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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/19/2020 in Posts

  1. Hello and a happy new year, like every year my U. menziesii are in flower:
    8 points
  2. It was suggested that, since Brexit, the UK & EU sales & trading sections be separated. This is due to Customs, CITES & Phytosanitary certificate requirements. I've done this now, although there's no way I'm going to go through and move historical posts around to put them in the right section. That would be a hell of a lot of work.
    8 points
  3. I'd like to welcome Marcel van den Broek to the moderating staff of CPUK Forum. Marcel is eagle eyed for spammers and I'm sure he'll do a great job helping to keep things clean and tidy. Thank you for your service, @Marcel van den Broek
    7 points
  4. Pinguicula season is advancing in southern Spain. Here, a large flowering clump of P. vallisneriifolia. One of my favourite species, fortunately still with several healthy populations with hundreds to thousands of plants. This species typically grows on calcareous cliffs that are very wet year round, often with some running water. Cold in winter, with frequent frosts (but not or rarely freezing solid), and hot in summer, although the places where the plants sit remain relatively fresh. It is one of the largest species, large adult plants may have leaves over 25 cm long! I hope you like it.
    5 points
  5. Here are the first photos of my greenhouse this year. I'll add to them as the season progresses. Mainly flavas on this side: Hybrids in the centre: Alata (not in shot), leucophylla, oreophila and sundry other plants on the right: As I've repotted nearly all my plants I have one or two divisions kept under the bench: And finally for now, here's a photo of my Goldie which fortunately has survived brown rhizome rot:
    4 points
  6. Hello everyone, I wish to share with you some photos of a bog garden I made in my parents-in-law's garden. It is located in south center Poland. Hardiness zone 6B. Last autumn there was -15°C (5°F). Basically all plants lived through that including D. arcturi. That peat bog is in its third year after building. In some places it is too wet and Sarracenia produce phyllodia more than pitchers, so the soil humidity is the key factor for nice pitchers. Of course direct sunlight is also super important. I am experimenting with species, that might be hardy like U. dichotoma and U. monanthos and proved to be hardy. Darlingtonia califormica also lived well, but I think, that too much Seramis in previous mix might have caused its regress, so now it will have regular Sphagnum:perlite mixture. I hope it will improve now. I suspect D. regia could be also hardy, which I will check on the second peat bog made last year. This peat bog proved me that even in center Poland Sarracenia can look as good as in a glass house. I take basically no care of it. I visit it from time to time. I also don't have to water it, since it has around 600l water reservoir built inside it, so it keeps enough moisture to live through the most hottest days. Only when the Sphagnum dries too much I water it or refill the water reservoir a bit, because I don't want the Sphagnum to look unattractive. I should make a third acidic beat bog for Sphagnum carpet specifically, so it would keep loads of moisture, but there are not that many attractive plants I could plant there... and there is no space for it. I hope that below photos will inspire some of you to create one in your own garden if you have a possibility to. Hope you enjoy! S. 'Carnilandia' Sarracenia oreophila x S. alata 'black tube' Sarracenia flava var. ornata x S. oreophila "De Kalb" clone B Sarracenia flava var. ornata (Giardino Carnivoro) In front: Sarracenia leucophylla x S. flava var. rugelii X S. x moorei 'Adrian Slack' clone 1 Sarracenia leucophylla Very white, thin red veins. Meeting Mira S. Leucophylla L30 Red & White Sarracenia 'Dino Almacolle' H126 Sarracenia flava var. rubricorpora F102 Sarracenia flava red tube x S. alata red H26 Sarracenia flava var. rubricorpora F161 L: Sarracenia flava var. ornata F47, R: Sarracenia flava var. rubricorpora F161 (Mike King) S. 