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  1. Near the 'Bory Tucholskie' National Park Drosera intermedia -
    2 points
  2. Hi Damiano, sorry, your Darlingtonia looks dead. It will not recover if the rhizome is completely brown even if the pitcher tips are still green. You could cut the rhizome to remove all brown parts until you get to the whitish/green part, but probably it is too late now and nothing wil be left. Darlingtonia rots easily if the substrate gets too hot or if the plant got too hot during shipment. Next time: Find a spot with good sun in the moroning and avoid direct sun after noon. Darlingtonia likes a lot of light as long as it is cool but it will live happily in semi shade when it gets
    2 points
  3. What I would suggest (that is until I read your care notes ) is to place a plastic bag over the plant and pot to increase humidity. This seems to help dew production. If the plant recovers slowly allow more natural air into the bag by cutting off the corners. Do this gradually over a few days or weeks. Good luck.
    1 point
  4. Hello! I have found a lot of butterworts in Alps (Switzerland) and I am thinking if it is P. vulgaris or P. leptoceras. Maybe somebody can identify this plant?
    1 point
  5. 1 year later... and you are posting nonsense bullshit
    1 point
  6. Must have been peat based compost
    1 point
  7. I really have fun growing 'Squat'
    1 point
  8. in the weekend of the 9th and 10th of October Carnivora will host an EEE! Well, unless the rules relating to the COVID situation change of course. The Botanical garden in Leiden has agreed to host this weekend, so great location... check! As we are all dying to get a descent event on the menu again let's keep our fingers crossed that the sailing is smooth. More details will follow as they develop.
    1 point
  9. My open day this year is planned for Sat 3rd July 2021. 12-5. All welcome. Plants for sale and refreshments available.
    1 point
  10. Cephalotus 'Bananito' is seedgrown C. 'Eden Black" x self. The clone has unusual tall, slim and quite elongated pitchers in the adult pitchers... Cephalotus 'Bananito' left versus its parent C. 'Eden Black' right
    1 point
  11. Yes, it reminds me of the shape of a boot
    1 point
  12. The leaves of Drosera anglica are generally substantially longer than those of Drosera intermedia. That said, if they're all growing in the same area, there are bound to be lots of hybrids, too (and even Drosera anglica itself is thought to originate from a hybrid between Drosera rotundifolia and Drosera linearis - which is itself yet another lookalike). Here's an image to show the difference:
    1 point
  13. Krasne Lake (Nature Reserve near the village Lipczynek, NW Poland) Drosera intermedia Drosera intermedia and Lycopodiella inundata
    1 point
  14. Nice pics!! It looks like G.flexuosa to me. But see the thread in the link below for more info: http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=44386 If you're interested in a copy of the paper describing G.flexuosa, shoot me a private message with your email address. Best wishes, Fernando P.S. I'll try to copy/paste a key from this paper to help you ID your plant: ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- A key to the species of Genlisea subgenus Tayloria 0. Capsule opening with bivalvate dehiscence, corolla lilac, lavender or white, spur diver
    1 point
  15. Here are some microscope shots of my Genlisea... I find it hard to take these pictures because the outer cells have air pockets that reflect a lot of the light. It's like trying to take a picture through bubblewrap. Subterranean leaf. A stalk gland seems to seal the trap above and below the opening. A view of the stalk gland. External stalk gland. I always see a lot of stuff stuck to them. Another group of stalk glands. The tube between the leaf and the bulb of the plant. Typical Genlisea prey in the bulb.
    1 point
  16. Hello Abacus, Very nice microscope photographs! You can get over the reflection of air-bubbles in the outer epidermis of the leaf, if you either fix your fresh traps in alcohol for a few hours (and then make the slide using alcohol not water), or if you use fresh material in lactic acid, not water. The sencond photo that you labelled "stalked gland" shows almost every anatomical feature of the apical part of a Genlisea trap. You can see the short retentive hairs ("teeth"), the longer retentive hairs on the left, the red round thing in the middle is a prey item (most likely a mite), and thes
    1 point
  17. Mine has self-seeded into other utric pots nearby in the greenhouse. I only just noticed this as the first genlisea flower spikes are now opening in a pot of U. dichotoma. It doesn't need much heat. Winter min has been 2-3C for the last few years and it flowers like a trooper.
