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  1. Hi, A few quick shots by my mobile before moving them to new growing area: N. rajah and N. peltata N. hamata and N. deaniana Again N. deaniana, N. chaniana and N. burbidgeae
    4 points
  2. Hi all, the same procedure as every year: My plants of U. menziesii showing first flowers after division and repotting. In the german cp society GFP i have posted a complete manual of this beautiful species.... best regards Tobias
    4 points
  3. 4 points
  4. Dionaea Pink panther (Half of 2018)
    3 points
  5. 2007 purchased from Hampshire Carnivorous plants as a semi-mature plant (probable origin Borneo Exotics) Lower pitchers in 2022 after travelling to Cornwall and then to Germany (between 2010 and 2011) Intermediate pitcher 2022 Top view 2022 Upper pitcher 2022
    3 points
  6. Drosera cistiflora 2022:
    3 points
  7. Some of my seedlings. This shows a fair example but by no means all, of the diversity of markings that occur in the genus.
    2 points
  8. Just a few random groups in a lagoon as they're looking quite good at present.
    2 points
  9. Hi everyone To align with recommended security practices, we'll be changing the login method for the CPUK forum on 1st June 2022. Currently you login using your display name. From 1st June, you'll be asked to login using your registered email address instead. This makes it a bit harder for malicious actors to compromise accounts, since the emails associated with valid accounts aren't public information. This won't cause any other changes to your CPUK account. Your existing password etc. will still be valid.
    2 points
  10. you still alive then Fred?
    2 points
  11. Nepenthes khasiana Nepenthes inermis Nepenthes boschiana
    2 points
  12. Hi folks A quick introduction. I'm Dave, and I've recently taken over the role of Internet Officer for the Carnivorous Plant Society. That comes with responsibility for managing the CPUK Forum as well as the CPS website and various other bits and pieces. I haven't previously been an active member of this forum although I have referred to it for cultivation advice from time to time. I do have some experience looking after other forums and I'll do my best to keep this one in good shape. The Society has been through a bit of a rough patch over the past few years. I'm one of a number of new members of the Management Committee who are working to get things back into smooth operation and to provide a better experience for the Society's members. CPS members should have received notification of the AGM which is being held at the end of May via Zoom - we'd really appreciate your participation to help us set a positive direction for the Society over the coming year. If you haven't received an invitation, please let me know and I'll look into it. I look forward to supporting your community :)
    2 points
  13. Questo cephalotus è un qualcosa di indescrivibile...... Pronunciato col peristoma,le costole, il cappello.......ha caratteristiche che non hanno altri miei cephalotus
    2 points
  14. Pianta molto vigorosa ,colorazione bellissima ,particolare la bocca stretta , corpo allungato , nato da seme.....tutto da osservare.....molto interessante
    2 points
  15. Hi Jon all the native sundews will be dormant at this time of year and will have reduced greatly in size - as will native butterworts. They will reappear in the Spring. Generally speaking, carnivorous plants are slow to produce mature plants from seed (years in some cases) which is likely to be frustrating for a 5 year old! Please PM me If your son would like some freebie sarracenia (north american pitcher plants). These are also dormant but will return to growth in the Spring. There are some growing guides on the CPS website which offer some good advice. cheers Dennis
    2 points
  16. Hello everyone, this summer I visited this fantastic place in the Italian Alps, you walk a lot but when you arrive it's a real paradise ... The stream that cuts through the valley comes directly from the glacier, and creates these swamps, full of sphagnum, I have looked carefully for sundew but have not seen any... However, there were a lot of pinguicula at the edge of the creek too ...
    2 points
  17. Utricularia livida & dichotoma Utricularia dichotoma
    2 points
  18. Although in full sun and cold this cephalotus remains green.
    2 points
  19. Here is my 1.5 year old drosophyllum. It is about to bloom. I am wondering if it is not too late to for blooming and seed production
    1 point
  20. Cephalotus dalle caratteristiche particolari......rimane piccolo anche da adulto non supera I 2 cm di altezza....... questo particolare clone grazie a un caro amico....è diventato cultivar a tutti gli effetti......e dedicato con affetto a Dimitar Daskalov rimarrà sempre con noi.......
