PofW_Feathers

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Everything posted by PofW_Feathers

  1. Dear Fernando-san, Konnichiwa! AMAZING!!! from the Far East
  2. Dear Andreas Eils-san, Konnichiwa! This species(triggerplant003) is Stylidium crossocephalum. I always enjoy cultivating triggerplants from Mr. Allen Lowrie. I am a horticulturist not a taxonomist. So please ask Mr. Allen Lowrie any species questions. There are many undescribed species in this genus. Kind regards from the Far East
  3. Dear Jimscott-san, Konnichiwa! This one is one of my favourites. Kind regards from the Far East
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  10. Dear Alexander-san, Konnichiwa! Thank you very much for your beautiful photos!!! I can see Mt. Nyoho from my house. It takes 1.5-2 hours by car from my house. Both Pinguicula ramosa(Please see my personal photo, not avator) and Pinguicula macroseras grow in the mountain. Mt. Nyoho that is familiar to me is in Tochigi Prefecture, not Akita-Pref.. 36°48'45.11"N 139°32'17.11"E. There are a lot of mountains that have same name in Japan. So I'm not sure. Another Mt. Nyoho is in Wakayama-Pref.. It is written in another Kanji(Chinese characters). Mt. Nyoho might exist also in Akita Prefecture???? Or Akita means you obtained it from Mr. Akita? Kind regards from the far east p.s. I do not live in Tochigi Prefecture.
  11. Dear maurizio-san, Konnichiwa! BEAUTIFUL!!!
  12. Title: Byblis aff. filifolia F44 “entire wine stained backs form” Konnichiwa! In 2007, Mr. Allen Lowrie presented me with the seeds of F44. F44: B. aff. filifolia "plants to 55cm tall, flowers mauve, outer surface yellow with red wine stained margins" Weaber Plains, Kimberley, Western Australia. (The F is my code letter abbreviation and the number represents the clone type in Byblis filifolia complex) All clones were very beautiful, and most attractive. One clone in particular was very interesting. Please see the photo1: Almost all parts of the abaxial (back) surface of this clone is red wine coloured. With my breeding program I wanted to fix this character. In 2010, I encountered an intense inbreeding depression. Unwisely, I had not been maintaining the progeny clones of the normal F44. I therefore had no clones of normal F44 so that I could recover this unique abaxial coloured F44 from its inbreeding depression. Fortunately, Mr. Allen Lowrie had extra seeds of F44 and he kindly sent me replacement seeds of F44 again! I can now continue this breeding line program. photo 1: close up of the abaxial (back) surface of B. aff. filifolia F44 “entire wine stained backs form” photo 2: & 3: B. aff. filifolia F44 “entire wine stained backs form” Unfortunately I forgot to photograph all clones of B. aff. filifolia F44 when they were full-bloomed plants. Both the normal clones and the unique clone of B. aff. filifolia F44 “entire wine stained backs form” were all very floriferous to the point of hiding all their foliage. Hopefully, I will be able to post a few full-bloomed normal clones of F44 in the next year so I can share them with you all. Additionally I am hopeful I can establish the B. aff. filifolia F44 “entire wine stained backs form” and I will be able to post a few photos of an established line of this unique clone in several years time. I feel that the F44 abaxial surface colour of yellow with red wine stained margins is a qualitative character. I consider that the area that the red wine stain occupies is a quantitative character. I sense this quantitative character is managed by a polygene or polygenes. I think it is possible that I can achieve this “entire wine stained backs” feature by selectively breeding and accumulating the polygene(s) that relate to this feature. However, it also means that I have to struggle with the inbreeding depression in F44 which I have already identified at this time. I wrote about the polygene in Byblis: reply#3 http://icps.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=...amp;thread=4395 or post#6 http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=39186 Kind regards photo1: close up of the abaxial (back) surface of B. aff. filifolia F44 “entire wine stained backs form” photo2: B. aff. filifolia F44 “entire wine stained backs form” photo3: B. aff. filifolia F44 “entire wine stained backs form” photo links changed (same photos): 2014/11/29
  13. Konnichiwa! I do hope the authors. K. Fukushima; K. Imamura; K. Nagano; and Y. Hoshi of the paper “Contrasting patterns of 5S and 45A evolutions…” will add some more Byblis species to their research once they have been formally described by Mr. Allen Lowrie and his colleague Dr John Conran. For example, all the new Byblis species as well as the potential type form of Byblis filifolia from the Biota project that were presented by Mr. Allen Lowrie in his Byblis presentation at the International Carnivorous Plant Society conference in Leiden, The Netherlands in Aug. 2010. Kind regards