'Tygo' Sarracenia x excellens Eddie Bates H152 Od lewej: S. flava var. flava, Anthocyanin free. Shallotte, S. 'Goldie', S. 'Leah Wiklerson' z prawej: S. 'Leah Wilkerson' x S. 'Adrian Slack' Sarracenia flava var. atropurpurea clone F130G S. oreophila O22 From left: S. flava var. flava, Anthocyanin free. Shallotte, S. 'Goldie', S. 'Leah Wiklerson', on the right: S. 'Leah Wilkerson' x S. 'Adrian Slack' Front plain: S. 'Judith Soper', back plain: S. leucophylla L31A x ‘A Porais’ S. alata var. ornata Heavy vein A16 Calopogon tuberosus D. fuschii var. alba D. fuschii var. alba Eleorchis japonica Eleorchis japonica var. alba Pogonia ophioglossoides Carex pulicaris Drosera binata - does very well grows to its full potential and flowers very well too. There are many on the peat bog, but it is hard to take a good picture of them. D. intermedia D. intermedia x filiformis Dionaea muscipula region with D. filiformis D. muscipula 'Red Dragon' D. muscipula 'Kronos' D. muscipula 'Kayan' D. muscipula 'Warewolf' Possibly D. muscipula 'Pink Venus' but it might also be 'Red Dragon' Anoplius cf. viaticus - poor spider. :/ I saw the whole thing how the wasp stung chased, stunged, dragged and burried the spider on the peat bog. :/ Thymelicus spp. on S. oreophila
    4 points
  7. My collection has expanded quite a bit since my last post here Here's a couple of my favorites- Hurricane Creek White Mike King clone F And Splinter Hill from Mike King- The Bog Island is doing really well- Overall, it's a lot of fun collecting these and hope you enjoy the photos!
    4 points
  8. in the weekend of the 9th and 10th of October Carnivora will host an EEE! Well, unless the rules relating to the COVID situation change of course. The Botanical garden in Leiden has agreed to host this weekend, so great location... check! As we are all dying to get a descent event on the menu again let's keep our fingers crossed that the sailing is smooth. More details will follow as they develop.
    4 points
  9. Something people from the East coast of North America probably see frequently, but for me it is very exciting to induce Utricularia inflata flowering at home, after a few years growing it (container with clean water obviously just for the photo). It is a very elegant plant, the peduncle ca. 15-20 cm long, and can get much longer. And the flowers are nicely scented.
    4 points
  10. Here they are. Plants of a friend of mine
    4 points
  11. A bunch of pucs from my tropical greenhiuse, some are from 2020 others more recent :) received_719069172303552.webp received_5680486071976977.webp received_127415405903678.webp
    4 points
  12. Hello all, at this link of Italian CP Society website - https://www.aipcnet.it/carnivorous-docs/ - you can find and download, in addition to some interesting Pdf-English version of some articles published on our journal, the following "Special Issues", numbers of our newsletter completely devoted to one subject: - “The Mexican Pinguicula” - by Gabriele Basso - “The Drosera petiolaris complex” - by Maurizio Saroldi - “A tour of the Venezuelan Gran Sabana and some of its Tepuis” -by Andy Smith - “Carnivorous field trip in Abruzzo” – by Gabriele Basso - And the new “Expedition to Western Australia” – by Boaz Ng Here some pictures from the new PDF “Expedition to Western Australia”. Maurizio Saroldi, AIPC Editor
    4 points
  13. Cephalotus 'Bananito' is seedgrown C. 'Eden Black" x self. The clone has unusual tall, slim and quite elongated pitchers in the adult pitchers... Cephalotus 'Bananito' left versus its parent C. 'Eden Black' right
    4 points
  14. One of the early wet season Drosera, part of the Petiolaris Complex. Interestingly, in an area about 1 kilometre long by 100 metres wide (between canopied woodland forest and wet season inundated ground) it almost carpeted the ground and was the only Drosera present. Habitat: generally open area with very little or no canopy, soil a sandy loam with lateritic gravel sometimes with scattered larger lateritic rocks.
