Apoplast

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Minnesota, USA
  • Interests
    Winter growing sundews, and a bit of the rest.

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  1. Hi Dave - While I am glad you have a soil mix that works for you, I am a little confused by your posts when taken together. I do agree that the quality of peatmoss varies which is why I rinse all my peat as I indicated in my description of the soil mix in my first post. Your response to that indicated you thought that too few nutrients was part of the problem. Then in your last post you suggested the solution might be to replace a portion of peat with milled sphagnum, which if anything is lower in nutrients. I guess I am a little confused because your diagnoses seem entirely contradictory.
  2. Hi Dave - Good to hear from you. You might be correct that the low humidity is causing a wicking effect and exacerbating the solute issue. I disagree completely that pygmy dews don't like peat (I don't grow wooly dews, so I won't speak to that). It is true that many pygmy dew species grow in soils with fairly low organic content in situ. However, it is equally true that the conditions under which plants grow in habitat are not necessarily those under which they perform best. For a carnivorous plant example compare the conditions in which Byblis gigantea can grow in habitat to the loose, r
  3. Hi Ada and Berkay - Thanks for the responses. I thought I should address some of your concerns about the pygmy dews. Though they are small, the produce shockingly deep tap roots for their size. I've pulled up dead ones that had intact roots 10 cm long! They develop these roots pretty quickly from the gemmae. It is true, though, that the media might have been a bit dry at the surface, however; I kept it damp for the first two weeks. I'll go back to misting it daily to keep it moist for a wile longer. About the peat, I rinse it to reduce the solute concentration and decrease the likelihoo
  4. Hello all - I've been running into a problem (or problems) with some of my sundews recently. I'm fairly new to the hobby as I have only been growing carnivorous plants for a little over 5 years. There are two groups of plants having issues, which may or may not be a related problem. First, I've never excelled at growing pygmy dews, despite how much I enjoy them. My first go round with them resulted in the loss of a couple of species, but I've still maintained the remainder. I recently purchased some gemmae in hopes of expanding the species richness in my care. The gemmae arrived quite he
  5. Hi Manders - Good to know! It makes it even more appealing that if I can get some plants flowering I could help out folks all over. Hi Silverman - True enough. I understand the basis of the concerns, but appropriate implementation in ways that achieve the important goals without hindering other efforts is always going to be problematic.
  6. Hi Manders - Well, at least I don't feel too foolish for not knowing. International restrictions do make things a challenge. I feel as though the availability of all CP's is better in the EU than here in the States. However, that may just be a perception of the grass being greener on the other side of the pond, if you will. Can you not ship pollen internationally? I thought it was only prohibited with CITES 1 species, making it possible for most neps. Seems like I should read up a bit more on CITES as well. Thanks again for your replies, they have been greatly appreciated!
  7. Hi Manders - Thanks for the information. Fantastically helpful! It sounds like it is going to be a challenge and I should pick one species to begin with, which will better allow me to grow the numbers necessary. Though I do grow my plants under artificial light, I'm pretty good about varying the daylight seasonally (though not as good as a local CP grower I know who has programmed his lights through a controller he built to perfectly mimic the sinusoidal day length variation at a chosen latitude). I go to the effort of modifying the day length for my plants to synchronize dormancy in some
  8. Hi Silverman - Thanks for the tips on which species are easier to grow! I have to be honest though, I'm not actually interested in all neps. I am sure this will draw ire from some, but I find most neps look dull, uninteresting. It's the big reason I've never grown any before. They've never really appealed to me before. There are just a few that are exceptions in my eyes, and that I would bother to grow. The list I included previously is darn near all of them. Hi James - Nope, they aren't for a windowsill. I grow my plants under lights in a basement. I'm currently setting up two cham
  9. Hello all - I am branching out. Moving to the dark-side. I have decided to try to grow some neps. The sticking point for me is the dioecious nature of the genus. I like species (I'm not interested in hybrids), and I like to share my plants with others. I enjoying knowing I can make seed from the plants I grow and share the enjoyment these plants bring me. I suspect it is no mystery where this is going. I'd like to grow several individuals of just a few species, but I want a chance at getting both genders; whether that be finding a good source for fresh seed, a nursery that grows or TC's
  10. Hello CPUK. I don't often post here, and largely lurk. But I posted something about my concerns for successfully cultivating my imminently arriving U. mannii to the ICPS forum. It was pointed out to me that those with the proper experience are typically found here. I have included the other post below, but in essence I would like to hear from successful growers of U. mannii about their cultivation techniques. Any advice would be most welcome. Thank you all for your time, whether simple reading this comment or for forthcoming assistance! ----------- Hello all - Let me start out by sayi
  11. Hello CPUK. I don't often post here, and largely lurk. But I posted something about my concerns for successfully cultivating my imminently arriving U. mannii to the ICPS forum. It was pointed out to me that those with the proper experience are typically found here. I have included the other post below, but in essence I would like to hear from successful growers of U. mannii about their cultivation techniques. Any advice would be most welcome. Thank you all for your time, whether simple reading this comment or for forthcoming assistance! ----------- Hello all - Let me start out by sayi
  12. I just wanted to express my appreciation for the selected species epithets. If it was you who did the convincing then, thank you Fernando! I love it when people get creative with their species epithet descriptions. If ever I am in a position to name a species, I may just have to call Fernando for some advice. In all seriousness, I would also like to congratulate the entire team for all of the wonderfully detailed, and much needed work on this group of plants.
  13. To all of you Yanks out there from the Upper Midwest: A small but dedicated group of enthusiasts from the Twin Cities have been meeting for over a year and have decided to make it official. We have formed the Upper Midwest Carnivorous Plant Society, or UMCPS. If you are from MN, IA, ND, SD, northern WI or da UP this group is for you. As those of you from the area know, the population density in the area is often low, providing few opportunities to meet and speak with other "local" enthusiasts. Meetings are held in the Twin Cities, but the UMCPS intends to operate across the regi
  14. Hello all. I have been following this forum for a while now, but decided to join in the discussion. I have been growing carnivorous plants for some time. I am interested in several genera, but I am most drawn to the winter growing Drosera from SW Australia and the Cape region of South Africa. Thus far my growth areas are in divided sections of my basement. Greenhouse someday. I hope. I am a plant physiologist by trade, but do not directly study carnivorous plants. Oh well, maybe someday.