tropicbreeze

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tropicbreeze last won the day on December 29 2020

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  1. "Progress" is detrimental to some but benefits others. Looks like under the changes Drosera auriculata were among the winners.
  2. A lot of Ficus are used in Bonsai, that might be what you're looking for. Ficus oinkinowensis, however, tends to be small and shrubby naturally. Otherwise Ficus are usually fairly large.
  3. One of the early wet season Drosera, part of the Petiolaris Complex. Interestingly, in an area about 1 kilometre long by 100 metres wide (between canopied woodland forest and wet season inundated ground) it almost carpeted the ground and was the only Drosera present. Habitat: generally open area with very little or no canopy, soil a sandy loam with lateritic gravel sometimes with scattered larger lateritic rocks.
  4. @Luis I went through ll the photos but there weren't any habitat photos amongst them, sorry.
  5. They all come from different places, say within 50 kms, so there is variation in the appearance of the habitats. I'll go through photos and see what I can find.
  6. I like Drosera early in the morning when the dew is heavy and the sun starts to come onto them. Great photos.
  7. Just off the top of my head there's also leptorhyncha, nivea, and minutissima. And if you want to go extra small there's simmonsii.
  8. I've often wondered about effects resulting from road construction. The run off water has motor oil and micro particles of wearing tyres. There's also erosion and sedimentation resulting from the earth works which continues for some time. None of that can't be good for these delicate environments. We need the roads and we need the environment. It's a delicate balancing act.
  9. The M. beccarii I found had spines on the caudex which apparently is unusual for the region they were in. I never did an extensive search through the area so don't know whether those were just a small isolated group. I have found Dischidia in Papua New Guinea which were ant plants. In Australia I've only found Dischidia nummularia which wouldn't be an ant plant.
  10. Possibly no one currently active on this site grows them but I do come across mention of some of them on other forums, infrequently though. I have found Myrmecodia beccarii growing wild but have never tried to grow it myself.
  11. Nice plant. I've never found white flowered plants. Only those with mauve flowers.
  12. Cplover, this is an extract from the herbarium publication on floodplain flora of the Darwin region: "In Australia found in W.A., N.T., Qld, N.S.W. Grows in shallow fresh water, often being caught on floating debris. In the N.T. localities include Arafura Swamp, a swamp at Pukitarmarloo Point (Bathurst Island), Fogg Dam, Girraween Lagoon and floodplains of the Finniss and Reynolds rivers." But I suspect it's more common than that. Problem is it prefers permanent water but that is where you'll also get crocodiles. People don't usually like poking their heads into places like that so lots of plants are probably not seen. I haven't seen any around, but I'm always very careful around water and don't take unnecessary risks.
  13. Thanks Karsty, I should have seen that myself. The name has been edited now. This morning minimum was 17.2C with relative humidity 92%, maximum this arvo was 34.2C with relative humidity 28%. Clear skies and sunny all day with light winds. Pretty typical for this time of year. I hear the UK has been getting hammered with dry/drought conditions, above average temperatures and bush fires. Not what you'd expect.