PofW_Feathers

Full Members
  • Content Count

    135
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    3

Everything posted by PofW_Feathers

  1. Dear Andreas-san & Dear Fernando-san, Konnichiwa! WOW..... JUST.......WOW Kind regards from the Far East
  2. Dear Drosera5150-san, I am surprised that you are still claiming I use B-9 to grow my plants. What scientific evidence do you have to accuse me of using B-9? I am looking forward to seeing the Byblis plants that are treated with B-9 by German cp growers. To my knowledge B-9 causes the promotion of branching, an increase in flower number and dwarfing. However I believe their Byblis plants will not look like the Byblis plants in my photos because I never use B-9 or any growth control chemicals/hormones. The only chemical I use is GA3 for germination. Please see: http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=32785 Henry-san has wondered why his plants do not branch. I do not know his cultivation method but it looks like his soil is hard and heavy. His cultivation skill will improve as his skill levels grow with time. Note the short internodes of his plant. I believe he does not use B-9 or similar chemicals to achieve this. You wrote "In my opinion, the supposed "second location" is simply someone's flower-bed." I think your opinion is unacceptable for you to suggest Mr.Allen Lowrie of staging the photograph of B. rorida growing with B. guehoi in someone’s flower bed. There is not one thread of evidence of staging in the photo(s) to back-up your opinion. I have seen the whole sequence of photos Allen-san took from photo 6915 to 6926 which includes the habitat photo 6924 which you claim is simply provided as a placebo and isn’t even relevant to photo 6917. DSC06915 B. guehoi 2nd location E of Broome © Allen Lowrie 2009 DSC06917 B. rorida left, Calandrinia centre & B. guehoi right 2nd location E of Broome © Allen Lowrie 2009 DSC06920 B. guehoi 2nd location E of Broome © Allen Lowrie 2009 DSC06921 B. rorida that grows with B. guehoi 2nd location E of Broome © Allen Lowrie 2009 DSC06923 B. guehoi 2nd location E of Broome © Allen Lowrie 2009 DSC06924 Boab tree and ant-mound at location of B. guehoi 2nd location E of Broome © Allen Lowrie 2009 DSC06925 D. broomensis © Allen Lowrie 2009 DSC06926 D. broomensis © Allen Lowrie 2009 I believe that the Byblis plants treated with B-9 by German cp growers will not look like the Byblis plants in my photos. German cp growers may obtain some good results after they use B-9. However, I believe they will soon realize that B-9 is a technology that may not translate into an improvement of their cultivation skills. I guess many cp growers including me, do not strive for such techniques. Kind regards from the Far East photo links changed (same photos): 2014/11/29
  3. Dear henry-san, Konnichiwa! I think your plants are Byblis guehoi. Kind regards from the Far East
  4. Dear Marcel-san, Konnichiwa! Domo Arigatou Gozaimasu! (=Thank you very much!) Here are the tropical Byblis species photos used for this experiment. Photo 24: Photo 25: Kind regards from the Far East photo links changed (same photos): 2014/11/29
  5. Dear JohnnyBlaze-san, Konnichiwa! I carried out another experiment that was suggested by Mr. Allen Lowrie. On May 19,2009; I put three Byblis plants (without roots) in a glass jar. I then added 80ml of water to the jar. I shook the bottle hard. I then sprayed the diluted Byblis mucus onto the grasshopper. 12 hours later the grasshopper's movements had slowed a little. The viscosity of diluted Byblis mucus is thick and it did not spray easily onto the grasshopper. On May 21,2009; In the morning, I put two Byblis plants (without roots) in the glass jar. I added 10ml of water to the jar. I put the diluted Byblis mucus solution in an injection syringe (without needle). I then spread the diluted Byblis mucus onto the grasshopper's chest. One hour 30 minutes later the Grasshopper's movements were very much slowed. Although the grasshopper did not comatose it was still a good enough result! In the night, I put three Byblis plants in a glass jar. I added 15ml water to the jar. I shook the bottle hard. I spread the diluted Byblis mucus solution onto another grasshopper's chest using a syringe. Please see the photo 23: The grasshopper movements slowed very much 1 hour later. 1 hour and 25 minutes later the grasshopper died. Photo 21: Photo 22: Photo 23 I will contribute tropical Byblis species photo used for this experiment later. Kind regards from the Far East photo links changed (same photos): 2014/11/29