  14. Title: Byblis aff. filifolia ‘Carson River blackish-maroon zigzag stem’ In 1999, I obtained F03: Byblis aff. filifolia "outer flower surface lemon" Carson River, Kimberley from Mr. Allen Lowrie. (The F is my code letter abbreviation and the number represents the clone type in Byblis filifolia complex) I remember I was enchanted with F03 when I first grew it. However, at the time I had other specific breeding purposes and F03 was not suitable then for my breeding program. In 1999, I only produced seeds with F03 and preserved them in the refrigerator at the end of their growth cycle in 1999. Recently, when I came across the stored seed of Byblis F03 I could not recall in my memory exactly what F03 looked like and because I did not take any photos of F03 in 1999 I had nothing to refresh my mind. In the spring of 2010, I sowed the seeds of F03. Refrigeration storage insured the viability of the seed of F03 and they all germinated well once sown. After the plants matured I noticed the reason why F03 had enchanted me back in 1999. In my cultivation, the stem below the shoot apex always turns a blackish-maroon colour with the connecting parts of the leaf down both sides of the stem remaining a beautiful green. Please see photo 1. The connection of the green leaf bases combined with the erect blackish-maroon of the stem emphasizes the slightly zigzag nature of the plant’s erect stem. Please see the photo 2. The flower character of F03: Byblis aff. filifolia is not unusual. The adaxial (front) surface is mauve. The abaxial (back) surface is a beautiful lemon yellow with mauve stain. Please see photo 3. Photo 1: close up of F03: Byblis aff. filifolia stem. Photo 2: The slightly zigzag stem of F03: Byblis aff. filifolia. Photo 3: the adaxial (front) surface and the abaxial (back) surface of F03: Byblis aff. filifolia in comparison with another Byblis aff. filifolia variation CS08: Byblis aff. filifolia from Gibb River Road, Kimberley. Kind regards photo 1: close up of F03: Byblis aff. filifolia stem. photo 2: The slightly zigzag stem of F03: Byblis aff. filifolia. photo 3: the adaxial (front) surface and the abaxial (back) surface of F03: Byblis aff. filifolia in comparison with another Byblis aff. filifolia variation CS08: Byblis aff. filifolia from Gibb River Road, Kimberley. photo links changed (same photos): 2014/11/29
  15. Title: Polygenic inheritance Konnichiwa! I have often wondered if the unique flower character of DT14 was managed by polygenes. Now that I have gathered addition data on this line of inquiry I now sense that this character maybe managed by polygenes. I think the flower size and the flower shape of Byblis are also possibly managed by polygenes. In my breeding program I have found it extremely difficult to fix the flower size of Byblis. I believe the reason for this is also controlled by polygenes. I have become aware that the following characters of: lighter and darker colour shades of the flowers; the flower shape; and flower size appear to be managed by polygenes. In my breeding trials I have seen these characters exhibiting random traits not systematic traits. Kind regards
  16. Dear Fernando-san, Dear jimscott-san, Konnichiwa! Thank you very much! Dear Greg-san, Konnichiwa! Please see reply #13: http://icps.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=...2348&page=1 and reply #17: http://icps.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=...2348&page=2 I grow all my tropical Byblis under the same condition. You already know JohnnyBlaze-san's success. http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=38315 He said that he had not used any fertilizer. I received an update photo from him on October 6. His plant (which he called purple petal) had exploded into flower! It was an absolutely fantastic plant! You already saw: http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=38180 JohnnyBlaze-san's said “ ...and expanded clay...” I always use 'Kanumatsuchi' expanded clay, it is an orange-yellow ocher clay which you have already seen. Post#2 http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=31457 The kanumatsuchi expanded clay is acid expanded volcanic gravel. JohnnyBlaze-san has used some kind of expanded clay that he was able to obtain in Switzerland. I have no other information and I do not know whether this product can be obtained in the U.K. I use Canadian peat. JohnnyBlaze-san uses European peat. I put a small amount of charcoal (made from rice seed husk) in the bottom in the pot. I do not know what he uses for the alternative. JohnnyBlaze-san has achieved excellent plants with his soil mix by using materials that he was able to obtain in Europe. He also reported. in the same thread post #3…"Pots 15cm in diameter". in the same thread post #5… "mini-Sauna". I also recommend to give your plants "FULL SUNLIGHT". JohnnyBlaze-san has offered a complete European specification soil recipe in the near future. So please wait until he posts his methods suitable for European growing conditions. Kind regards
  17. Dear Fernando-san, It is not correct. And To compare normal F08 clones with the F08 clones that the chromosome numbers were doubled with colchicine. The clones were smaller than normal clones. Please see: http://icps.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=...&thread=524 F08:"Giant plant" Dominic Creak, Kimberley (F number is my code number abbreviation for the Byblis filifolia complex.) Kind regards