    1 point
  18. Hola Sebas! This phenomenon you observed with Genlisea is probably similar to that known from several cliff-hanging Pinguicula species, but I believe this similarity is only physiological and not ecological. While some Pinguicula will bend their scapes backwards in order to place their seed capsules close to the walls they cling to (thus avoiding that most seeds fall on the ground below), in species of the G.violacea group (section Tayloria) the pedicels (the "stem" that holds up the flower, branching from the main flower scape) are the ones that bend. G.violacea, G.lobata, etc. will bend
    1 point
  19. To all, It is very difficult to keep any such information constantly updates with all the recent literature and collections. For example G.filiformis was recently collected in S Mexico, extending the range of this species (and genus!) into N America. So it is very difficult to have such a site 100% correct and one must often consult various pages, such as the CP Database put up by Jan Schaluer, which is also very comprehensive. Congrats Matthias and all! Fernando Rivadavia
    1 point
  20. Here's the article (I'm not sure if it's teh final version though...) ----------------------------------------- Genlisea aurea St.Hil. Genlisea aurea St.Hil. (Lentibulariaceae) was discovered and described by the French botanist Auguste de Saint Hilaire in the early 19th century (St.Hil., 1833). This species is endemic to Brazil, where it is widespread on sandstone highlands from the states of Mato Grosso in the west to Bahia in the northeast to Santa Catarina in the southeast (Fromm-Trinta, 1979). This Genlisea species is a perennial herb typically found at altitudes varying from 550m
    1 point
  21. My friend Gert from Hollland took some back with him during our trip to Venezuela in August 2003. We saw tons of this beautiful species. Hopefully he still has some alive... Take care, Fernando Rivadavia
    1 point
  22. Welcome back, Fernando. My G.violacea flowers regularly but, although I have had it for years, my G.sp."giant violacea" finally flowered for the first time this year. The scapes are a lot taller and the flowers bigger. Other Genlisea news... my G.uncinata, which I consider my most stubborn plant ever (which has remained alive at least) has just sat there for several years, usually having a single leaf and a sending up a scape which inevitably dies at around a 6" height. Well, pretty big Genlisea leaf just emerged a few inches away so I think this stubborn plant finally reproduced itself. I
    1 point
  23. Anyone else growing this one?
    1 point
  24. Hi Tim, At first the plant I obtained shrunk in size, but it's been a few months now and it appears to have stabilized. I think it will be fine and intend to try to propagate it shortly. If all goes well, I will try to get it into more collections in the near future. Matt
    1 point
  25. Hi What do Cephalotus seeds look like?
    0 points
  26. Venus flytrap is adorable. It would be best if you tried adding several fertilizers in March or late February. But the best time to feed soil is indeed in spring. Pruning the plant is also a crucial step; in order for the flower to keep a bushy shape. I’d also like to add that hard pruning is not needed for this plant. I had a problem lately with blue blossom ceanothus, and I couldn’t grow it properly. But I was lucky enough to find this website https://trimthatweed.com/how-to-grow-blue-blossom-ceanothus/ .That’s where I got all my knowledge, and thanks to them, I was able to grow my plant. I
    0 points
  27. Nessun cefaloto disponibile
    0 points
  28. Cosa Ne pensate di questa dionea?
    0 points
  29. you're right ... but so far it's going well .... I wanted to ask you ..... do you have cephalotus?
    0 points
  30. Hai messo troppa perlite nel tuo substrato
    0 points
  31. Bellissima pianta ...vigorosa con foglie leggermente allungate con ascidi cravattone e peristoma molto simili agli hummers le fasi di crescita da novembre 2020 a giugno 2021
    0 points
  32. cosa si sa del ragazzo grande cefaloto? .....ne ho visti tanti in giro anche da rivenditori famosi ma nessuno è veramente grande rispetto al mio...
    0 points
  33. Or use a pressure washer.
    0 points