    1 point
  21. Why not just leave it, it must be happy enough to have grown again from the roots. Why chance it by using a fertiliser, it’ll catch its own when it gets bigger it’ll just take time.
    1 point
  22. Hi, for repotting and above all to preserve the plant and my skin, I did this: from a Brico shop I bought corrugated cardboard with which I wrapped the plant by making many layers and keeping them firm and compressed with cloth tape. After this first step, I then wrapped the plant with thick, stiff cardboard and held everything together with duct tape. When all the thorns were safe, I created a mountain of soil on the floor with the help of two pockets of soil and placed the plant on its side on top of the soil. So I took off the old pot and removed the old soil, I put in the new pot, the terracotta and some soil, and getting help because this operation is impossible on its own, we raised, as if it were a lever, the plant and the his pot in an upright position, this was the most difficult moment, I believe that only the plant weighs more than 100 kg, afterwards everything was easier ...... This will surely be the last repotting ... Sorry, I used translate ...
    1 point
  23. Whilst it is always best to find the root cause of an issue and resolve that, changing conditioms too quickly can be detrimental to Cephalotus. Moving one from an inside environment to outside without acclimatisation will almost definitely cause issues. Mold is quite common in Cephalotus and you are right that increasing airflow should help, together with letting the soil moisture levels drop a little. If kept constently wet then this will promote mold, even if the airflow is good.
    1 point
  24. New Nepenthes species with undergrounds traps: https://phytokeys.pensoft.net/article/82872/element/2/15//?fbclid=IwAR0Jymyhn2voRkoPVF2hFaW14KIsDd_7KcIbe8iZ6piuDAnGklfqeg97rzk
    1 point
  25. These are so easy to grow. Mine grow in a west facing window. They sit in a shallow tray of rainwater at all times. They get some afternoon Sun. I'd say stop spraying them. How much BRIGHT light do they get? I would stop messing with them and leave them alone. It may be too late by the look of them right now. Hard to say. Time will tell. You may want to get another one in the meantime. They need bright light to produce dew as well. Lack of dew means not enough light.
    1 point
  26. Nepenthes jamban grown lithophytically along with Rhododendron ‘St Valentine’ mounted on lava rock
    1 point
  27. Dionaea Growers Guide For The Novice Location Venus Fly Traps are temperate plants, not tropical as many people mistakenly assume, and so can be grown outdoors in the summer in most parts of the world including Europe. They require full sun and as much of it as possible, but in hotter regions of the world some shading and added humidity may be needed if it is particularly dry. In cooler parts of the world such as Northern Europe a greenhouse will improve growth, but is not essential. The more sun the Venus Fly Trap gets the better the colouration of the traps. If you are keeping your Fly Trap indoors then a South facing window is best. Remember that on particularly hot days, windows in full sun can be hot enough to burn your plants, even in Northern Europe . So care is needed to provide some ventilation at these times. Potting There are a number of suggested growing mediums into which you can pot your Venus Fly Trap. These include live Sphagnum moss, dead Sphagnum moss, peat moss, mixtures of Perlite or horticultural (silica) sand and peat moss from 30:70 to 50:50 respectively. They obviously all work, but it is difficult to say which works best without a scientifically conducted investigation. If you know of such an investigation I would be interested in a reference. Arguably the most popular medium appears to be a 30:70 mix of Perlite and peat moss, both available from local garden centres. However, you should choose a medium that is easily available to you. You should also consider peat substitutes as peat milling, the main method peat is harvested for horticultural use, is unsustainable, destroying the biological, archaeological and landscape value of peatland. There are too many alternatives to describe in detail here, but the link below should provide all the information you need. CPS article on peat substitutes for carnivorous plants If you are repotting a plant into a larger pot it is a straight forward process. Place some new growing medium into the bottom of the new pot and centre your plant (minus the old pot, but still surrounded by its original growing medium) in the new pot, so that the old surface is about level with the top of the new pot. You then fill in around the sides with new growing medium and soak in water from the base. The process is a little trickier if you are potting bare rooted plants or are splitting a plant that has divided. In these cases you are starting with a rhizome and roots that have none or very little growing medium around them. In this situation the leaves of the Venus Fly Trap have a tendency to bend downwards around the rhizome, making it difficult to plant without burying