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  1. Hi all, the same procedure as every year: My plants of U. menziesii showing first flowers after division and repotting. In the german cp society GFP i have posted a complete manual of this beautiful species.... best regards Tobias
    4 points
  2. Droseara auriculata growing beside major urban motorway in Auckland, New Zealand
    4 points
  3. Only some snapshots of todays bests
    4 points
  4. 2007 purchased from Hampshire Carnivorous plants as a semi-mature plant (probable origin Borneo Exotics) Lower pitchers in 2022 after travelling to Cornwall and then to Germany (between 2010 and 2011) Intermediate pitcher 2022 Top view 2022 Upper pitcher 2022
    3 points
  5. Drosera cistiflora 2022:
    3 points
  6. Very interesting Cephalotus germination process I mentioned this post on the following site. https://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?/topic/37940-cephalotus-seed-germination/ Fortunately, I was able to take a picture and would like to share it with you. Dr. Hasebe, who noticed that I was removing the seed coats of some plant species, taught me an interesting literature on the germination of Cephalotus. This article is on a pay site and cannot be accessed. https://www.publish.csiro.au/BT/BT19053 I wanted to share a photo with people like me who couldn't read this document. I have sown Cephalotus many times, but I was unaware of this interesting germination process as I am only half awake at all times. I mentioned Utricularia species in a forum as an exception to plants those roots do not first emerge from seeds. https://www.terraforums.com/forums/threads/how-old-is-too-old.142820/ I have to add Cephalotus to it. https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51333047133_442c94cdac_c.jpg https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51333832245_cf2d3eb1d8_c.jpg https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51333047103_df7f532892_c.jpg https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51669945008_6fbe8e24fa_c.jpg https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51670390504_c8e97d0c21_c.jpg https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51668906507_44a82c7ea3_c.jpg https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51670582395_55719a33bc_c.jpg
    3 points
  7. Drosera spatulata is present in large numbers at the mountainous location below in the temperate North Island, New Zealand. As can be seen, they are happy on the exposed moss covered rhyolitic surfaces.
    3 points
  8. Just a few random groups in a lagoon as they're looking quite good at present.
    2 points
  9. Hi everyone To align with recommended security practices, we'll be changing the login method for the CPUK forum on 1st June 2022. Currently you login using your display name. From 1st June, you'll be asked to login using your registered email address instead. This makes it a bit harder for malicious actors to compromise accounts, since the emails associated with valid accounts aren't public information. This won't cause any other changes to your CPUK account. Your existing password etc. will still be valid.
    2 points
  10. Zaborski Landscape Park
    2 points
  11. you still alive then Fred?
    2 points
  12. Nepenthes khasiana Nepenthes inermis Nepenthes boschiana
    2 points
  13. Hi folks A quick introduction. I'm Dave, and I've recently taken over the role of Internet Officer for the Carnivorous Plant Society. That comes with responsibility for managing the CPUK Forum as well as the CPS website and various other bits and pieces. I haven't previously been an active member of this forum although I have referred to it for cultivation advice from time to time. I do have some experience looking after other forums and I'll do my best to keep this one in good shape. The Society has been through a bit of a rough patch over the past few years. I'm one of a number of new members of the Management Committee who are working to get things back into smooth operation and to provide a better experience for the Society's members. CPS members should have received notification of the AGM which is being held at the end of May via Zoom - we'd really appreciate your participation to help us set a positive direction for the Society over the coming year. If you haven't received an invitation, please let me know and I'll look into it. I look forward to supporting your community :)
    2 points
  14. Questo cephalotus è un qualcosa di indescrivibile...... Pronunciato col peristoma,le costole, il cappello.......ha caratteristiche che non hanno altri miei cephalotus
    2 points
  15. Pianta molto vigorosa ,colorazione bellissima ,particolare la bocca stretta , corpo allungato , nato da seme.....tutto da osservare.....molto interessante
    2 points
  16. Hi Jon all the native sundews will be dormant at this time of year and will have reduced greatly in size - as will native butterworts. They will reappear in the Spring. Generally speaking, carnivorous plants are slow to produce mature plants from seed (years in some cases) which is likely to be frustrating for a 5 year old! Please PM me If your son would like some freebie sarracenia (north american pitcher plants). These are also dormant but will return to growth in the Spring. There are some growing guides on the CPS website which offer some good advice. cheers Dennis
    2 points
  17. Hello everyone, this summer I visited this fantastic place in the Italian Alps, you walk a lot but when you arrive it's a real paradise ... The stream that cuts through the valley comes directly from the glacier, and creates these swamps, full of sphagnum, I have looked carefully for sundew but have not seen any... However, there were a lot of pinguicula at the edge of the creek too ...
