Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/18/2021 in Posts

  1. Pinguicula season is advancing in southern Spain. Here, a large flowering clump of P. vallisneriifolia. One of my favourite species, fortunately still with several healthy populations with hundreds to thousands of plants. This species typically grows on calcareous cliffs that are very wet year round, often with some running water. Cold in winter, with frequent frosts (but not or rarely freezing solid), and hot in summer, although the places where the plants sit remain relatively fresh. It is one of the largest species, large adult plants may have leaves over 25 cm long! I hope you like it.
    5 points
  2. Hi all, the same procedure as every year: My plants of U. menziesii showing first flowers after division and repotting. In the german cp society GFP i have posted a complete manual of this beautiful species.... best regards Tobias
    4 points
  3. Droseara auriculata growing beside major urban motorway in Auckland, New Zealand
    4 points
  4. Hello everyone, I wish to share with you some photos of a bog garden I made in my parents-in-law's garden. It is located in south center Poland. Hardiness zone 6B. Last autumn there was -15°C (5°F). Basically all plants lived through that including D. arcturi. That peat bog is in its third year after building. In some places it is too wet and Sarracenia produce phyllodia more than pitchers, so the soil humidity is the key factor for nice pitchers. Of course direct sunlight is also super important. I am experimenting with species, that might be hardy like U. dichotoma and U. monanthos and proved to be hardy. Darlingtonia califormica also lived well, but I think, that too much Seramis in previous mix might have caused its regress, so now it will have regular Sphagnum:perlite mixture. I hope it will improve now. I suspect D. regia could be also hardy, which I will check on the second peat bog made last year. This peat bog proved me that even in center Poland Sarracenia can look as good as in a glass house. I take basically no care of it. I visit it from time to time. I also don't have to water it, since it has around 600l water reservoir built inside it, so it keeps enough moisture to live through the most hottest days. Only when the Sphagnum dries too much I water it or refill the water reservoir a bit, because I don't want the Sphagnum to look unattractive. I should make a third acidic beat bog for Sphagnum carpet specifically, so it would keep loads of moisture, but there are not that many attractive plants I could plant there... and there is no space for it. I hope that below photos will inspire some of you to create one in your own garden if you have a possibility to. Hope you enjoy! S. 'Carnilandia' Sarracenia oreophila x S. alata 'black tube' Sarracenia flava var. ornata x S. oreophila "De Kalb" clone B Sarracenia flava var. ornata (Giardino Carnivoro) In front: Sarracenia leucophylla x S. flava var. rugelii X S. x moorei 'Adrian Slack' clone 1 Sarracenia leucophylla Very white, thin red veins. Meeting Mira S. Leucophylla L30 Red & White Sarracenia 'Dino Almacolle' H126 Sarracenia flava var. rubricorpora F102 Sarracenia flava red tube x S. alata red H26 Sarracenia flava var. rubricorpora F161 L: Sarracenia flava var. ornata F47, R: Sarracenia flava var. rubricorpora F161 (Mike King) S. 'Tygo' Sarracenia x excellens Eddie Bates H152 Od lewej: S. flava var. flava, Anthocyanin free. Shallotte, S. 'Goldie', S. 'Leah Wiklerson' z prawej: S. 'Leah Wilkerson' x S. 'Adrian Slack' Sarracenia flava var. atropurpurea clone F130G S. oreophila O22 From left: S. flava var. flava, Anthocyanin free. Shallotte, S. 'Goldie', S. 'Leah Wiklerson', on the right: S. 'Leah Wilkerson' x S. 'Adrian Slack' Front plain: S. 'Judith Soper', back plain: S. leucophylla L31A x ‘A Porais’ S. alata var. ornata Heavy vein A16 Calopogon tuberosus D. fuschii var. alba D. fuschii var. alba Eleorchis japonica Eleorchis japonica var. alba Pogonia ophioglossoides Carex pulicaris Drosera binata - does very well grows to its full potential and flowers very well too. There are many on the peat bog, but it is hard to take a good picture of them. D. intermedia D. intermedia x filiformis Dionaea muscipula region with D. filiformis D. muscipula 'Red Dragon' D. muscipula 'Kronos' D. muscipula 'Kayan' D. muscipula 'Warewolf' Possibly D. muscipula 'Pink Venus' but it might also be 'Red Dragon' Anoplius cf. viaticus - poor spider. :/ I saw the whole thing how the wasp stung chased, stunged, dragged and burried the spider on the peat bog. :/ Thymelicus spp. on S. oreophila
    4 points
  5. My collection has expanded quite a bit since my last post here Here's a couple of my favorites- Hurricane Creek White Mike King clone F And Splinter Hill from Mike King- The Bog Island is doing really well- Overall, it's a lot of fun collecting these and hope you enjoy the photos!