  18. Title: Byblis rorida 'non bristle form' DT14 Konnchiwa! CS14 and CS15 are unusual Byblis rorida forms that were found by my friend along the Gibb River Road, Kimberley, Western Australia. Both forms have short glands only and no long bristle-like glands on its sepals as found on typical Byblis rorida type forms. I have labeled both as CS14: Byblis rorida and CS15: Byblis rorida. I found DT14 among many progeny clones of CS14 which I have labeled DT14 "Byblis rorida ‘non-bristle, unique flowered form' has short glands only and no long bristle-like glands on its sepals as found on typical Byblis rorida type forms. It also has a unique flower character of additional petal appendages on the adaxial (front) surface of the petals. (The CS and DT letters and numbers are my abbreviation codes for the different clones I am working with.) I was hopeful that the unique flower character of DT14 would follow the Mendelism inheritance pathway and keep its unique flower character. This year it appears a few clones raised from my work with DT14, have gone against the Mendelism genetic laws of inheritance and lost their unique flower character. I'm not sure whether or not this unique flower character in DT14 will follow Mendel’s inheritance laws in the future and always produce clones that have this unique flower character. I’m guessing that the gene for the unique flower character of “additional petal appendages on the adaxial (front) surface of the petals” of DT14 already existed in the wild. In the process of the selection breeding. I thought the unique flower character of DT14 was a recessive gene. I do not think (but I am not 100% sure) that it is a superior gene. My prediction of all of this year's clones having the unique flower character was not quite correct. Unfortunately, a couple of clones of DT14 produced normal flowers. Also the unique flower character arrangement on the petal surfaces was a bit variable. Please see attached photo taken this year of this petal variation. In conclusion I can report that the majority of DT14 clones this year have produced the unique flower character. This unique flower character of DT14 character seems to be still in the process of the mutation. Please see the photo 4, the anthers of left flower have changed into the small petals. DT14, CS14 and CS15 all have the typical character unique to Byblis rorida of beautiful dew like sessile glands covering the shoot apex. Please see photo 6: There are always many long stalked (bristle like) glands on the sepals of normal variations of Byblis rorida. Please see the photo 5: There are shorter stalked glands only on the sepals of DT14 non bristle-unique flower form. Please see the photo 7: The abaxial (back) petal surface striped character of DT14 unique flower form is not unusual, but I like it very much! photo 1: Byblis rorida 'non bristle, unique flowered form' DT14 photo 2: Byblis rorida 'non bristle form' CS14 photo 3: Byblis rorida 'non bristle form' CS15 photo 4: two types of DT14's flower photo 5: close up of DT14's sepals photo 6: close up of normal Byblis rorida's sepals photo 7: the adaxial (front) surface and the abaxial (back) surface of DT14 flowers Kind regards photo 1: Byblis rorida 'non bristle, unique flowered form' DT14 photo 2: Byblis rorida 'non bristle form' CS14 photo 3: Byblis rorida 'non bristle form' CS15 photo 4: two types of DT14's flower photo 5: close up of DT14's sepals photo 6: close up of normal Byblis rorida's sepals photo 7: the adaxial surface and the abaxial surface of DT14 flowers photo links changed (same photos): 2014/11/29
  19. Title: Byblis aff. filifolia Pago giant Konnichiwa! In 1999, I obtained seed of many tropical Byblis species from Mr. Allen Lowrie. I was very impressed by all these tropical Byblis species. One of them was Byblis aff. filifolia Pago giant. This was the first species I selected to start my Byblis breeding program with. This species was discussed by Mr. Allen Lowrie in his Byblis presentation at the international conference in Leiden, The Netherlands in Aug. 2010. In 1999, I grew 3 variations of Byblis aff. filifolia Pago giant. F02:"outer flower surface whitish" Honeymoon Beach, Kimberley F08:"Giant plant" Dominic Creak, Kimberley F15:"giant plants to 50cm tall" Pago, Kimberley (F number is my code number abbreviation for the Byblis filifolia complex.) You can see mature plants of F02 and F15. Photo3 in the reply#1: http://icps.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=...amp;thread=2348 You can see the mature plants of F08. photo15 in the reply#6: http://icps.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=...&thread=524 and photo17 in the same thread. The size of the pinkish mauve flower and the deep pinkish mauve flower were almost the same as the very first plants I raised from Mr. Allen Lowrie's seeds. I took photo17 in 2003, at that time, the effect of selectively breeding had already appeared in the size of white flower clone. In the past several years, I have concentrated on the selective breeding of much smaller variations of Byblis. You can see: http://icps.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=...amp;thread=2929 or http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=31967 Hopefully, in the next several years, I will be able to have enough time for breeding F08 much more. photo 1: The flowers of F08 compared with F54. (F54 was also presented by Mr. Allen Lowrie in Leiden.) photo 2: The flowers of F08 compared with Byblis liniflora. photo 3: The flowers of F08 compared with a progeny clone of Byblis filifolia ICPS cultivar Goliath. Kind regards photo 1: The flowers of F08 compared with F54. photo 2: The flowers of F08 compared with Byblis liniflora. photo 3: The flowers of F08 compared with a progeny clone of Byblis filifolia ICPS cultivar Goliath. photo links changed (same photos): 2014/11/29
