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ihatov1001

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Posts posted by ihatov1001

  1. Hello Adam

    Hi, thanks so much for your advise. It is so helpful for me.

    I'm relived to hear that D. roraimae isn't so difficult to grow as I have never grown any South American sundews.

    But it seems to be a little problem for me to keep the temp. above 10C during winter.

    I got to think how to sort it out by the cold season arriving.

    As for your 'cooled box', what a marvelous idea it is!

    Best Regards

  2. Hi everyone

    Some time ago I bought the seeds of Drosera roraimae from Best Carnivorous Plants. Then they are now germinating and forming small seedlings.

    Seeing their germination, I browsed through the Internet to look up the information about this sundew but I couldn't find so much but a lot of beautiful photos of them at tepuis.....

    So anyone who has experiences to grow Drosera roramimae, please give me any tips. And I'd also like to know how to treat the plants during winter.

    I used dried sphagnum for the seedbed. Now the temperature here is between 35C and 25C, which is quite hot but the pot of the seedlings is under half-shade. And in winter here the temp. is down to - 5 C.

    Thanks a lot

  3. Hi thanks again. I'll probably put the pots of D. glanduligera with pigmy sundews together during winter. In my region the lowest temp. is more or less a freezing point. So it should be OK! Then I'll think of bringing artificial light system for the sake of low sunshine in winter.

    D. glanduligera is growing together with my tuberous Drosera inside a cool greenhouse. I use an electrical frost protection to avoid that temps are dropping below freezing point. Last winter we had about -16°C outside, and the temps inside dropped down to 0.8°C. That night-conditions close to freezing point were also very good for the well growing tuberous species and also D. regia, D. arcturi and Drosophyllum. Due to low sunlight during winter, I add a 400W metal halide lamp for 9-10 hours per day to provide enough light, which is also important. And yes, without nutrition the plants can actually not develop healthy.

  4. Hi Tuberous D

    Thanks so much for your method too! From now on I'll put my pots of D. glanduligera under scorching summer sun. Then during the hot term do you give some moist to the soil or should it be completely dried?

    Best Regards

    Everything that Siggi_Hartmeyer posted in his reply is very good advice and very true! I, too, have found that glanduligera does not like high temperatures and needs to be fed often in order to flourish.

    My method for germinating this species is identical to tuberous drosera. Sow in June and leave the pot in a place that will experience high outdoor temperatures all summer long. Let them bake! Protect your sown pot from rain that might wash away the seeds. This can be under an eave, piece of furniture, etc.

    Put the sown pot in a water tray in September. The soil should be constantly damp from this point onward. The seeds will start to germinate within a month after they have experience a prolonged period of cooler days and nights. A steep temperature drop at night (at least 15 degrees) will help them germinate.

    In general my glanduligeras grow from October/November until after flowering in April/May.

  5. Hi Siggi_Hartmeyer

    Thanks for your detailed information. It is really helpful! And What a beautiful photo it is! I hope I will grow my plants like them.

    Through your method now I know temperature control is really important. During growing term in winter do you keep the plants in green house under temps controlled? And the idea of feeding plants is also something new for me!

    Best Regard

    For Northern Hemisphere: sow in June. Germination takes place after the first cool nights (>8-10°C) in October. Now keep very humid with night temps not higher than 5-8°C. Temp. down to 1°C is very good. If night temps. are above 8-10°C for some nights, they will flower too early and die soon. Day temps are best between 15-25°C. And you must feed the seedlings two times the week from the beginning with either living springtails (Collembola) or fine fishfood flakes, using a forceps with magnifier. This method is hard work, but successfully. The photo is from my collection, using the above method.

    Drosera_glanduligera_2010_1web.JPG

  6. Hi everyone

    I recently got seeds of Drosera glanduligera from ICPS seeds bank. And I would like to know the tips for the cultivation.

    Actually it is the second opportunity for me to grow this drosera. My first try was about 3 years ago with only 20 seeds. One day in January I found 5 buds germinating one year after I had sewn the seeds. Then only 2 of them could grow, and I obtained about 50 seeds from them in May. However, an accident occurred (typhoon winds blew the pot!!) and I lost all the seeds after all.

    In my very short experience, Drosera glanduligera seems to be very weak at hot weather and it probably was the cause I couldn't make all the plants grow. Anybody who successfully grows this drosera, please let me know how to grow Drosera glanduligera.

    Best regards

  7. Quickness of germination is dependent on temperature.

    And if the gemmae are not fresh, you may take some more time to see their buds.

    In my experience flatter-shaped gemmae like D. pulchella could take more time to germinate than round-shaped ones like D. scorpioides.

    So I would say between a couple of days and 1 month.

    Good luck!

  8. Quickness of germination is dependent on temperature.

    And if the gemmae are not fresh, you may take some more time to see their buds.

    In my experience flatter-shaped gemmae like D. pulchella could take more time to germinate than round-shaped ones like D. scorpioides.

    So I would say between a couple of days and 1 month.

    Good luck!

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