  6. Konnichiwa! After my previous report I did an additional “grasshopper as prey” experiment. This time I placed another grasshopper onto the Byblis foliage. It took 1 hour and 30 minutes until I could see that the grasshopper's movements had been slowed to the point that it was almost comatose. This showed positively that the sleepiness effect on the grasshopper was caused by its contact with the Byblis mucus. The first grasshopper has recovered considerably. The grasshopper seems not to have been suffocated by the closing of its air-breathing pores by Byblis mucus as I did not wash its air-breathing pores. My wife and I have simply been giving water to this grasshopper to drink for several days. As can be seen in photo 19, the grasshopper seems to have resumed its health. Please note the brown spot on the grasshopper's right side. This mark shows that this grasshopper is the same grasshopper in photo18. Byblis mucus appears to be harmless to frogs. Please see the photo 20, I often see this view. The frogs do not die. Photo 19: The radio controlled watch showed Japan standard time. Photo 20: I welcome any other opinions. Kind regards from the Far East photo links changed (same photos): 2014/11/29
  7. Subject: Byblis glandular mucus Sub title: could it contain a sleeping drug come anesthetizing agent; nerve immobilizing agent and/or an insecticide? Konnichiwa! I have been producing Byblis for the past ten years. In summer, to avoid the heat of the day, I often work at night under lights. My greenhouses are surrounded by rice fields. The harmful insect pest of the rice plant, Nephotettix cincticeps as well as many other insects are drawn to the lights in my Byblis greenhouse, where many of the insects of varying sizes are caught on the Byblis foliage. Some insects however, because of their larger size do manage to escape from the glands on the Byblis foliage and drop to the soil in the pots below. I have often observed that the movements of these larger insect escapees are very slow and by the morning are dead. At first I thought their death had occurred due to suffocation by their air-breathing pores being clogged with Byblis gland mucus. After observing many larger insect escapees with slowed movements followed by death, I have come to the conclusion that suffocation by mucus maybe wrong. Last summer, I witnessed a Polistes wasp from the time it was first caught on Byblis foliage, to its escape and eventual death. The Polistes wasp, also known as a paper wasp, is far too large for Byblis to capture and process effectively as prey. Within ten minutes of capture, I noticed that the wasp was barely moving. I removed the wasp from the Byblis foliage and on closer observation it appeared that its air-breathing pores had not been blocked with Byblis gland mucus. Even though the wasp was still alive it was hardly moving, it appeared almost comatose. In the morning I found the insect had died. One morning just recently I found a grasshopper caught on a Byblis plant (see photo 18: the grasshopper's forearms did not move at the time, it looked like it was almost dead). I took the photo on May 12,2009. The size of the grasshopper was far too large for Byblis to use as prey. I removed the grasshopper from the Byblis and noticed once again that it was hardly moving but was not dead. I could also see the grasshopper had no Byblis mucus clogging its air-breathing pores. In the evening, each time I touched