the leaves. The way I pot bare rooted plants is to first ensure the pot is deep enough to accommodate the full length of the roots. I loosely fill the pot with growing medium. Make a hole in it deep enough to take the roots and wide enough for the rhizome. Then the tricky part is to hold the plant gently at the rhizome in one hand and use the other hand to gather together the leaves and gently bend them back upwards to above the rhizome. Then holding them in that position release the hand holding the rhizome. Lower the plant, root first into the hole until the rhizome is just below the surface. You can use a pencil to push the roots down if they are particularly long. Carefully squeeze in the sides of the hole so the medium surrounds the rhizome and roots. Extra medium can then be added and pressed down the sides of the pot to replace that which was squeezed into the hole. Then spray the surface with water to flatten the medium wash the leaves and ensure the roots are wet. The pot can then be soaked in water from the bottom to ensure all the medium becomes wet. Tip - Medium has a tendency to gradually wash out of the bottom of the pot. To reduce this I use some perlite and plastic netting (the stuff they use to bag oranges in is ideal) cut to fit the bottom of the pot. Place the netting in the bottom of the pot first. I then put a centimetre or two (depending on the size of the pot) of Perlite on top of the netting and my growing medium on top of this. The Perlite reduces the amount of peat washed out and the netting stops the Perlite coming out. Another advantage of following this tip is that the layer of Perlite improves drainage and so prevents stagnation. It also improves aeration in the bottom of the pot, which is thought to encourage healthy root growth. Watering Venus Fly Traps live in nutrient poor soil and have evolved an elaborate mechanism for capturing and obtaining nutrients from small animals instead. As a result their roots are not adapted to normal levels of soil nutrients and can be damaged by them, resulting in the death of the plant over a period of time. Tap water, particularly hard water contains many nutrients as dissolved salts, and other chemicals such as chlorine, that are harmful to Venus Fly Traps. So it is widely accepted that watering with tap water is not a good idea. Most growers use rain water which is free and readily available (particularly in the UK ). More expensive alternatives include distilled water or water purified with a reverse osmosis unit. If you live near a hill or mountain you may be able to get away with stream water, so long as it is close to the source so as not to have picked up anything on its travels. I have done this when I have run out of rain water (very rare in UK ) without any ill effects. If you live in a soft water area you could risk using tap water, which has been left to stand for a few days, as a last resort. However, before doing this on a regular basis I would suggest experimenting first on a single plant over an extended period of time to see if there are any detrimental effects. One way to test how much salts are in your water would be to boil 4 litres in a metal pan until it has all disappeared, and look for a white residue in the bottom (salts). If it has no residue then it should be safe to use on your plants. However, you should still let it stand for a few days to allow volatile substances added during processing such as chlorine to disappear. Pots should be kept in deep trays which should contain about 3 to 5 cm of water in the bottom during the growing season. During the dormancy period you can empty the tray and just keep the growing medium damp. When watering, it is recommended to add the water to the tray not onto the growing medium. Ideal pot type Dormancy The Venus Fly Trap is a perennial plant, and in its natural environment it has a growing season during the summer and a period of dormancy during the winter. For the plant to stay healthy this dormancy needs to occur. How this is achieved will again depend on where you live. If you live in a climate similar to the Carolinas then you do not have to do anything as your Venus Fly Trap will naturally enter dormancy. If you live in a climate that experiences cold winters then your Venus Fly Trap will also enter dormancy naturally. However, if they are kept outdoors then they will need protection from frost. If they are in the ground then they should be covered in some kind of mulch to stop then from freezing. If they are in a pot then they should be put in a greenhouse/cold frame or somewhere such as a garage with a window where it is cool (less than 10 degrees Celsius) but is frost free. If your Venus Fly Trap is kept indoors on a window sill, then it may be too warm here to initiate the dormancy state. Move it to a cool but frost free part of the house with some light, such as a garage or unheated room. If you are in a tropical region then dormancy does not occur naturally as the photoperiod and temperature does not change significantly. In this case the plant has to be tricked into entering dormancy by reducing the amount of light the plant is getting