Mags

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Mags last won the day on July 31 2011

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  • Birthday 04/10/1988

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  1. I grew a hamata on a south facing windowsill in my last house for several years. During the summer months I put shade cloth on the window to reduce the intensity of the light. Apart from keeping the window open at night to cool the plant I gave it no other special treatment. It did ok- it pitchered regularly, vined and produced a flower. However, the pitchers certainly didn't last as long as a greenhouse grown plant and often drooped their lids during warm spells. Unfortunately, I bought my own house which only had a west facing windowsill and the plant died over the winter for a variety of different reasons (4ft vine, sob!) So it can be done. However, no two windows are the same and what works for some may not work for others...
  2. Awesome vid! My sigma 30mm f1.4 just arrived in the post this morning
  3. Thanks for the replies everyone. I have zero experience with plant lighting and find the whole concept quite daunting! The area I would like to illuminate is roughly 80 x 80 cm. Was origionally looking for a couple of T5HO tubes but I can't source them locally and shipping from mainland UK to NI is quite expensive. I was thinking along the lines of something like this: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/125w-Blue-Spectrum-CFL-reflector-hydroponics-grow-light-/280755959501?pt=UK_HomeGarden_Garden_PlantsSeedsBulbs_JN&hash=item415e5bf6cd Metal Halides is something I looked into as well and am quite interested in, but don't fully understand and therefore am afraid of burning the house down!
  4. Having moved house the location where I grow my nepenthes and cephalotus will no longer get sufficient light to get them through the winter. I'm therefore planning to supplement the light they will receive through a west facing window with a single large CFL, or several smaller CFLs. I know the topic of lighting for CPs has been done to death, but having read through the archives there was one question that I couldn't quite answer. Is the 6400k spectrum sufficient for decent growth considering they will still receive some natural light from the window or will I need a combination of 6400k and 2700K? Any help appreciated! Thanks, Mark
  5. I'm a bit behind, mine will probably flower in about a week- my first Cephalotus flower too!
  6. Nepenthes x ventrata is a very hardy nepenthes and doesn't require this treatment at all. It is very easy to acclimate it to the lower humidity of your house. In answer to your question, you probably don't stress the plant very much by taking it to the shower 5 times a day, but you're almost certainly wasting your time - any rise in humidity is quickly lost again when you place the plant back on the windowsill. Leave the plant on the windowsill and see how it gets on, good light is more important than high humidity in this situation. Hope that helps, EDIT: Bah! Marcello beat me to it
  7. Thanks for the reply, that's made up my mind about giving it a go
  8. Good point! I'll probably start with it on a cooler windowsill then and see how it gets on... Thanks,
  9. Seems like a good place to start. How tolerant is it of high temps (30C+)? I have a nice bright conservatory in my new house and i'm starting to move my neps and cephalotus in and i'm tempted to try a heliamphora, I just fear that it'll fry the first time the sun comes out! Thanks,
  10. That's an amazing plant! I've been thinking about making my first foray into growing Heliamphora with this hybrid- it is great to see you have had success with this on a windowsill as I might be trying the same sometime soon.
  11. Here is a thread from Terraforums which is quite interesting: http://terraforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=127668
  12. If you have a south facing windowsill with good light and you can provide it with highland temperatures then it would have a good chance of doing well- much more likely to succeed than a villosa.
  13. Villosa is much more difficult than hamata. If you have a sunny windowsill you could probably grow hamata just fine without any need for a complicated cooling system...
  14. Thanks for clearing that up. It might be better known in Germany of the association between yourself and Thomas Carow but this is the first I had ever heard of it (and probably others) so not that ridiculous...