the grasshopper it went into convulsions. The following morning the grasshopper drank some water that my wife had given to it but it was still rather frail and barely moving. Byblis species are not immune from insect attack. I have seen a few types of caterpillar species eating Byblis. One morning, I noticed that some herbivorous insect had eaten half of an entire Byblis plant during the night. I do not know what the insect was or in what condition its health was after it had eaten this Byblis plant. From these observations two questions have occurred to me. 1:Does the biochemical viscid glandular secretion mucus of Byblis and other carnivorous plants bearing dewy glands not only contain a digestive enzyme but also a sleeping drug come anesthetic, nerve destroying agent and/or insecticide as well that effects all flying insects? 2: Would it be possible to develop an insecticide, that is harmless to both man and the environment, based on the insect immobilizing chemical components contained within this viscid glandular secretion mucus? Kind regards from the Far East P.S. I will post a few photos. Please wait to reply to this message till then. Photo 18: photo link changed (same photo): 2014/11/29
  8. Konnichiwa! Mr. Allen Lowrie & Dr. John G. Conran described Byblis guehoi mega multi-branching habit in the wild in their paper. http://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets...el121023Low.pdf I have been growing Byblis guehoi since 2006. Byblis guehoi plants always branch in my cultivation. Check out my Byblis guehoi producing new additional growing points from the basal areas of the main stem in photos 15,16,17 & 18. This branching habit is normal for this species. Photo 15 & 16:This particular Byblis guehoi plant was sown in plug tray on February 25, 2009. The plant was transplanted to its larger pot on April 12, 2009. Photo 17 & 18:This Byblis guehoi plant was sown in plug tray on February 20, 2009. The plant was transplanted to its larger pot on April 8, 2009. Photo 19: Note the branching habit of another tropical Byblis species in my cultivation. The plant was sown in plug tray on February 20, 2009 and transplanted to its larger pot on April 8, 2009. The other day Mr. Allen Lowrie sent me a few photos of Byblis guehoi growing at a second location with Byblis rorida in the wild east of Broome. Please see photos 20, 21 & 22. I was very surprised again because of its mega multi-branching foliage habit in the wild. Byblis guehoi is an absolutely phenomenal species!!! About Photo 20, 21 & 22, The photos are offered by Mr. Allen Lowrie's goodwill. The copyright of the photos belongs to Mr. Allen Lowrie. Photo 15: Byblis guehoi Photo 16: Byblis guehoi; same plant as photo 15 Photo 17: Byblis guehoi Photo 18: Byblis guehoi; same plant as photo 17 Photo 19: another tropical Byblis species Photo 20: DSC06923 B. guehoi 2nd location E of Broome c Allen Lowrie 2009 Photo 21: DSC06917 B. rorida left, Calandrinia centre & B. guehoi right 2nd location E of Broome c Allen Lowrie 2009 Photo 22: DSC06924 Boab tree and ant-mound at location of B. guehoi 2nd location E of Broome c Allen Lowrie 2009 References: How to germinate http://icps.proboards105.com/index.cgi?boa...amp;thread=1866 How to grow http://icps.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=...amp;thread=2348 http://icps.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=...2348&page=2 http://icps.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=byblis Kind regards from the Far East photo links changed (same photos): 2014/11/29