to about 6 hours per day. This is best done gradually over a few weeks. At this point it is recommended that you put your Venus Fly Trap in a refrigerator (not the freezer section), either potted or in a plastic bag, bare rooted and wrapped in moist Sphagnum moss or something similar. Your Venus Fly Trap should undergo a dormancy period of about 4 months, usually November to February inclusive in the northern hemisphere. During this time the growing medium should be just damp but not wet. On bringing it out of dormancy it should be introduced to sunlight gradually so as not to damage the leaves. However, some people do not worry about this as the damaged leaves are quickly replaced by new leaves that adapt to the light as they grow. If you are putting your plant outdoors, be prepared to protect them early on if frost is forecast. Propagation When your Venus Fly Trap is mature it will naturally split, producing as many as 5 smaller plants. These can be separated and potted into individual pots, where each will grow into new adult plant in a much shorter time than a seed would. Take a mature plant that has a number of distinct growing points. Tip upside down and tap the pot and or squeeze the sides until the plant and soil drops out. Dont forget to use the other hand to catch the plant. If it had divided many times the root system should hold everything together. You can wash the soil off the plant if you wish, so that you can clearly see the divisions. The plants can then be gently prised apart. Normally the main thing to remember is not to break of the young plants until they have their own root systems, and are clearly separated from each other. There is an exception to this if you wish to force divisions from the plant. (see later) Pot them up as you would bare rooted plants. Plants produced in this way are natural clones of the parent plant, and are genetically identical to them and each other, possessing all the characteristics of the parent. There is a method to make divisions from a plant that has not yet divided, but this may be risky for the novice. A mature rhizome will elongate as new leaves are produced at the front and old leaves die at the back. Cut the rhizome into sections between where one leaf base meets the next leaf base, ideally ensuring that each section has one or more roots attached. However I have been successful with sections that didnt have any roots. Some of your sections particularly towards the older back part of the rhizome may not have any leaves on them. This doesnt matter as provided they are kept moist and do not get infected they will eventually produce leaves, and also roots if they too are absent. Pot these sections up as you would bare rooted plants. Tip - To reduce infection steralize your blade in a flame before use. Also plant sections into live sphagnum moss instead of peat, as it has natural antiseptic properties. Not really necessary with sections with leaves and roots but may improve the success rate of sections without leaves and roots, that take longer to establish. Another way to get clones from your parent plant it to take leaf ‘pullings'. It is recommended that you take leaf ‘pullings' from healthy adult plants, as an unhealthy or young plant may not take the shock. Take a healthy plant and select a leaf on the outside of the rhizome. Gently pull it downwards and out like peeling a banana. Ensure that some white rhizome tissue is at the base. This tissue contains the undifferentiated cells that are capable of dividing to form new plants. Cells from other parts of the leaf have become specialised to carry out a particular function for the plant such as water transport, photosynthesis, protective epidermal layer etc and cannot change back. The trap is then cut or pinched off and discarded. The leaf is laid flat on the surface of some live sphagnum moss with the white end slightly buried. The ‘pulling' should be kept in full sun, and warmth. The moss will create a humid atmosphere around the 'pulling' and protect against microbial attack. Leaf pullings can also be propagated in normal growing medium, and the success rate can be increased by keeping in a humid atmosphere of a terrarium or clear plastic bag. However, you must be careful not to ‘cook' your ‘pulling' by excess heat, that can often result from having plants in terrariums or plastic bags on hot days, particularly in South facing windows. Some growers have had success at propagating Venus Fly Traps simply by snipping of the flower stalks as they grow and planting them upright in the growing medium to a depth of about a centimetre. This is worth trying even if you are a beginner, as your mature Venus Fly Traps will usually start growing a flower stalk each spring, and most growers cut these off anyway as they take a lot of resources from the plant which would otherwise be used to make traps. So you have nothing to loose, unless you really want the flowers to develop for seeds. A more advanced method of producing large amounts of identical Venus Fly Traps relatively quickly is by tissue culture. But this technique is advanced, and beyond the scope of this guide. However, there