    4 points
  6. in the weekend of the 9th and 10th of October Carnivora will host an EEE! Well, unless the rules relating to the COVID situation change of course. The Botanical garden in Leiden has agreed to host this weekend, so great location... check! As we are all dying to get a descent event on the menu again let's keep our fingers crossed that the sailing is smooth. More details will follow as they develop.
    4 points
  7. 2007 purchased from Hampshire Carnivorous plants as a semi-mature plant (probable origin Borneo Exotics) Lower pitchers in 2022 after travelling to Cornwall and then to Germany (between 2010 and 2011) Intermediate pitcher 2022 Top view 2022 Upper pitcher 2022
    3 points
  8. Only some snapshots of todays bests
    3 points
  9. Very interesting Cephalotus germination process I mentioned this post on the following site. https://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?/topic/37940-cephalotus-seed-germination/ Fortunately, I was able to take a picture and would like to share it with you. Dr. Hasebe, who noticed that I was removing the seed coats of some plant species, taught me an interesting literature on the germination of Cephalotus. This article is on a pay site and cannot be accessed. https://www.publish.csiro.au/BT/BT19053 I wanted to share a photo with people like me who couldn't read this document. I have sown Cephalotus many times, but I was unaware of this interesting germination process as I am only half awake at all times. I mentioned Utricularia species in a forum as an exception to plants those roots do not first emerge from seeds. https://www.terraforums.com/forums/threads/how-old-is-too-old.142820/ I have to add Cephalotus to it. https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51333047133_442c94cdac_c.jpg https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51333832245_cf2d3eb1d8_c.jpg https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51333047103_df7f532892_c.jpg https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51669945008_6fbe8e24fa_c.jpg https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51670390504_c8e97d0c21_c.jpg https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51668906507_44a82c7ea3_c.jpg https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51670582395_55719a33bc_c.jpg
    3 points
  10. Drosera spatulata is present in large numbers at the mountainous location below in the temperate North Island, New Zealand. As can be seen, they are happy on the exposed moss covered rhyolitic surfaces.
    3 points
  11. Near the 'Bory Tucholskie' National Park Drosera intermedia -
    3 points
  12. Hi Damiano, sorry, your Darlingtonia looks dead. It will not recover if the rhizome is completely brown even if the pitcher tips are still green. You could cut the rhizome to remove all brown parts until you get to the whitish/green part, but probably it is too late now and nothing wil be left. Darlingtonia rots easily if the substrate gets too hot or if the plant got too hot during shipment. Next time: Find a spot with good sun in the moroning and avoid direct sun after noon. Darlingtonia likes a lot of light as long as it is cool but it will live happily in semi shade when it gets hot. Adding ice to the water will produce extreme temperature changes that most plants don't like. Rather: Use a big pot - it will stay cool longer that way. Surround the pot with other pots or lower the pot in a peat/sand plunge, so the sun can't shine onto the pot. Don't use a lid / glass cover. A place with good air movement will help to keep the plant cool by evaporation. A Sphagnum cover is good as long as it does not overgrow the plant. Spray now and then. As long as the Sphagnum is happy Darlingtonia will thrive too. Eric
    3 points
  13. I really have fun growing 'Squat'
    3 points
  14. Update: Utricularia longifolia “multi-flowered scape” Araponga, Minas Gerais state, Brazil The photos were taken on May 25th. There are seeds that are likely to germinate from now on, but they will not be able to be separated, so I would transplant them. In the first place I didn't count how many seeds I had sown, so it's not appropriate to mention germination rates. But to put it bluntly, I'm satisfied. There are still a lot of seeds because I just sown a part of the packet. Then I would like to pick up seeds that look decent appearance and examine the germination rate.