  9. Konnichiwa Greg-san, Thank you very much for sharing your beautiful images. I like Byblis, too! What time did you sow the seeds and when were your images taken? Here are the photos of my plants for this year. They were sown on February 20, 2009. They were transplanted to the pots on April 8, 2009. I took the photos on April 14, 2009. Photo 11: Byblis guehoi The glands of Byblis guehoi are very dense, please see the photos 1 &2 in http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=30789. Photo 12: This is a potential Byblis cultivar which I have been making. This clone is quite different to the clone in photo 6 in http://icps.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=...amp;thread=2348. Photo 13: Note the branching. Photo 14: Take a look at the color of the petal. I am expecting the flowers to be this same color. My best guess is that the uniformity of this clone may still prove to be low. Hopefully, I will be able to post a few photos of this clone. May this thread bring all tropical Byblis growers good fortune. Kind regards from the Far East
  10. Konnichiwa! I have just edited post#4. We will have the most suitable season for sowing tropical Byblis over the next few months in the northern hemisphere. I have a catalogue and updated list from Mr. Allen Lowrie. He is still distributing Byblis guehoi seed. He has many interesting Byblis variations on both his catalogue and updated list. See Byblis lists below. For example, Byblis species "Biota 367 plants match Bynoe's TYPE material coastal area a little way south of Kuri Bay, Kimberley". I was able to grow it for the first time last year. Unfortunately, I forgot to take a picture of the mature plants. However, I can describe this species: it is "semi-giant robust bushy plant with beautiful large pinkish mauve and pink striped flowers, I believe you would be very pleased with this Byblis and other variations of Byblis from Allen's seed lists. photo07: Byblis species "Biota 367 plants match Bynoe's TYPE material coastal area a little way south of Kuri Bay, Kimberley" photo08: B.species ‘Pilbara‘ Western Australia photo09: B.species ‘Pilbara‘ Western Australia photo10: B.species “flower purple both sides” Theda Station, Kimberley (AL & MDB 25-2-2005) If you would like to grow Byblis species robust Giant clones from Pago region. I recommend: B.filifolia ”outer flower surface whitish” Honeymoon Beach, Kimberley B.filifolia “giant plants to 50cm tall” Pago, Kimberley Byblis seed in Allen's up-dated list B.aquatica “ new location record (Qld) for the species, plants up to 90 cm long, flowers purple and overall much more robust than type form from the Northern Territory” Sanamere Lagoon, Cape York Peninsula, far north Queensland, Australia B.filifolia [F02: via Japan] ”outer flower surface whitish” Honeymoon Beach, Kimberley B.filifolia [F15: via Japan] “giant plants to 50cm tall” Pago, Kimberley B.filifolia [F54: via Japan] “plants match Bynoe’s TYPE material” coastal area (not an island) a little way south of Kuri Bay, Kimberley (Biota 367). Clone 01 x with mixed pollen of Clone 01, Clone 02, Clone 03 & Clone 04 B.filifolia [F54: via Japan] “plants match Bynoe’s TYPE material” coastal area (not an island) a little way south of Kuri Bay, Kimberley (Biota 367). Clone 02 x with mixed pollen of Clone 01, Clone 02, Clone 03 & Clone 04 B.filifolia [F54: via Japan] “plants match Bynoe’s TYPE material” coastal area (not an island) a little way south of Kuri Bay, Kimberley (Biota 367). Clone 03 x with mixed pollen of Clone 01, Clone 02, Clone 03 & Clone 04 B.gigantea “flowers colours in various shades of mauve to purple as well as snow-white flowered clones ” mixed seed from scattered clones at site #2, area A, Canning River East, E of Perth, Western Australia B.lamellata “plants to 30-50 cm tall, flowers dark pink to purple. The most know southern location for this species” Cataby, W.A. B.liniflora “plants to 5 cm tall, flowers mauve, outer surface white” West Alligator River, Kimberley B.species [uN11: via Japan] “flower purple both sides” Theda Station, Kimberley (AL & MDB 25-2-2005). Clone 01 x Clone 02 B.species [uN11: via Japan] “flower purple both sides” Theda Station, Kimberley (AL & MDB 25-2-2005). Clone 02 x Clone 01 B.species ‘Pilbara‘ “first crop of clone 01 x clone 02” Pilbara, Western Australia B.species ‘Pilbara‘ “second crop of clone 01 x clone 02” Pilbara, Western Australia Byblis seed in Allen's 2008-2009 catalogue