are many articles on the web about this subject. If you are interested in developing new varieties of Venus Fly Traps, the easiest way to achieve this is by basically letting nature take its course, and allowing flowers to develop on your plants. Pollination of the flowers is the sexual form of reproduction in plants, producing seeds that will grow into new plants with characteristics of both parents and so increasing variation. You can manipulate this process by crossing the plants that you want, in the hope that seeds are produced that will result in plants with characteristics that are highly desirable. For example you may have a red Venus Fly Trap and a Venus Fly Trap with an interesting shaped trap. You may wish to cross these two plants to try and get a plant that is red and has the interesting shaped traps. Warning, this can be a long and laborious process and you may not live long enough to see results. People sometimes collect from wild populations as they are bigger, and so the chances of something interesting arising from cross pollination are increased. Please do not collect from the wild as it is either illegal or carefully regulated.
    1 point
  28. After having given up the seedbank back in July to another member due to severe ill health (which is still extremely bad), it was finally returned to me last week and very quickly got to the new volunteer. However the new volunteer has now returned it within days as decided they did not want to do the role. I am starting to deal with the backlog and aim to get these orders out as soon as possible, however I am having to sort it all out back into a useable format as it has come back in rather a mess to say the least, so took me over 1hour to find 4 individual packets - I had hoped to do the orders before ordering it all but this has proven impossible. I’m hoping to have finished sorting it back into alphabetical order in the next day or two and then I will be getting the outstanding seed orders out - realistically I’m expecting it to take me another day or two to finish organising it. I am also in the process of hunting down new seed, so if anyone has seed for sale please let me know. I am exceptionally sorry to all who have been affected, and please be assured I will not let it affect your new membership year’s entitlement
    1 point
  29. 1 point
  30. and very true ....... mine cost me about 180 € shipped
    1 point
  31. Part 9/9 Finally, the individuals in these photos are clones from some inbredlines which I have been trying to fix the traits. Please compare them with your plants when you have the opportunity to grow KSV and see if there is any difference. https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51859667508_5b2568dd27_c.jpg https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51858629372_641cb44939_c.jpg https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51859683213_ff3d8f0988_c.jpg
    1 point
  32. I have use both extensively. I prefer just neat coir chips these days, but the melcourt works well too, get better rootgrowth in the coir
    1 point
  33. Eden black (origine JJL) Big boy Dudley watt German giant Carnivore giant Eden black (origine JJL) Pascal giant Eden black bouture
    1 point
  34. Hi I have been a member here a few months now, but just lurking in the background. So thought I would say hi and show off my latest project. Hopefully get some constructive criticism off you guys. Main thing is, do you think all plants should survive the winter. Are they hardy enough Thanks Steve
    1 point
  35. 1 point
  36. Hello Premiere this evening 18:00 CET or 17:00 GMT on a vid I made last summer looking for pinguicula vulgaris: If you have nothing else to do, please join me in the chat. If not, the vid will be awailable after the premiere as well. Please let me know what you think. BR Magnus
    1 point
  37. Here are the ones I love most among the carnivorous plants, sundew rotundifolia. A few years ago, when I started, I was looking for seeds of various plants, and a gentleman gave me these seeds; he had inadvertently mixed two different locations (from the Trentino region, Italian Alps) and told me that even if from the point of view of conservation they were not worth nothing more, they still remained valid for a neophyte ... So here are my sundew rotundifolia "Trentino" Just for pleasure, two flowers of drosera capensis typical
    1 point
  38. 1 point
  39. Hello everyone, This Monday me with my friend visited the small bog near the Minsk. Unfortunately, there are only Drosera rotundifolia and nothing more of other carnivorous plants. Seems that they started growing from hibernacula quite recently. They are veeery small and partially are inside the sphagnum moss. General view of the sunny open space of the bog: TDS: And a lot of plants:
    1 point
  40. Last year I sowed my first decent sized Sarracenia seeds batch (21 10x10 cm pots). At the start they didn't grew very well, so at the end of September I thought: "Well, let's put some of them inside and see how big can they became within Spring!". First picture has been taken 24/09/2019, last one is from 16/02/2020.