    3 points
  15. Hi folks A quick introduction. I'm Dave, and I've recently taken over the role of Internet Officer for the Carnivorous Plant Society. That comes with responsibility for managing the CPUK Forum as well as the CPS website and various other bits and pieces. I haven't previously been an active member of this forum although I have referred to it for cultivation advice from time to time. I do have some experience looking after other forums and I'll do my best to keep this one in good shape. The Society has been through a bit of a rough patch over the past few years. I'm one of a number of new members of the Management Committee who are working to get things back into smooth operation and to provide a better experience for the Society's members. CPS members should have received notification of the AGM which is being held at the end of May via Zoom - we'd really appreciate your participation to help us set a positive direction for the Society over the coming year. If you haven't received an invitation, please let me know and I'll look into it. I look forward to supporting your community :)
    2 points
  16. Drosera cistiflora 2022:
    2 points
  17. Questo cephalotus è un qualcosa di indescrivibile...... Pronunciato col peristoma,le costole, il cappello.......ha caratteristiche che non hanno altri miei cephalotus
    2 points
  18. Pianta molto vigorosa ,colorazione bellissima ,particolare la bocca stretta , corpo allungato , nato da seme.....tutto da osservare.....molto interessante
    2 points
  19. Hi Jon all the native sundews will be dormant at this time of year and will have reduced greatly in size - as will native butterworts. They will reappear in the Spring. Generally speaking, carnivorous plants are slow to produce mature plants from seed (years in some cases) which is likely to be frustrating for a 5 year old! Please PM me If your son would like some freebie sarracenia (north american pitcher plants). These are also dormant but will return to growth in the Spring. There are some growing guides on the CPS website which offer some good advice. cheers Dennis
    2 points
  20. Hello everyone, this summer I visited this fantastic place in the Italian Alps, you walk a lot but when you arrive it's a real paradise ... The stream that cuts through the valley comes directly from the glacier, and creates these swamps, full of sphagnum, I have looked carefully for sundew but have not seen any... However, there were a lot of pinguicula at the edge of the creek too ...
    2 points
  21. WOWWW they look great!
    2 points
  22. Utricularia livida & dichotoma Utricularia dichotoma
    2 points
  23. Although in full sun and cold this cephalotus remains green.
    2 points
  24. So this summer I had 5 plants. At the peak of summer I was watering them every 2 days and apparently it wasn't enough because I lost 3 of them. The remaining two plants I watered every day and they survived. My media is mostly mineral so what worked for other growers (ie watering less) didn't work in my conditions. It was interesting to observe that they shrank to almost half their size during the hottest months. Little dew (althought they kept catching) and they lost their upright claw-like form. Then we had a week when there was very strong morning dew (everything looked wet like it had just rained) and they almost doubled in size with big droplets of dew and went right back to their upright form. It was amazing to see how they reacted so positively to morning dew. Here they are now 3 months later.
    2 points
  25. Sorry guys, haven't really got the hang off uploading photos on here let's hope this works...
    2 points
  26. Or you could look into buying RO water from a local aquarium shop. Mine charges 17p/litre, many charge less. Guy
    2 points
  27. I dry it up and sift out all cource materials and reuse. If it is not broken down it is still good. The rest goes in the compost and will eventually be part of the garden soil. I do the same for all my potted plants, not only cps.
    2 points
  28. New cultivar, Cephalotus follicularis ‘Squat’. Deserving of cultivar status in my mind as its pitcher shape is very distinctive. https://cpn.carnivorousplants.org/articles/CPNv50n2p87_91.pdf?fbclid=IwAR39SwYzPtovj0yCo--oyR64mibcznV2r4PoYWdPy_Yz2OYld2OrG4ZT2T0
    2 points
  29. Here is mine C "Big Boy".
    2 points
  30. My open day this year is planned for Sat 3rd July 2021. 12-5. All welcome. Plants for sale and refreshments available.
    2 points
  31. Hello everyone, This Monday me with my friend visited the small bog near the Minsk. Unfortunately, there are only Drosera rotundifolia and nothing more of other carnivorous plants. Seems that they started growing from hibernacula quite recently. They are veeery small and partially are inside the sphagnum moss. General view of the sunny open space of the bog: TDS: And a lot of plants:
    2 points
  32. Cephalotus 'Bananito' is seedgrown C. 'Eden Black" x self. The clone has unusual tall, slim and quite elongated pitchers in the adult pitchers... Cephalotus 'Bananito' left versus its parent C. 'Eden Black' right
    2 points
  33. Krasne Lake (Nature Reserve near the village Lipczynek, NW Poland) Drosera intermedia Drosera intermedia and Lycopodiella inundata
    2 points
  34. It took about a month to show up. Like a pint of Guinness, 'Good things come to those who wait.'
    1 point
  35. Era una piccola divisione senza radici....ci sono voluti 3 mesi per farlo ambientare.....mi ha subito stupito la sua facilità nel diventare scuro....
