maxxima

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Everything posted by maxxima

  1. As time passes I am dreading the upcoming peak summer month(s) when the night time temps will be consistently too high in this corner of the world. This is always the worst time for me, I much prefer the winter. I've never seen the cold kill a plant (even a D. Capensis) but the heat destroys everything and it gets worse every year... At least it looks like I will be able to collect seed in case they don't make it through the heat. I sincerely hope they make it since I am very fond of them. They both started flowering at the 1 year old mark. The bigger one (with the aluminum foil) is from another grower and even though it's a few months older, it's flowering later, almost a month of difference. Maybe it's from a higher elevation ? Also there seems to be minor differences in flower spikes but I can't say for sure until they have fully formed. I was hoping to cross pollinate them but looks like they either won't overlap or they will but for only a few buds.
  2. So this summer I had 5 plants. At the peak of summer I was watering them every 2 days and apparently it wasn't enough because I lost 3 of them. The remaining two plants I watered every day and they survived. My media is mostly mineral so what worked for other growers (ie watering less) didn't work in my conditions. It was interesting to observe that they shrank to almost half their size during the hottest months. Little dew (althought they kept catching) and they lost their upright claw-like form. Then we had a week when there was very strong morning dew (everything looked wet like it had just rained) and they almost doubled in size with big droplets of dew and went right back to their upright form. It was amazing to see how they reacted so positively to morning dew. Here they are now 3 months later.
  3. In my experience: keep them warm, lots of light, air current (no stagnant air or too much humidity), very wet (pot standing in water like sarracenia). Also almost all mineral media with or without just a bit of peat seems to work best. This is until they grow about 6 leaves and then they don't need to sit in water, you can just keep them moist like a house plant, but don't let them dry out.
  4. This plant seems to be a magnet for little nocturnal moths, I have to admit I find it almost a little sad. It also recently caught a big damselfly, must have been an accident ? What a horrible place to consider resting on...
  5. Yes exactly. The area I'm in right now is getting very hot. Aluminium foil makes a difference of about 10+ degrees in soil temperature and makes a more stable change.
  6. Totally forgot how successful this plant is...
  7. So happy to have this magnificent species once again after 8 years...Last time I had 5 adult flowering plants but all of them died when I had to go on a workshop for a month, the plant keeper had them too dry. Once again I have about 5 young plants. This time I'm experimenting with media, temperatures; reading articles online and trying to have more control over their growth to find the perfect conditions. I am also in a different region now (hotter) so things are already different.
  8. Found a picture of my plant when it was much younger, amazing how it has changed.
  9. Thanks Dicon. Would you share pictures if you ever get the chance ? I've made some research online and found both squat and elongated plants. I do wish mine were squatter though. For me only the first few pitchers of the season (summer) are squat and the rest are taller. Maybe it has something to do with my windowsill conditions.
  10. Mine is in a quite windy location. Full sun (south) but behind a thin curtain in summer. I don't shade winter sun. Intermediate temps but low humidity. In higher humidity in summer it keeps 4-5 pitchers going though so I assume it would enjoy more humidity.
  11. Someone on another forum said the pitchers get more elongated as the plant get to the vining stage. I have no idea, any experts care to comment ? This is the plant 2 summers ago
  12. Just sharing my love for this species. Anyone else keeping this plant ? Please share your photos, I'd love to see the variations.
  13. Hahah ! So many details I hadn't even noticed like the pool game. "Hand sniffing" - lol! By the way Smilesii has gone into some flowering frenzy. I have already cut off 2 stalks and now it's making 2 more. I also have to keep it submerged in water all the time or it wilts immediately. Among my nepenthes it's very different, I wish I had a female Smilesii as well.
  14. Awesome, I think I've never seen this one before.
  15. Not really a summer bloom but my Aeonium finally flowered this year ! Here it is dormant once again now that summer has arrived: And this one is a spring bloom though I don't know the species - perhaps mammillaria ?: By the way my Orbea Variegata is making seeds again so if you want some let me know. No signs of seeds from Hirsuta or Stapelia yet. I think I will give away my orbea this year so this is probably the last time.
  16. Andrew, Veitchii is one of my favorite nepenthes but I think mine is a male as well Dave hehe, I feel the same way about Prometheus. At least the visuals are great as can be expected in a R Scott movie but that's about it. It's so difficult to watch those dorky "scientists" at work.
  17. Thanks much guys, I am happy it's a Smilesii indeed.
  18. Guys I think this may settle the debate. Today in the dying afternoon light I just saw this: Pitchers may be misleading because what you see here is actually sort of like the comeback of this pot. They suffered a transplanting shock early this spring and quickly came back from the roots. There's even a smaller plant in there that is just now making leaves again. So pitchers last summer were almost double this size and more elongated. Anyway the whole plant seems to be covered in small white hair. Funny how light changes so much during a single day and reveals different aspects.
  19. I tracked down my plant. I bought it in August 2012 and it's labeled as "N. Smilesii from Vietnam, Lang Bian Mountain, 1500 m - seedgrown". Milos is selling more in the sales section actually. Thanks for the help guys, I'll wait a bit before sending PMs, don't wanna disturb folk. Dave I'm sending you a signed copy of Prometheus! Manders I checked Suratensis last night, it really looks similar, I hope we find out.
  20. Hey everyone, My plant's ID has come into question as it's blooming for the first time. I bought it as a Smilesii but turns out it may be something else. Very thick roots, almost like a carrot. Vigorous in my dry intermediate conditions. Pitchers get bigger and more elongated by the end of summer. Manders asked me in another thread if the top of the leaves feels hairy. Honestly I don't feel much or any hair on the top surface but I can clearly feel hair beneath the leaves and on the sides.
  21. Very interesting, I've never seen this species before. I love the prickly stems, what a unique plant.
  22. Oh wow your garden is amazing! Just the way I like it, not too tidy and "sterile" (like those awful shaped hedges). That rocky slope is the highlight for me, I could sit there for hours every day...
  23. Richard mine does best when protected from direct light. However my climate is much hotter than yours and I protect almost all my plants from direct sun. Regia's outside in full sun but the sun is filtered through a thin curtain. It hasn't died back this year and 3 basals have come up. I'd take Fred's and gardenofeden's advice as I've seen their plants in photos and they are jaw-dropping.
  24. Oo yes, I kept and bred one of these. Actually it was a female already loaded with eggs so it was easy. They make copious amounts of web even in a large jar and they are vicious hunters. It's quite upsetting to watch it eat really even though it takes the prey back into the hole. I put them all back after the babies hatched (dozens of them!) and the mother was already dead at that stage.
  25. I am one of those people who experiment a lot with water. I have taken risks and learnt a few things but lost a few plants as well. Basically what I've confirmed is that sarracenia, drosera and dioneae are really sensitive about water. The harder it is the faster they show stress and start declining. I've been getting away with bottled water for them (which is about 30 tds) but I top water and flush a lot. Other side of the coin is: Would they grow better if I used pure water ? Probably... Nepenthes on the other hand are very hardy. I am using rested tap water (which is really hard, probably over 100 tds) for them but again it's important to note that I don't have any sensitive ultra highland species. I don't use live sphagnum either. So in my conditions and for the species I have (all windowsill grown) it works fine. To sum it up I would suggest that when you try a different water, give it at least 6 months of observation because unless the values are dramatic, it takes a while to see what is really happening. The pot media is also a good indicator.