  20. Konnichiwa! new discovery????? I emailed Mr.Allen Lowrie in November, 2008. Because I had no idea why you mentioned, “a pulvinus on the pedicels of Byblis 'Goliath' is unusual". Also you thought the pulvinus was a cultivar trait of Byblis filifolia ICPS cultivar.Goliath. On October 29, 2008 You wrote on ICPS forum: reply 12 in http://icps.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=...amp;thread=2348 …But unfortunately, Byblis guehoi (which I think you were referring to) does not have a pulvinus on the pedicels such as Byblis 'Goliath' does,… On November 3, 2008 I wrote: reply 17 in http://icps.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=...2348&page=2 About the photo 7 and 8, In my opinion, the pulvinus in the photos is very common character of Byblis. (= In my opinion, the pulvinus in the photos is a very common character of Byblis.) There was an attachment in the reply that I had received from Mr.Allen Lowrie in November, 2008. It was his reply to you. It was a proof of the following. What he taught you & it was what time. --- You wrote: Also, have you noticed pulvinic appendages on any species or forms in the field? Mr.Allen Lowrie wrote: Yes I have. I have seen them on Byblis filifolia, Byblis guehoii and Byblis gigantea. See attached photos of Byblis lamellata. --- One of the photos was DSC02567 B.lamellata. = a pulvinus on Byblis lamellata Kind regards from the Far East Photo 7: deep pinkish mauve flowered smaller variation Photo 8: Byblis guehoi
  21. Dear Katie-san, Konnichiwa! I DO hope for your artificial pollinations succeed. Unfortunately, the descending pedicels do not always mean the success. A few years ago, I succeeded to obtain some seeds of Byblis species N.T. x Byblis guehoi. I do not sow the seed yet. Considering the chromosome number of Byblis guehoi, the F2 generation of this Hybrid might be very interesting. Byblis species N.T.: over all finer plant to 15cm very floriferous Litch field Northern Territory I do not know the chromosome number of this fantastic species though! Kind regards from the Far East
  22. Konnichiwa! Fernando-san visited Insectivorous Plant Society(Nippon Dental Univ.) on March 29, 2010. We spent happy time a little while ago. Dr. Kato & Dr. Hasebe (Fernando-san's ex-proffessors), Dr. Komiya, a few board members of IPS......talked about CPs, DNA and everything. Kind regards from the Far East Fernando-san investigated a Byblis specimen.
  23. Konnichiwa! Dear sativ-san & Dear Milos Sula-san, I agree with you in all your views. Dear Fernando-san, You made a few excellent replies to this thread. The 4 plants were taken last year. They were 5 months old after sowing. I did not use any growth control chemicals/hormones. After observing the clones, I believed they were same variation. commonly found and Nothing special. There was only one plant in each pot. At the same time, I did not believe that the 4 clones maintained "ICPS cultivar's status". Previously, on cp discussion group I wrote: 1)Advanced uniformity by sexual reproduction. Usually, reproducing by sexual reproduction loses the cultivar status traits even for an autogamous plant (self-fertilizing plant). The Sweet Pea is an autogamous plant (self-fertilizing plants and also a self-pollinated species). Therefore, we can fix the character in the tenth generation by a careful selection. The clone and progeny plants of the clone are worthy of cultivar status. Maintaining a cultivar's status by sexual reproduction in an allogamous plant clone is almost unsolvable. After sowing, it took seven months to obtain seeds (more than 10,000 from the 4 clones). Previously, on cp discussion group I wrote: 2)Improvement of cutting or TC propagation method I can make Tropical Byblis reproduce by both cuttings and TC propagation. At this moment, cuttings and TC propagations are not appropriate methods for tropical Byblis species. After the international CP conference in 2002, I showed deligates in my greenhouse a tetraploid Byblis filifolia “Pago Giant” clone. This tetraploid “Pago Giant” clone was smaller than a diploid clone. This tetraploid clone was maintained by cuttings. However, I cannot grow the tropical Byblis into beautiful specimens using cuttings or TC propagation. Finally, Accusation without evidence damages the honour of ICPS. Kind regards from the far east photo links changed (same photos): 2014/11/29
  24. Dear andycpuk-san! Thank you very much in advance! Kindest regard from the far east