    2 points
  18. Utricularia livida & dichotoma Utricularia dichotoma
    2 points
  19. Although in full sun and cold this cephalotus remains green.
    2 points
  20. So this summer I had 5 plants. At the peak of summer I was watering them every 2 days and apparently it wasn't enough because I lost 3 of them. The remaining two plants I watered every day and they survived. My media is mostly mineral so what worked for other growers (ie watering less) didn't work in my conditions. It was interesting to observe that they shrank to almost half their size during the hottest months. Little dew (althought they kept catching) and they lost their upright claw-like form. Then we had a week when there was very strong morning dew (everything looked wet like it had just rained) and they almost doubled in size with big droplets of dew and went right back to their upright form. It was amazing to see how they reacted so positively to morning dew. Here they are now 3 months later.
    2 points
  21. Sorry guys, haven't really got the hang off uploading photos on here let's hope this works...
    2 points
  22. Or you could look into buying RO water from a local aquarium shop. Mine charges 17p/litre, many charge less. Guy
    2 points
  23. Panta dalle straordinarie capacità...di origine sconosciuta....si distingue dagli altri hummers per la grandezza delle foglie nonché gli ascidi molto grandi e di notevole spessore per me il top degli hummers
    1 point
  24. Hi Natale, Nice to have an update about your "little" cactus and see that it is still growing well.
    1 point
  25. A Hoverfly posing on a Delosperma. I don't regard these pollinators as prey for the carnivores. This one was a real poser though.
    1 point
  26. its not botrytis. make sure you remove all dead pitchers promptly
    1 point
  27. very nice. they compliment each other really well.
    1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. I just ordered 12l of dried sphagnum on eBay for £6.69 inc postage. Surely that's not too extreme.
    1 point
  30. As time passes I am dreading the upcoming peak summer month(s) when the night time temps will be consistently too high in this corner of the world. This is always the worst time for me, I much prefer the winter. I've never seen the cold kill a plant (even a D. Capensis) but the heat destroys everything and it gets worse every year... At least it looks like I will be able to collect seed in case they don't make it through the heat. I sincerely hope they make it since I am very fond of them. They both started flowering at the 1 year old mark. The bigger one (with the aluminum foil) is from another grower and even though it's a few months older, it's flowering later, almost a month of difference. Maybe it's from a higher elevation ? Also there seems to be minor differences in flower spikes but I can't say for sure until they have fully formed. I was hoping to cross pollinate them but looks like they either won't overlap or they will but for only a few buds.
    1 point
  31. I thought I would update this very old post with a photo I took of the sick Binata last summer. Not a very flattering photo but it does show that "Fred" is now doing fine :)
    1 point
  32. Era una piccola divisione senza radici....ci sono voluti 3 mesi per farlo ambientare.....mi ha subito stupito la sua facilità nel diventare scuro....
    1 point
  33. It's been working fine today, but when it has been slow I just leave for 5 mins or so and it has usually done something by then.
    1 point
  34. From my personal experience neem oil is very effective as both a preventative of fungus and as a treatment for many fungal diseases and pests in carnivorous plants.