B.aquatica “leaves about 2-3 cm long, plants to 15-30cm tall” East Charlotte River, N.T. B.aquatica “leaves about 2-3 cm long, plants to 15-30cm tall” E of Girraween Lagoon, N.T. B.aquatica “maroon plants to 15 cm tall, with small purple flowers” West Alligator River, N.T. B.aquatica “maroon plants to 15 cm tall, with small purple flowers” Noonamah, N.T. B.aquatica “leaves about 2-3 cm long, plants to 15-30cm tall” Darwin River, N.T. B.aquatica “large robust form” Haycock Reach, N.T. B.filifolia “loc. 37 Kimberley x loc. 06 Northern Territory, an F1 hybrid. Descending leaves act like tripod legs and support the plant, flowers mauve. B.filifolia “small plants to 15 cm tall similar to the type form, flowers purple violet, outer surface pale lemon yellow with longitudinal red wine stains on one margin” Fish farm E of Kununurra, Kimberley, Western Australia B.filifolia “Plants > 25 cm tall, flowers mauve, 18 mm Ø, outer surface pale lemon yellow,” Beagle Bay, Dampier Peninsula, Kimberley, Western Australia B.filifolia “robust plants > 25 cm tall, flowers fading to white 2.5 cm Ø, outer surface white, petal tips very serrate” near junction of Kalumburu-Gibb River-Derby & Gibb River-Wyndham Rds, Kimberley, Western Australia B.filifolia “robust plants > 25 cm tall, flowers pink 3 cm Ø, outer surface white, petal tips very serrate” near junction of Kalumburu-Gibb River-Derby & Gibb River-Wyndham Rds, Kimberley, Western Australia B.filifolia “robust plants > 25 cm tall, flowers violet- mauve 2.5 cm Ø, outer surface white, petal tips very serrate” near junction of Kalumburu-Gibb River-Derby & Gibb River-Wyndham Rds, Kimberley, Western Australia B.filifolia “robust plants > 25 cm tall, flowers mixed colours of white, pale pink, pink & very dark pink >3 cm Ø, outer surface white, petal tips very serrate” near junction of Kalumburu-Gibb River-Derby & Gibb River-Wyndham Rds, Kimberley, Western Australia B.filifolia “robust plants > 25 cm tall, flowers mixed colours of pale pink, pink & violet- mauve >3 cm Ø, outer surface white, petal tips very serrate” Gibb River-Wyndham Rd, just after Gregorys Jump-up, Kimberley, Western Australia B.filifolia “Robust plants > 25 cm tall, flowers mauve, outer surface pale lemon yellow with longitudinal red wine stains on one margin” Gibb River-Wyndham Rd, just after Gregorys Jump-up, Kimberley, Western Australia B.filifolia “plants to 45 cm tall, flowers mauve, outer surface yellow with red wine stained margins” north of Kingston Rest, Kimberley, Western Australia B.filifolia “plants to 45 cm tall, flowers mauve, outer surface yellow with red wine stained margins” Kingston Rest, Kimberley, Western Australia B.filifolia “plant to 50 cm tall, flowers mauve, outer surface yellow” Cave Spring, Kimberley B.filifolia “plants to 55 cm tall, flowers mauve, outer surface yellow with red wine stained margins” Weaber Plains, Kimberley, Western Australia B.filifolia “plants to 55 cm tall, flowers mauve, outer surface yellow with red wine stained margins” east of Kununurra, Kimberley, Western Australia B.filifolia “ plants > 60 cm tall, very floriferous, flowers mauve outer surface lemon yellow with broad red wine stains on the petal margins” N of Kingston Rest, Kimberley, W.A. B.filifolia “robust plants mostly 50-60 cm tall, many > 120 cm tall, flowers variable in colour from palest pink to dark pink, mauve or purple violet, outer surface pale lemon yellow with longitudinal red wine stains on one margin” seepage area on road to Lake Argyle, Kimberley, Western Australia B.filifolia “plants to 35 cm tall, flowers mauve with pale lemon on back” Boulk area south of Lombadina on Dampier Peninsular, Kimberley, W.A. B.filifolia “branching plant, flowers mauve, outer surface yellow with maroon stripes” Honeymoon Beach, Kimberley, W.A. B.filifolia “plants 60 cm tall, flowers mauve, outer yellow with purple radiating lines” Bungarun, Derby, Kimberley B.filifolia “plants 25-30 cm tall, 4-6 branched in the upper half” Mount Bomford, Drysdale River