    4 points
  15. Hello everyone, There are a lot of amazing pictures of heliamphora and a lot of talented growers with perfect plants growing in perfect conditions. I've been growing heliamphora in amateur conditions in my bedroom for almost 8 years now and I just wanted to share that it's possible to have nice plants without extra night temperature drops or expensive cooling systems. Having said that, I'm a bit of a plant freak and I'd love to provide my plants with the best conditions possible, so I'm constantly thinking of employing an efficient and cost-effective cooling system. In my situation, I'm thinking of buying an air-conditionin unit for next summer to cool the entire bedroom. Currently, I'm growing 21 species, but my collection has really expanded this year (almost half the species I have). For now, my plants are grown in a grow chamber under full-spectrum grow LED lights. I use a fogger to control humidity and temperature. There are 2 PC fans for moving the air inside and one exhaust fan in the top part to exhaust the warm air (from lights). The temperature depends on the ambient room temperature. Now, and during the whole winter/spring, the conditions are right - day temperature max 24°C, night temperatures 18-14 °C, based on the temperature outside. Summer is harsh - day temperature around 27 °C, night 22 - 20 °C - plants stunt their growth, turn more green than red, but nothing dies. Some species develop red spots on their older leaves from fungus attacks, but still continue to grow. Here are some current pictures. There are still "summer leaves" co you can see the effect of not optimal conditions on the plants. This is how the whole setup looks: And here are some detailed pictures of selected plants: Heliamphora uncinata (M.Schach clone) Heliamphora parva Heliamphora heterodoxa (Gran Sabana) Heliamphora neblinae (Cerro de la Neblina) Heliamphora purpurascens Heliamphora collina (or H. spec. Venamo, M.Schach clone) Heliamphora pulchella (Amuri hairless)
    4 points
  16. Drosophyllum lusitanicum is good catcher of mosquitos. It seems they catch only males. They have large antenaes, females don't have only small ones.
    4 points
  17. Drosera spatulata is present in large numbers at the mountainous location below in the temperate North Island, New Zealand. As can be seen, they are happy on the exposed moss covered rhyolitic surfaces.
    3 points
  18. Now that 2020 is ending, only the photos of what I saw remain.
    3 points
  19. Near the 'Bory Tucholskie' National Park Drosera intermedia -
    3 points
  20. Hi Damiano, sorry, your Darlingtonia looks dead. It will not recover if the rhizome is completely brown even if the pitcher tips are still green. You could cut the rhizome to remove all brown parts until you get to the whitish/green part, but probably it is too late now and nothing wil be left. Darlingtonia rots easily if the substrate gets too hot or if the plant got too hot during shipment. Next time: Find a spot with good sun in the moroning and avoid direct sun after noon. Darlingtonia likes a lot of light as long as it is cool but it will live happily in semi shade when it gets hot. Adding ice to the water will produce extreme temperature changes that most plants don't like. Rather: Use a big pot - it will stay cool longer that way. Surround the pot with other pots or lower the pot in a peat/sand plunge, so the sun can't shine onto the pot. Don't use a lid / glass cover. A place with good air movement will help to keep the plant cool by evaporation. A Sphagnum cover is good as long as it does not overgrow the plant. Spray now and then. As long as the Sphagnum is happy Darlingtonia will thrive too. Eric
    3 points
  21. I really have fun growing 'Squat'
    3 points
  22. Update: Utricularia longifolia “multi-flowered scape” Araponga, Minas Gerais state, Brazil The photos were taken on May 25th. There are seeds that are likely to germinate from now on, but they will not be able to be separated, so I would transplant them. In the first place I didn't count how many seeds I had sown, so it's not appropriate to mention germination rates. But to put it bluntly, I'm satisfied. There are still a lot of seeds because I just sown a part of the packet. Then I would like to pick up seeds that look decent appearance and examine the germination rate.