    1 point
  35. Hi Tim Thanks N. northiana (Bau, Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia) - Borneo Exotics clone, plant bought in 2013 Regards, Chris
    1 point
  36. Hi Jon, My Plant that I harvested the Gemmae from and the new growth. Plant is from - https://www.hccarnivorousplants.co.uk/collections/drosera-pygmy-species/products/drosera-scorpioides
    1 point
  37. Here are the ones I love most among the carnivorous plants, sundew rotundifolia. A few years ago, when I started, I was looking for seeds of various plants, and a gentleman gave me these seeds; he had inadvertently mixed two different locations (from the Trentino region, Italian Alps) and told me that even if from the point of view of conservation they were not worth nothing more, they still remained valid for a neophyte ... So here are my sundew rotundifolia "Trentino" Just for pleasure, two flowers of drosera capensis typical
    1 point
  38. Thanks, I wish you success in growing rob x hamata Mine grows very slowly, but pitchers live a long time
    1 point
  39. Hi Jaicen, thank you very much for your help.
    1 point
  40. If the leaves are turning like paper your ping is going into hibernation and will disappear into the compost and produce gemmae (baby pings) and re-imerge next spring.
    1 point
  41. Hi, I have mine planted in tall Lechuza pots on metal type stands as I have nowhere to hang mine either... Longton pots fit on these too :)
    1 point
  42. Hello I have some available but I do not ship to the USA
    1 point
  43. Today I found the time to sort out some more habitat photographs of mine ;). One of my favourite fens (or marl bogs, i.e. a swampy area where nutrient-poor but calcareous water seeps through the ground) is a small protected site between Munich and Rosenheim, in southern Bavaria. In these nutrient poor soils of high pH-values several rare plants grow, including a few CPs. Overview of the marl seepage area, dominated by reed (Phragmites australe). Note the scattered growing rosettes of Pinguicula vulgaris. Interestingly, the plants of P. vulgaris growing at this site have a very pale flower colour, some flowers appear almost pure white with age. Moreover, the leaves of P. vulgaris from this site usually turn dark maroon in late spring/summer when exposed to full sunlight. The rosettes first have a yellowish-green colouration (like usually found in P. vulgaris) in early stage of growth. This colour is kept in plants growing in the shade of taller grasses and sedges. But what makes this location so special to me is the fact that you can find D. anglica growing there, side by side with P. vulgaris! A Drosera growing in alkaline calcareous soil! This ecological feature of D. anglica, that it can tolerate soils of high pH (growing conditions which would kill almost any other Drosera!) can be explained as a heritage it got from one of its parents (you may be familiar with the hybrid origin of autopolyploid D. anglica ;)), namely D. linearis (the only other Drosera I know of that usually grows in alkaline marl soils). However, these marl-bog D. anglica stay much smaller in size than their sisters growing in peaty sphagnum bogs (which is still the preferred habitat of D. anglica). The leaves are smaller, and the lamina is obovate in outline and much shorter than in “typical” D. anglica. The leaves of these fen-growing D. anglica almost look like leaves of D. intermedia! Flower stalks of the “marl-bog-form” of D. anglica are much more stunted than in D. anglica growing in peat bogs, and they are usally only single-flowered (rarely bearing up to 3 flowers). This minute “form” of D. anglica has been first described as “D. anglica var. pusilla” by the botanist A. O. Kihlman from the Kola peninsular of Skandinavia/Russia (interestingly the type is from a sphagum bog!), and was turned into a “D. anglica f. pusilla” by Diels. A new (and superfluous ;)) name, “Drosera kihlmanii” was given to this minute D. anglica by the Russian botanist Sergei Ikonnikov in 2001 (in the Fl. Vostochnoĭ Evropȳ 10, in Russian). For several years, I thought that this small size and other different features would just be ecologically induced by the less appropriate growing conditions for Drosera anglica in the fen bogs. However, plants in cultivation grown from seed (which I was allowed to collect from this site for research purposes) stay that small in size, leaf shape and number of flowers is constantly low, too! Even plants grown in acidic soils, i.e. in milled sphagnum or pure peat, side by side with “typical” D. anglica, stay minute and few-flowered in cultivation! Thus maybe this phenotype is indeed genetically fixed? This would mean that a