Station, Kimberley B.filifolia “plants 60 cm tall, flowers mauve, outer yellow with thick maroon purple radiating marks and margins” SE of Kununurra, Kimberley B.filifolia “plants 30 cm tall, flowers mauve, outer white” Gibb Range, Kimberley B.filifolia “mauve flower outer surface white’ Theda, Kimberley B.filifolia “Plant to 30 cm tall, flowers mauve, outer surface lemon-yellow with purple margins” Lake Argyle, Kimberley B.filifolia “Plant to 45 cm tall, flowers mauve, outer surface yellow ” west of Kununurra, Kimberley B.filifolia “Plant to 45 cm tall, flowers mauve, outer surface yellow” north of Taylor’s Lagoon, Kimberley B.filifolia “Plant to 50 cm tall, flowers mauve, outer surface lemon-yellow with purple margins” south east of Kununurra, Kimberley B.filifolia “Plant multi-headed, flowers mauve, outer surface lemon-yellow with purple margins” Cave Spring, Kimberley B.filifolia “mauve flower, petal tips serrate, outer surface yellow” north of Taylor’s Lagoon, Kimberley B.filifolia Gibb River, Kimberley B.filifolia “giant plants to 50 cm tall” Pago, Kimberley B.filifolia “mauve, outer surface lemon-yellow” west of Kununurra, Kimberley B.filifolia “overall finer plant to 15 cm, very floriferous” Litchfield, N.T. B.gigantea “Bibbulmun Track” south east of Perth, W.A. excellent robust form B.gigantea “ robust population of mixed flower colours from pale mauve to dark purple” Perth Airport, W.A. B.gigantea “robust plants with large flowers of various shades of mauve-purple” now extinct at this location due to a commercial building development, Canning Vale, W.A. B.guehoi (Lowrie & Conran) “multi-headed plants, mauve flower” Kimberley, Western Australia B.guehoi “Ab01 x Ab02” from a first raising of 5 clones (labelled Ab01, Ab02, Ab03, Ab04, Ab05) type location Bobbys Creek, Kimberley B.guehoi “Ab02 x Ab01” from a first raising of 5 clones (labelled Ab01, Ab02, Ab03, Ab04, Ab05) type location Bobbys Creek, Kimberley B.lamellata “plants to 30-50 cm tall, flower colours between clones a variable range in shades of dark pink to purple in this colony” location #3, Arrowsmith River, W.A. B.lamellata “plants to 20-45 cm tall, flower colours variable in all shades of pink” S of Eneabba, W.A. B.lamellata Arrowsmith River, W.A. B.liniflora “robust fine plants > 18 cm tall, flowers mauve >1.5 cm Ø, outer surface white” permanent seepage spring on Gibb River Station, Kimberley, Western Australia B.liniflora “robust fine plants > 20 cm tall, flowers mauve >1.5 cm Ø, outer surface white” Phillips Range, Kimberley, Western Australia B.liniflora “plants to 5 cm tall, flowers mauve, outer surface white” Theda Station, Kimberley B.liniflora Palmerston, Northern Territory, Australia B.liniflora “An excellent new discovery, robust erect plants to 15 cm tall, sprouting new leafy growth freely from many leaf axils when apical tip of mature plant is removed, flowers 15 mm Ø, pale mauve, yellow anthers shorter than filaments” Kingston Rest, Kimberley B.rorida “ growing with a new Byblis species (in publication)” 80 km E of Broome B.rorida “robust plants to 30 cm tall, very floriferous” Lake Campion, Kimberley Reference: How to germinate http://icps.proboards105.com/index.cgi?boa...amp;thread=1866 How to grow etc http://icps.proboards105.com/index.cgi?boa...amp;thread=2348 http://icps.proboards105.com/index.cgi?boa...amp;thread=2389 Kind regards from the Far East photo links changed (same photos): 2014/11/29
  11. nicklott-san, adams-san, Pyro-san, & All who love Byblis, Konnichiwa! Byblis guehoi (pronounced gay-ho-eye) (pronounced and rhymes with Hay) This species is already in culture. photo 1:Byblis guehoi photo 2:Byblis guehoi photo 3:Byblis guehoi photo 4:Byblis guehoi photo 5:right Byblis guehoi photo 6:left Byblis species giant clone from Pago region, right Byblis guehoi There was one plant in each pot. For branching, there is no need for any pinching, clipping, chemicals in my cultivation. Kind regards from the Far East photo links changed (same photos): 2014/11/29