James O'Neill

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Everything posted by James O'Neill

  1. I can't comment on the rate of growth of a plant with no companion plant as I have no controls, but my plants with a little sedge plant in the pot beside is growing very fast indeed with pitchers just over 5cm.
  2. But you didn't completely submerge yours I think the main idea is that roots have rotted - either through it being too wet - sopping wet - or compacted medium causing, like Mantrid said, anaerobic conditions.
  3. Not talking about your vfts Fred!
  4. As far as I can see, it was kept too wet and the submerging of the plant put the nail in its coffin. I keep my plants barely moist and they do very well. And if you look at wild vfts, they grow in just-damp sandy soil, not wet bog.
  5. Thanks everybody. I take a lot of pride in my Utricularia as you can see! The 3 stripe reniformis is likely to just be a strange individual flower, not a trait of the plant as a whole.
  6. My Utricularia have been doing well recently with the U. quelchii absolutely rocketing. I discovered today that in addition to its 3 flower scapes, it has 3 more coming up. It's done me proud so far. I spent some time today taking photos. Whole plant: Utricularia quelchii by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr Flowers: Utricularia quelchii by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr Utricularia quelchii by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr Utricularia quelchii by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr Utricularia quelchii by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr Utricularia quelchii by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr Utricularia quelchii by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr Utricularia quelchii by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr My U. reniformis has put on a super show for me too. Utricularia reniformis by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr With a flower with unusually 3 orange stripes. Utricularia reniformis by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr My U. praetermissa started putting up a flower scape but I snapped it off by accident Sarracenia flowers have only just started to open, with flava at the front: Sarracenia flava flower by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr Sarracenia flava flower by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr Sarracenia flava flower by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr The greenhouse has finally woken up. Sarracenias by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr Dionaea waking up by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr Sarracenias and Drosera by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr
  7. Hello, I am having an open day on Saturday the 10th August (contrary to what the Planta Carnivora says, it has been changed from the 3rd). I live in Northern Ireland where there aren't a lot of other growers so I'm hoping people will take it as an excuse to go for a holiday to our wee country. Weather permitting there may be a barbecue, and there will be trips for those interested out to nearby CP sites where a whole range of native (and non-native) CPs can be seen growing in the wild; one of the highlights is that it will be high season for flowering Utricularia australis in a nearby bog. If you are coming or have any questions, let me know in advance please. Email: [email protected] Address: 19 Roslyn Avenue Craigavon Co.Armagh BT63 5BG
  8. Can the Disa be grown in the sun and in the dept of water with the Sarras? I've always kept mine on the bench below but they are at risk a lot of the time as I let my pet rodents run around in the greenhouse and they like to chew things that are green. Despite that, I'm getting a flower on the x kewensis. My Cypripediums haven't done massively well this year, with only 1 flower whereas there were 6 last year!
  9. Ah, I have now just read: "The sticky, adhesive glands on leaves, sepals and other parts of the plant [cross leaved heath] prompted Charles Darwin to suggested that this species might be a protocarnivorous plant, but little if any research has been done on this." I'm interested to know more about it..
  10. That's it, I am very familiar with cross leaved heath but these plants never got big or woody or ever flowered, so they decieved me. Now what is Erica tetralix doing with those structures?
  11. The past few years I have had a small plant which has self seeded throughout my greenhouse. It grows in the local bogs and appears to have come with some sphagnum I harvested some years back. I never held a grudge against this plant as it never was too prolific and so I lived and let lived. Only this morning I have had a good look at this plant - what surprise I got! I noticed on the new spring growth stalked mucilage glands, which bear a remarable similarity to drosera tentacles. Each is no larger than, and usually smaller than, 1.5mm, and have a drop of sticky mucilage on the tip. Only the new spring growth has this, the older autumn growth only has sparse small white hairs, and thicker darker leaves. Could this possibly be a carnivorous trait, or perhaps more like something like the petunia or tomato, has sticky glands but does not digest victims? Another problem is that I do not know the identity of this plant, I have trawled through all the literature I have of Irish bog plants but cannot work out what it is. Whole plant: Mystery bog plant (overall) by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr Mystery bog plant (overall) by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr New growth macros: Mystery bog plant (macro) by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr Mystery bog plant (macro) by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr Mystery bog plant (macro silhouette) by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr Photos taken under the microscope of the new growth leaves and glands: Mystery bog plant (micro photograph of stalked glands on leaf tip) by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr Mystery bog plant (micro photograph of stalked gland) by JimbO'Neill, on Flickr I'd love to know people's thoughts on this matter.
  12. It's like an embryo dividing into many cells!
  13. Certainly leucophylla x rubra is most likely option.
  14. Yes, that is a lovely little dew. What part of the world is it from?
  15. Out of interest, do you have any pictures of this plant?
  16. There is a site in Co. Galway or Clare I think, of Ireland where Darlingtonia have naturalised. I think I heard there was flava there too, and certainly purpurea.
  17. Got mine from Mike couple of weeks ago, been looking for that F18 for ages!
  18. Compact cameras like yours tend to have pretty good macro features. However, for best results, like in JP's thread, an SLR with a good macro lens is needed, which allows for super sharp super close up pictures. I'm not all that familiar with getting lenses for compacts.
  19. Thankyou, I've been considering getting a nikon and sigma macro lens, these photos have made up my mind.
  20. These are incredibly beautiful macros, I'm interested to know what camera and lens you have?