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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/17/2021 in Posts

  1. Drosera spatulata is present in large numbers at the mountainous location below in the temperate North Island, New Zealand. As can be seen, they are happy on the exposed moss covered rhyolitic surfaces.
    3 points
  2. Droseara auriculata growing beside major urban motorway in Auckland, New Zealand
    2 points
  3. 2 points
  4. Sorry guys, haven't really got the hang off uploading photos on here let's hope this works...
    2 points
  5. Or you could look into buying RO water from a local aquarium shop. Mine charges 17p/litre, many charge less. Guy
    2 points
  6. Interesting! I am finding capensis, and some of the rosetted ones quite attractive.
    1 point
  7. Not that I am an expert on heliamphora. But as far as I understand the climate on the tepuis it rains a lot more than the plant can hold. If you look at your plant it has a open slit from top down. That is where the water leave the plant when it gets too much. I would think that copy nature would not go wrong? IE filling up until water pours out that slit.
    1 point
  8. It is simple, they will do it naturally as the daytime shortens, usually November/December time for me also (grown indoors on a windowsill) Have fun catching them as they jump once disturbed. People use allsorts but i find a wet cotton bud works quite well when collecting them just gather them from the outside in.
    1 point
  9. November/December for me in sunny Paignton. I've never needed to use any encouragement. Dennis
    1 point
  10. Hi, My profile is out of date. I'm trying to update it but I see the below message when I try to submit it.
    1 point
  11. Things are operational. There were volunteer shortages during COVID and just after. We have a new membership secretary (well, it's Ron once again). He's able to process memberships once a week. Please keep in mind that it can take 21 days for you to receive your membership pack. Also, at present, and historically, our system doesn't send an email confirmation of sign-up. It's the PayPal receipt that acts as confirmation.
    1 point
  12. Hi, Covid permitting it looks like we're a go. Full house of sellers and speakers too Please check out the information on the webpage, the link below goes to the registration page https://carnivora.nl/registrations/?fbclid=IwAR2c-GSQ4FPPqEHKDjBAu4o0Sr9qw0-qsuuKH8_3F4pOSgFnupdt4s0Ojfo
    1 point
  13. Leak test has been passed... now planted filled with 1.1 peat and perlite then about 1.5" from the top 1.1 peat and horticultural sand (that has past the fizz test..)
    1 point
  14. Me too. Can an administrator advise on a remedy for this please?
    1 point
  15. Very nice. I do like the Heli
    1 point
  16. Nice looking plant, GG. You've definitely given it the right conditions to revive from its stay at Home Depot. A steady drop in temperature will be better than moving between warmer and cooler areas. These are pretty hardy, so temperatures below freezing can be tolerated. Best bet is your balcony, assuming you don't have anywhere in your flat which will get cold over winter. Also, if you put it outside while the weather's still good it'll probably find more flies! The problem will be the wind. Perhaps put him in a protected corner of the balcony? Tie his pot onto something? You'll need to use your ingenuity here, as you know your balcony better than anyone else. As to the pigeon poop--do you get a lot on the balcony? Guy
    1 point
  17. A nice video here as well for Humidity, some nice examples and things to consider, all his videos are great -
    1 point
  18. I'm in Oxford and mine are in a south facing conservatory too. Fairly small though. I keep my humidifier at 75% overnight and 60% during the day and it's never turned off. At the moment I go through 2-3 litres a day but I'm sure when the heating goes on it will be more. The tank on mine is a 6.5ltr tank... As far as hard water goes, because my conservatory is used as a living room, I made the decision to use RO water to stop the dried deposits from using my VERY hard tap water from damaging furniture and sofas etc. (Just based on reviews and recommendations really)
    1 point
  19. Depends on the weather. I keep all my neps in a south-facing conservatory which heats up a lot when it is sunny, but stays very cool when it is cloudy. On a hot, sunny day, both humidifiers can drain their 4 litre tanks in a day. With more typical Welsh weather, they can last a week. Incidentally, I've been using fairly hard tapwater in them for over two years with no problems. I just clean the plate with the little brush that came with them every now and then.