    1 point
  41. New interesting seedlings ;) Werewolf x werewolf 022 - traps have no trigger hairs so its non carnivorous venus fly trap. Traps have strongly developed lower part, which is also bent upwards. Werewolf x werewolf 014 - shape of plant and traps is similar to werewolf but it have micro teeth
    1 point
  42. i think cp's in the wild come across more nutrients than some think,pure RO or the like contain nothing,most in situ pics i have seen of cp's they grow alongside many other plants that do not have the ability to eat bugs.
    1 point
  43. I know John Hummer very well. I live within a 3 hour drive from him and been to his place many times. John does not grow Cephalotus plants any more. He currently concentrates on Sarr's, VFTs, Bog Flowers and orchids among other types of CPs. Over 20 years ago, I contacted John and purchased a lot of his Hummer Giants and I have been growing and selling them for many years now. In my many years of growing Cephalotus plants, I have come across many people selling the HG that has been falsely labeled as such. If you go to my photobucket: (http://s1006.photobucket.com/user/brewervbch/media/Cephalotus Plants) you will see what a true HG actually looks like. Take note of the center rib. If the center rib on your HG does not flair out like this, most likely you do not have the correct plant. I’m not here to sell plants, but to educate people on what a Hummer Giant looks like. ~Charles
    1 point
  44. It's been awhile since I've posted a fieldtrip report on the forum- actually it has been years. I went away last weekend with a friend and thought that our findings were worthy of uploading. I've searched most of Victoria for CPs and orchids but the eaestern part of the state and the alpine areas are some that I have dedicated little time to. The beauty of these areas is that while most CPs are dormant or have died off in the coastal and lower altitude areas, in the highlands, everything is at its peak in Summer. We headed off late on Friday night to camp at the town of Wulgulmerang. I use the word town loosely as there isn't actually a town there, only a few interspersed farmhouses. We arrived at 4.30 in the morning to be greeted with the acrid smell of smoke emanating from the nearby bushfires in the Bonang area close by. After a couple of hours sleep we headed off towards the Mt. Cobberas region where sub-alpine bogs frequent grassy plains. The first stop was one such plain that I had visited a coule of years back in April. It was a little late in the season then and the Utricularia dichotoma were all but finished even though the area was quite wet. This season, the srea was actually quite dry which affected the numbers of flowering plants, but we still did manage to find plenty of flowers in protected areas. Also found a couple of greenhood orchids (Diplodium decurvum) in the forest surrounding the plain. more to follow.....
    1 point
  45. Just noticed that the tracks that we travelled along during the initial part of the trip and the spot that we camped have all now been closed due to the bushfire activity. Luckily we did this last weekend. The next location involved a trip along a 4x4 track up towards Mt. Cobberas. A tyre was ruptured on this track which caused us to be extra careful and paranoid for the remainder of the trip. Up this track towards Mt. Cobberas an area called "The Playgrounds" can be found. These are plains containing sphagnum bogs with many species of orchid as well as a few CPs. Unfortunately our GPS coordinates did not work our for the orchids but U. dichotoma and D. gracilis were very common in the bogs. with Mt. Cobberas in the background U. dichotoma and D. gracilis growing together in sphagnum. Spiranthes alpicola, oneof the few orchids we did find up there. We checked out a number of other locations whilst on our way to our campsite for the night but only found more of the same. It was good to see that D. gracilis has a much larger range in the montane regions than I had previously thought.
    1 point
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