    3 points
  23. Drosera pauciflora (Ivory/soft yellow colored, Malmesbury South-Africa) February 2021
    3 points
  24. Droseara auriculata growing beside major urban motorway in Auckland, New Zealand
    2 points
  25. 2 points
  26. Sorry guys, haven't really got the hang off uploading photos on here let's hope this works...
    2 points
  27. Or you could look into buying RO water from a local aquarium shop. Mine charges 17p/litre, many charge less. Guy
    2 points
  28. I dry it up and sift out all cource materials and reuse. If it is not broken down it is still good. The rest goes in the compost and will eventually be part of the garden soil. I do the same for all my potted plants, not only cps.
    2 points
  29. The story began on 9-8-2020 ! I bought the plants from Harro Heidt a very nice and well known grower from Germany and he send them to me on 9-8-2020 very well packed and poted! The plants were stay to Germany until 30-9-20 DHL could not find them anywere in Germany althouth Harro did anything that he could to find the plants ! I receive them in Greece after 64 days of shipping on 13-10-2020 and all that time the cephalotus ware in dark! As you will see the plants after so many days without the light they lost all the green tissue leafs and pitchers and they produse a white new growth without leafs or pitchers! To avoide sunburns the plants stay in a shade the first week , the plants show new growth 3 weeks after I receive them and then I put them in a suny windshield. I treat them with two systemic fungicides when I receive them first for Botrytis (Captan ) and second LEIMAY S Amisulbrom 20% for downy mildew. The plants on 9-8-20 ! The plants on 13-10-20 after 64 days of shipping! The plants on 10-11-2020 almost a month after I receive them!
    2 points
  30. Here is mine C "Big Boy".
    2 points
  31. My open day this year is planned for Sat 3rd July 2021. 12-5. All welcome. Plants for sale and refreshments available.
    2 points
  32. Dionaea 'Blanche hermine' Dionaea "Naja"
    2 points
  33. Hi All, Newbie here with some photos etc of my S.Asbo from Southwest CP last year. I wanted one for ages and took the plunge, I wasn't disappointed at all, even though it cost me £50.00. I hope you like the photos as it seems (from my googleing) that there is little information out there on these.. (7) 'Sarracenia Asbo' Trumpet Pitcher Plant - YouTube (7) Sarracenia Asbo unboxing - YouTube Enjoy. Regards, Chris Staffordshire, UK.
    2 points
  34. Dirk Ventham’s Giant was not originally grown by Adrian Slack, this is misleading information. I should know as I raised it. Dirk Venthem.
    2 points
  35. I made a Belfast sink bog couple of years ago and it is really developing well. I was worried (probably needlessly) of the bottom getting anoxic so my setup is maybe a little complex. I sealed the drain hole and lined with plastic sheeting, and put somee (quarter mm) stainless steel mesh over the overflow so water could get out and not compost. I put 2 pieces of plastic tubing (about 5cm dia) in 2 corners reaching from top to bottom of the sink, and with lots of drill holes near the base of these to act as water feeds. I layered the fill- about 5cm lime free sand and the base into which the plastic pipes are embedded, then mostly filled with peat/perlite/sand mix and at the top 5cm of peat/sand (so the perlite does not show on the surface). The fill level is a couple of cm below the lip (and rather higher than the overflow) I water it mostly through the pipes with the idea that oxygenated water goes straight to the bottom and passes outwards through the sand; the rest of the water goes on top. It is planted up with 2 (shortish) S. flavas, 2 S. purpurea, a S. purpurea/minor hybrid and a S. purpurea/leucophilla hybrid, as well as a clump of D. filiformis. Between these are a couple of small species of self seeded Drosera, some hardy Pings and some self seeded U. bisquamata (I am going to remove some of these as the Sarracenia get larger and the surface gets shaded. Some Sphagnim has established around the pipe entrances (nicely hiding the plastic). I have already had to thin out the D. filiformis as it did very well.