distinct taxonomic treatment of this diminuitive D. anglica (by using a distinct name on whatever taxonomic level) is probably even reasonable. I personally will choose the original variety rank for this taxon from now on ;). An additional fact that did convince me of D. anglica var. pusilla being really different from D. anglica var. anglica: I discovered “typical” D. anglica in several Alpine marl fens this year! These D. anglica kept their “typical look” (long petioles, long narrowly obovate to oblong lamina, long flower stalks bearing several flowers), although they grew in alkaline soils (identical growing conditions to D. anglica var. pusilla, which I can only confirm from a few marl bogs in SE Bavaria so far). However I admit that more research (and cultivation experiments) will be needed to reveal the true nature of that strange D. anglica var. pusilla ;). But at least I can already exclude any hybrid influence of either D. intermedia or D. rotundifolia! And last but not least, this special fen is famous for some other rare bog plants, like the endangered orchid Liparis loesielii, or some more common plants of alkaline bogs, like Tofieldia calyculata (Melanthiaceae (formerly placed in the lily-family, like almost every monocot ;)). I hope you enjoy... All the best, Andreas
    1 point
  44. I know John Hummer very well. I live within a 3 hour drive from him and been to his place many times. John does not grow Cephalotus plants any more. He currently concentrates on Sarr's, VFTs, Bog Flowers and orchids among other types of CPs. Over 20 years ago, I contacted John and purchased a lot of his Hummer Giants and I have been growing and selling them for many years now. In my many years of growing Cephalotus plants, I have come across many people selling the HG that has been falsely labeled as such. If you go to my photobucket: (http://s1006.photobucket.com/user/brewervbch/media/Cephalotus Plants) you will see what a true HG actually looks like. Take note of the center rib. If the center rib on your HG does not flair out like this, most likely you do not have the correct plant. I’m not here to sell plants, but to educate people on what a Hummer Giant looks like. ~Charles
    1 point
  45. Here are some pictures of a local bog I visited through summer. The site only contains drosera rotundifolia from what I could see. A few shots of the habitat Now onto the plants Hope you all enjoyed it
    1 point
  46. It was earlyish afternoon and we had found what we'd been seeking at Falls Creek within an hour. We had the choice of heading to either a lowland location where we may find some late flowering Utricularia beaugleholei or a detour to visit another alpine mountain, Mt. Buffalo where I knew tht a beautiful deep red late emerging form of Drosera auriculata could be found. We chose Mt. Buffalo as the temps were in the low 40 Cs on at the base of the mountains but a comfortable 27 C on the alps. We arrived mid afternoon and headed for the spot that I believed we would find te D. auriculata. Unfortunately the car would only take us far far before the end of the road n neither of us could realy be bothered walking and sort fo a distance so we aborted that search. On the way there I had noticed some splashes of purple around the margin of Lake Catani. I was confident that these were patches of U. dichotoma. I was right. The inflorescences were very tall compared to the other forms we'd seen the previous day and many more flowers were clustered together. This form appeared very similar to the tuberous form that I had discovered about 10 years ago at a lower altitude. This time I did not think to check for tubers. There was also some variation in flower colour with a pale mauve coloured form quite common. the pale form You'll notice there havn't been many close ups of the Utriularia flowers. This was bcause I wasn't keen on laying in water to get th shots. Call me soft. The final stop at Mt. Buffalo was a small stream that cut under the main road. Alongside the road growing on the rocks were small colony of Drosera gracilis. One of the few chances we'd had to get a clear shot at the plants. From there, 5 hours later we were home. We'd travelled 1400kms and gone as high as 1800m in altitude. It's amazing what you can get done in less than 2 days. We didn't find the orchids that we were hoping, but were more that compensated with the amount of CPs we found at a time of year that most would consider the poorest time of year in this part of the world.
    1 point
  47. I hold mine the year round in my greenhousse ,winter 5° and sometimes lesser whitout any problem,stay allways in 1,5 cm water ,in winter hold damp, cheers Willy
    1 point