An D Smith

Full Members
  • Content Count

    408
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

2 Neutral

About An D Smith

  • Birthday 03/27/1972

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://
  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Bournemouth. UK
  • Interests
    Horticulture, fossils, archaeology, entomology, neolithic stone tools etc

Recent Profile Visitors

6,441 profile views
  1. I have had exactly the same thing appear on some of my Restrepia orchids, and the culprit, in my case, is a small, flattened, glossy brown snail, usually around 3mm across. Seen them? I think most heated greenhouses have them. The snails bore a tiny hole in the developing leaf/bud and by the time the leaf/bud has reached its full size, the hole is much enlarged. A right bloody nuisance! Other than squashing the little blighters on sight, I'm not sure what to do. I don't think they are attracted to conventional slug pellets. Cheers Andy
  2. Hi Mato The word 'Ultramafic' derives from the chemical symbols of the metals Magnesium (Mg) and Iron (Fe)and as you would expect, soils that are regarded as ultramafic tend to have a rather high content of these metals, as well other metals such as cadmium and nickel. I have been experimenting with Laterite (a chemically-weathered tropical clay) as a base componenet in cultivated ultramafic species (N. attenboroughii) and so far, the results have been quite promising. The high iron content of laterite (it is very heavy), coupled with the high magnesium content of freshly ground coffee (coff
  3. Hi Kevin I do not grow U. monanthos from the Hartz Mountains anymore, but I have seen it growing there in profusion, and the flower scapes only ever get to 2 - 3cm tall. As your flower scape is so much taller, I would say that yours is indeed U. dichotoma. I introduced seed of this species, from the Hartz Mountains, in 2007 - with seed sent all over Europe and the UK, as well as the USA and Canada, and all of this was pure U. monanthos. I am sure there have been plenty of other collections by other people and maybe some of these were wrongly labelled? Utricularia uniflora, which is the only
  4. I was sent this link to a video showing the largest ants nest in the world, or at least it is certainly very, very large!! Check it out: http://www.dump.com/biggestant/ Have a great weekend Cheers Andy
  5. Just stumbled across an article describing a new method of insect capture in Nepenthes gracilis My link Check it out Cheers Andy
  6. Hi Wacker The plant is the Aroid Arisarum vulgare, or another closely-related species and is not carnivorous, although it does trap live flies within its flowers, but these are released a few days later so they can pollinate another flower. A lovely little plant, I have a fantastic clump of Arisarum proboscideum in my garden. They are commonly known as Mouse Plants. Hope this is of some help Cheers Andy
  7. Hi Andy, i would like to know if you would be prepard to send to South Africa and what the price will be for one seedling from each location type. I think if the package is kept small we could (If you are OK with this) to dispense with Permits. Alternatively I would be prepared to pay foe a Phyto Cert as well.

  8. Hi Andy, i would like to know if you would be prepard to send to South Africa and what the price will be for one seedling from each location type. I think if the package is kept small we could (If you are OK with this) to dispense with Permits. Alternatively I would be prepared to pay foe a Phyto Cert as well.

  9. Hi There

    I have just seen your post regarding your spare N. rigidifolia. I am very interested. Is it still available? I can swap some seedling N. attenboroughii, burbidgeae, bongso, ceciliae etc.

    Let me know if you are interested.

    Cheers

    Andy

  10. Hi There

    I have just seen your post regarding your spare N. rigidifolia. I am very interested. Is it still available? I can swap some seedling N. attenboroughii, burbidgeae, bongso, ceciliae etc.

    Let me know if you are interested.

    Cheers

    Andy

  11. Hi Marlon At first I thought it was a Frangipani (Plumeria sp.) but looking at the flowers it obviously isn't. I am afraid to say that I have absolutely no idea!! Nice plant though Good luck Andy
  12. Hi there Dorset and the New Forest are very good spots. The following species can be seen here: Drosera anglica Drosera intermedia Drosera rotundifolia Drosera x obovata Drosera x beliziana Sarracenia purpurea Dionaea muscipula Pinguicula lusitanica Pinguicula vulgaris Utricularia bremii Utricularia intermedia Utricularia minor Utricularia stygia PM me if you would like any location details. Cheers, and have a sunny weekend Andy
  13. Hi EvulFarmer EvulFarmer wrote "The plant grows for over the year in my lowland terrarium only few cm under the FLL" Maybe this is the cause of your problems? N. hamata is most definitely a HIGHLAND species. Cheers Andy
  14. Hi There How about the three Queensland Sundews; Droseras adelae, prolifera and schizandra? All three love hot, humid conditions and do well in lower light than other species. Good luck Andy