    1 point
  20. I used to wait until they looked like they were going to fall from the pods
    1 point
  21. This is the one I eventually bought and it's working really well so far! A bit pricey at just over £70 from Amazon but keeps the humidity at a steady level! Having the warm mist feature is also really handy as sometimes the cool mist can be a bit chilly. I've been using the cool mist at night and the lowest warm mist during the day. It gets through quite a bit of water though (maybe 2-3 litres a day) but I get RO water from Spotless Water at 3.5p a litre so it's not too expensive.
    1 point
  22. Hi, I have mine planted in tall Lechuza pots on metal type stands as I have nowhere to hang mine either... Longton pots fit on these too :)
    1 point
  23. Why should RO unit be out of the question in rental home? I was in rental for years and were using ro. Just connect it to tap, do a big batch that lasts a month or so and then store it away. Brittas filter do not make water softer, hence will do no difference to the plants. Br Magnus
    1 point
  24. My guess is another slackii, maybe from a root growing close to the surface , have to wait and see
    1 point
  25. Near the 'Bory Tucholskie' National Park Drosera intermedia -
    1 point
  26. Thanks Carambola, There are a lot of similar places in northwestern Poland Lycopodiella inundata Krasne lake is a lobelian lake, Littorella uniflora is particularly abundant Littorella uniflora with pine seedlings with Juncus bulbosus Luronium natans Terrestrial form of Littorella uniflora Lycopus europaeus Urticularia
    1 point
  27. Krasne Lake (Nature Reserve near the village Lipczynek, NW Poland) Drosera intermedia Drosera intermedia and Lycopodiella inundata
    1 point
  28. I view hamata as one of the easier "highlanders." People have a tendency to lump its cultivation requirements with the toothy species of Sarawak, but it's dissimilar to these and more adaptive overtime. Although the species does well with high humidity, a moister substrate is much more important as opposed to, say, macrophylla, which is somewhat opposite in its requirements, i.e. high humidity and an airy substrate is typically key. I am growing several hamata at room temperature/humidity and they do well once acclimated. However, as mentioned before, like tentaculata, they like the media a bit wetter (the lamina are somewhat telling of this). Also, N. hamata seems to be one of the species that will readily absorb water through the pitchers, if given the chance, especially when humidity is not very high. I've observed this with five or six genetically distinct individuals and it seems consistent. The pitchers tend to last longer and growth is slightly improved when performed, so I generally recommend it.
    1 point
  29. I have no clue, which AW clone this is, but it's certainly neither clone 5 nor clone T which are the two only clones I sold in the last 4 or 5 years. It would also help if you would stop calling a plant of N. macrophylla _the_ "AW" clone. I have several clones in vitro, two of which are currently sold (5 and T). The rest are backups that are not in propagation. Both of these come close to the picture posted by Wiser. Clone T is more compact and 5 grows quicker and bigger but with both of them I see no traces of N. lowii. Further, if you say that the plants of Thomas Carow are the real thing while mine are not, this is most ridiculous, since both come from the same lab. And that's mine....! Andreas
    1 point
  30. I always recommend UPS with higher plant values, especially to countries I have little or bad experience with postal runtimes. In the past I had cases that plants arrived in Mexico after a few weeks with standard shipping. And of cause we declared live plants! Neither UPS nor our company is in smuggeling business! We run a legal business and of cause do not falsify any declaration! Are you aware what you are asking for....in public??!!! You are asking for criminal acts! We sell live plants, ship live plants and of cause declare live plants. We equip our shipments with legal documents to allow entry into most countries without any problem. The fact that you missed to apply for an import permit is not our fault and I clearly refuse to take responsibility for such an obvious mistake you made. In addition I cannot just take back a shipment once it has been in another country. It would have had to be equipped with phytosanitary documents from Mexico having touched Mexican ground which obviously could not be supplied. The result of a shipment without documents would have been a confiscation in Germany and another EUR 100 waste of transport fees. Would that have helped???? I tried to explain this to you over and over again by eMail and it does not help to start complaining in forums, trying to damage our reputation. BTW, before this incident I never had a complaint about sick or small plants from you.... I'll not comment this any further - sorry. Regards Andreas Wistuba