    1 point
  36. If you want to grow sundews from seed. Get yourself some capensis seeds. They grow to almost adult size in a growing season, but cant stand much of frost. Its a coupple of euros spent and you can shoose between protecting them in winter or just treat them as anuals. Anyway, that seems like a better option to inspire a kid. Br Magnus
    1 point
  37. Hello everyone! Glad to be around. I'm into 'our thing' for about three years. Started doing it very actively in last year.
    1 point
  38. No.This one of the Carnivoria clones I don't remember number is very old clone.This clone was weak and die I ask David Svarc about this clone when I was visiting his greenhouse and this clone no longer exists only for some private growers if someone have it yet and managed to keep it.
    1 point
  39. My guess is another slackii, maybe from a root growing close to the surface , have to wait and see
    1 point
  40. Montecore Green phalanx Pompom Demogorgone Dambala
    1 point
  41. Cephalotus 'bananito' pitchers are much more elongated.
    1 point
  42. Hi all... A mate of mine gave me some venus flytrap seeds which started me buying more seeds online from China for more carnivorous plant seeds.. When I received the seeds from China they at 1st looked about right so planted them, ( they weee supposed to be a mix of vfts and sundews) but after about 5 min later of watering them I noticed the seeds have an appearance of miniature frogspawn or as if the seeds are covered in a gel coat. (Top pic ) Also my mates vft seeds were planted a few weeks back but look nothing like vfts.Could the seedlings be sarracenia perhaps? (Bottoman pic ) top pic are seeds from China but don't think they're vft o
    1 point
  43. http://www.carnivorousplants.org/cpn/Species/v29n4p116_122.html#hummers The picture is very poor, so how anyone can draw any conclusions based on it is beyond me.
    1 point
  44. Here are some pictures of a local bog I visited through summer. The site only contains drosera rotundifolia from what I could see. A few shots of the habitat Now onto the plants Hope you all enjoyed it
    1 point
  45. It was earlyish afternoon and we had found what we'd been seeking at Falls Creek within an hour. We had the choice of heading to either a lowland location where we may find some late flowering Utricularia beaugleholei or a detour to visit another alpine mountain, Mt. Buffalo where I knew tht a beautiful deep red late emerging form of Drosera auriculata could be found. We chose Mt. Buffalo as the temps were in the low 40 Cs on at the base of the mountains but a comfortable 27 C on the alps. We arrived mid afternoon and headed for the spot that I believed we would find te D. auriculata. Unfortunately the car would only take us far far before the end of the road n neither of us could realy be bothered walking and sort fo a distance so we aborted that search. On the way there I had noticed some splashes of purple around the margin of Lake Catani. I was confident that these were patches of U. dichotoma. I was right. The inflorescences were very tall compared to the other forms we'd seen the previous day and many more flowers were clustered together. This form appeared very similar to the tuberous form that I had discovered about 10 years ago at a lower altitude. This time I did not think to check for tubers. There was also some variation in flower colour with a pale mauve coloured form quite common. the pale form You'll notice there havn't been many close ups of the Utriularia flowers. This was bcause I wasn't keen on laying in water to get th shots. Call me soft. The final stop at Mt. Buffalo was a small stream that cut under the main road. Alongside the road growing on the rocks were small colony of Drosera gracilis. One of the few chances we'd had to get a clear shot at the plants. From there, 5 hours later we were home. We'd travelled 1400kms and gone as high as 1800m in altitude. It's amazing what you can get done in less than 2 days. We didn't find the orchids that we were hoping, but were more that compensated with the amount of CPs we found at a time of year that most would consider the poorest time of year in this part of the world.
    1 point
  46. The main reason for visiting this location was the hope of finding Utricularia monanthos. I'd never seen the species in its natural habitat before after missing a previous trip a little later in the year. This time the trip had been organised perfectly. It took us a while to find the first few flowers and Drosera arcturi was abundant along the margins of the wetter areas. U. monanthos growing with a small D. arcturi at the base of a small rock. This rock is visible in some of the previous habitat images. Growing at the margin of a D. arcturi colony. As we wandered around we found more and more (with D. arcturi) and more
    1 point