    2 points
  36. Hello all, at this link of Italian CP Society website - https://www.aipcnet.it/carnivorous-docs/ - you can find and download, in addition to some interesting Pdf-English version of some articles published on our journal, the following "Special Issues", numbers of our newsletter completely devoted to one subject: - “The Mexican Pinguicula” - by Gabriele Basso - “The Drosera petiolaris complex” - by Maurizio Saroldi - “A tour of the Venezuelan Gran Sabana and some of its Tepuis” -by Andy Smith - “Carnivorous field trip in Abruzzo” – by Gabriele Basso - And the new “Expedition to Western Australia” – by Boaz Ng Here some pictures from the new PDF “Expedition to Western Australia”. Maurizio Saroldi, AIPC Editor
    2 points
  37. Just a suggestion. Could it be D. spatulata the spoon-leaved sundew? I am not an expert but those leaves do appear spoon shaped and it appears very similar to my D. spatulata. However, I do know that D. tokaiensis is D. (spatulata x rotundifolia) so there are very clear similarities between tokaiensis and spatulata. Kind regards, Rob
    2 points
  38. 2 points
  39. Hello I have some available but I do not ship to the USA
    2 points
  40. Krasne Lake (Nature Reserve near the village Lipczynek, NW Poland) Drosera intermedia Drosera intermedia and Lycopodiella inundata
    2 points
  41. Welcome, Anthony.
    1 point
  42. I'd repot the small one at the level it is at the moment, and repot the larger one a bit further down in the compost than it is now. These are fairly resilient plants, and yours look healthy, so should survive whatever you do to them. Within reason! Guy
    1 point
  43. They do not need terrariums nor high humidity, I would take the lids off to increase ventilaton thereby reducing mould and take the cover off the Capensis pots entirely. Also after 3 years or so I would repot to reinvigourate the medium, that will help the plants, and at the same time loose the terrarium. Put them outside if you have the opportunity to give them all more light. Cheers Steve
    1 point
  44. What has worked for me specifically for dionaea ( venus fly traps) is to submerge the plant completely in rain water for one day. You maybe will have to repeat this until the aphids have all died. The first time will kill most but sometimes eggs will hatch later on so the chances are there could be more aphids. Look mostly under the leaves and on the stem .. that's where they like to hide. With a magnifying glass you can easily see them .. I used my iPhone with a magnifying app to take the photos.
    1 point
  45. Yes, it is normal... dosera rotundifolia makes a lot of leaf pullings;-)
    1 point
  46. Drosera regia emerging from dormancy. My plants are in a greenhouse and receive full sun in the afternoon and evening in the growing seasons.
    1 point
  47. I have no clue, which AW clone this is, but it's certainly neither clone 5 nor clone T which are the two only clones I sold in the last 4 or 5 years. It would also help if you would stop calling a plant of N. macrophylla _the_ "AW" clone. I have several clones in vitro, two of which are currently sold (5 and T). The rest are backups that are not in propagation. Both of these come close to the picture posted by Wiser. Clone T is more compact and 5 grows quicker and bigger but with both of them I see no traces of N. lowii. Further, if you say that the plants of Thomas Carow are the real thing while mine are not, this is most ridiculous, since both come from the same lab. And that's mine....! Andreas
    1 point
  48. Welcome back, Fernando. My G.violacea flowers regularly but, although I have had it for years, my G.sp."giant violacea" finally flowered for the first time this year. The scapes are a lot taller and the flowers bigger. Other Genlisea news... my G.uncinata, which I consider my most stubborn plant ever (which has remained alive at least) has just sat there for several years, usually having a single leaf and a sending up a scape which inevitably dies at around a 6" height. Well, pretty big Genlisea leaf just emerged a few inches away so I think this stubborn plant finally reproduced itself. I'm not certain, but I think I've had it for around 4 years or so... Maybe it's time to take a leaf cutting! Matt
    1 point