    1 point
  31. Hello everyone. I was looking through the various care sheets available and noticed one hasn’t been submitted yet regarding Utricularia, so I thought I’d have a go at submitting one myself. All information written below has been taken from personal experience or has been part of the research I’ve done into this interesting plant. Introduction The Utricularia (or “bladderwort”) is the largest group of carnivorous plants with over 200 known varieties currently documented. They get their name from the way they trap their prey: their roots are packed out with tiny, microscopic “bladders” which activate when micro organisms (tiny creepy crawlies) brush against even tinier, more microscopic trigger hairs. This activation leads to the “door” of the bladder opening, creating a vacuum which then sucks in the Utricularia’s prey and ejects any water that may have entered; the “door” then closes and the trap resets. Many varieties of Utricularia regularly produce delicate flowers of varying sizes and colours. Most are very easy to grow and terrestrial varieties are quite happy when placed in any pot, even a tea cup. There are three main varieties of Utricularia: terrestrial (above ground), aquatic (found solely in water) and semi-aquatic (somewhere in-between). This care sheet relates to the care of terrestrial Utricularia. Basic Care Soil Like most carnivorous plants, Terrestrial Utricularia are perfect partners with a potting media made of peat moss, sphagnum and perlite. Other aeration materials such as granite sand works as well. Mine grow in a mixture of peat moss and granite sand at a ratio of 4:1. Light Terrestrial Utricularia are not as fussy when it comes to light as other carnivorous plants. I’d recommend treating their lighting conditions as you would a Dionaea Muscipula, but don’t worry if you find yourself unable to provide as much light. A bright, sunny windowsill will do nicely. Humidity One of the great things about Terrestrial Utricularia is that they have a relatively relaxed opinion on humidity. As long as humidity doesn’t dip below 40% they are quite content. Containers Although not recommended for most carnivorous plants, an undrained container is your Terrestrial Utricularia’s best friend. Even something as simple as a tea cup can be an ideal home for this plant – as long as you repot once they fill their container! Utricularia can have long root systems, so make sure while repotting you check how long the roots are before accidently ripping off part of the root system. I would like to add I’ve lost half the root system on one of my Utricularia (due to other reasons) but the plant is doing very well and has recovered splendidly. Still, be cautious. Water Like all carnivorous plants, pure water is a must. Distilled, deionized, demineralised, reverse osmosis or rain water are perfect for a Terrestrial Utricularia. Keep their soil relatively moist. Some species of Utricularia enjoy an occasional flooding. Recommended beginner’s plants I thought this would be a good section to add for those who wish to try Terrestrial Utricularia for the first time. You can have a look for the plants below at my list of carnivorous plant suppliers. Utricularia Sandersonii From South Africa, the Utricularia Sandersonii grows very vigorously. I have one of these and despite losing half its root system it is still thriving. They produce beautiful pale lilac flowers that look like bunnies. The flowers are usually only a few millimetres across, but are large enough to be seen and to be beautiful. They flower freely throughout the year and look wonderful in any room of the house. Grey, FTC Forum Moderator
    1 point
  32. Hi, is this DM Jolly Joker? Or anyone has grown this cultivar? https://www.zonerama.com/Extraordinaryplants/Photo/5344420/229326277
    0 points
  33. Hola estoy buscando la dionaea musci9pula super nova si alguien la tiene se la compro, este es mi correo [email protected], i este mi wasap i tlf605965124
    0 points
  34. Dear All, I haven't been on the forum for a good few years so it is fantastic to see it still going strong! One of my last posts was back in 2008 when I was after some advice on maintaining Sarras in aqueous gel as we were planning to have them for our table centre-pieces. I am happy to report back that both the original plants (sourced direct from Mike King - thank you Mike) and the marriage, are still going strong :) This year one of my sarras has done very well in the polytunnel but I cannot for the life of me remember where it came from or what the variety is - any help would be much appreciated! It has a beautiful double flower as well and the pitchers are very tall and slender. Good to be back and many thanks in advance for any id help :) Camilla
    0 points
  35. Think I should travel to NZ next year for my 50th if I'm allowed
    0 points
  36. I have fresh seeds not from alata but from bahiensis . I have also fresh seeds from contrajerva have you others dorstenia? jeff
    0 points