriously bad in the overall growing conditions. Most probably it is just a rare stress event that just happens, hopefully so. Good luck, Brad Ventura California Fixing a bad VFT is easy as 1,2,3. Any VFT placed in 1. peat based media, given 2. pure water and 3. strong light will grow perfectly. If your VFT are not perfect go back to the basics 1,2,3. Repotting is fun.
  20. Hi, Long Beach California has among the best climates for growing all genera of CP outside year round, obviously including Dionaea muscipula. If you live behind the Peninsula you may have to actually worry about too much heat for potted plants during summer heat waves. As you know the Long Beach Airport area can be 10 to 15 F hotter than most coastal areas. So not only is your climate ideal, heat may be your true enemy. Growing outdoors in full sun would be best in your area. Growing indoors in a terrarium would be the worst choice, with the only benefit of possibly having to water maybe 10 times a year depending on ventilation. A better choice than a terrarium would be to grow them unenclosed under florescent lights, however you will have to water about 2 times per week, maybe more if the growing area heats up especially in summer. Again, with possibly the best growing climate on the entire planet, growing outdoors is obviously the best option. Regarding humidity, VFT can tolerate any range of humidity, so humidity is not an issue unless you purposely try to fry them with heat above 90 F and humidity below 20% long term. Regarding temperature VFT grow great at 75 F, with no reason to go higher than 85 F. Healthy VFT will tolerate hard freezes and extremely high temperatures. Be careful of temperature extremes if you grow VFT in small pots. Good luck, Brad Ventura California
  21. Both Dentate and Red Dragon grow in the classic pattern of VFT during the annual growth cycle. Late spring and summer long upright petioles, late summer and fall prostrate rosetted growth, typical winter growth for the species, break dormancy with prostrate rosetted growth. Both Dentate and Red Dragon definitely go rosetted at the appropriate time of year. The original Dentate is a wild collected plant. Red Dragon is the result of a selfing of a wild collected All Red VFT, so very close to a wild collected plant. (wild plants can be selfed, even in the wild.) Anyway regarding annual growth patterns, both Dentate and Red Dragon are Typical. Brad Ventura California
  22. Ivo’s are in peat moss, so transplanting will be easy. If in sphagnum moss, you will need to grab closer to the seedling or grab the seedling itself. In both peat soil mixes or even sphagnum moss plantings, if the seedling is small enough, just using a toothpick you can poke around and under the plant and up root it, without grabbing the plant itself. Like uprooting weeds in a garden. The problem plants will be the larger ones which will sink the root and its root hairs deep into the strong sphagnum moss, these will have to be teased away with more effort, but still care is needed to not damage or break the root. After doing the first 3 or 4 seedling transplants you will be an expert. Ivo has thousands to transplant, he will be a master. Brad Ventura California
  23. Wet the media real good. To avoid getting the seedlings wet, get a deep tray and raise the water level enough to get things very wet. Or top water off to the side of the sundews to get the soil nice and wet. Then using tweezers, or narrow forceps (pointy tweezers) stick the tips about 1 or 2mm into the peat substrate at the base of your first sundew, then gently and slowly tease it out with some peat if need be, without breaking the small root. Then do the reverse by making a narrow hole with a toothpick or other thin object and plant it into its new wet soil. Very easy stuff. Good luck, Brad Ventura California
  24. The wide leaf petioles with the serrated margins are an indication of low light intensity. Your VFT seem to want stronger light. Brad Ventura California
  25. Nice photos, your CP collection is doing nicely. The seedlings seem to be off to a very nice start. Thanks for the update. Brad Ventura California
×
×
  • Create New...