Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/17/2020 in Posts

  1. Hello and a happy new year, like every year my U. menziesii are in flower:
    6 points
  2. Hello all, at this link of Italian CP Society website - https://www.aipcnet.it/carnivorous-docs/ - you can find and download, in addition to some interesting Pdf-English version of some articles published on our journal, the following "Special Issues", numbers of our newsletter completely devoted to one subject: - “The Mexican Pinguicula” - by Gabriele Basso - “The Drosera petiolaris complex” - by Maurizio Saroldi - “A tour of the Venezuelan Gran Sabana and some of its Tepuis” -by Andy Smith - “Carnivorous field trip in Abruzzo” – by Gabriele Basso - And the new
    2 points
  3. Cephalotus 'Bananito' is seedgrown C. 'Eden Black" x self. The clone has unusual tall, slim and quite elongated pitchers in the adult pitchers... Cephalotus 'Bananito' left versus its parent C. 'Eden Black' right
    2 points
  4. One of the early wet season Drosera, part of the Petiolaris Complex. Interestingly, in an area about 1 kilometre long by 100 metres wide (between canopied woodland forest and wet season inundated ground) it almost carpeted the ground and was the only Drosera present. Habitat: generally open area with very little or no canopy, soil a sandy loam with lateritic gravel sometimes with scattered larger lateritic rocks.
    2 points
  5. Now that 2020 is ending, only the photos of what I saw remain.
    2 points
  6. Could do with sales being split - one for UK, one for the EU.
    1 point
  7. Hello all, at this link of Italian CP Society website - https://www.aipcnet.it/carnivorous-docs/ - you can find and download, in addition to some interesting Pdf-English version of some articles published on our journal, the following "Special Issues", numbers of our newsletter completely devoted to one subject: - “The Mexican Pinguicula” - by Gabriele Basso - “The Drosera petiolaris complex” - by Maurizio Saroldi - “A tour of the Venezuelan Gran Sabana and some of its Tepuis” -by Andy Smith - “Carnivorous field trip in Abruzzo” – by Gabriele Basso - And the new
    1 point
  8. Here are two sets of photos that may help identification: Drosera tokaiensis Drosera spatulata D. spatulata seems particularly variable with perhaps slightly narrower leaves while tokaiensis seems to have more rounder leaves probably from rotundifolia. Having looked at all the photos carefully, it would appear Darwiniana is probably correct with his tokaiensis suggestion. Kind regards, Rob
    1 point
  9. Just a suggestion. Could it be D. spatulata the spoon-leaved sundew? I am not an expert but those leaves do appear spoon shaped and it appears very similar to my D. spatulata. However, I do know that D. tokaiensis is D. (spatulata x rotundifolia) so there are very clear similarities between tokaiensis and spatulata. Kind regards, Rob
    1 point
  10. That looks like D.tokainensis to me. I don't know any South American Drosera that looks like the one on the photo. With a little imagination, it could look a bit like D.esmeraldae, but I don't think so. D.esmeraldae from the D.capillaris complex is a very small plant with maximum of 2-2.5cm in diameter and is very rare in culture. Almost all available plants or seeds are D.spatulata or something from the D.natalensis complex. I'm going to commit to D.tokainensis. The flower also looks like it. D. spatulata mostly blooms white and not pink. The leaves (lamina) are also more spatulate and
    1 point
  11. H Dan nice to see you back. Welcoome Cheers Steve
    1 point
  12. Sry My english is bad. You need 2 genetic diffrent plants and they have to bloom at the same time. In winter it means cool overwintering. Almost no one has ever managed to get seeds of D.hamiltonii in culture.
    1 point
  13. Looks great! thanks for the detailed write-up!
    1 point
  14. Stapeliads including Huernias can be tricky, too wet they rot, too dry the roots die back after which it can take ages to reroot. I have Huernia zebrina "magniflora" and have found that it grows best in the house rather than greenhouse. It needs a certain amount of shade, I found sunlight in a South facing window was too strong but in a North facing window they will go leggy. South seems ok during late Autumn to Spring. They need a freely draining compost and, although you say your compost is freely draining, I think the peat based mix will be too water retentive. I would use a loam b
    1 point
  15. 1 point
  16. Ok so ive brought a few packets of seeds from him since february. Ihad mixed results during late winter when temps were lower (1 dubia, 1 aristochioides , 0 naga, 12 lavicola germinated) but in march maxima wavy 50%+ , 0 dairi atm etc and now a few from may are germinating with the speed growing rate amount for the latest 4 seemingly accurate. They were flower stalks collected wild by people there then sold to him, I presume they spread some seed in the area and dont poach them. Hes very good with the amount and sometimes throws in bonus seeds if you buy multiple at once. Never had any is
    1 point
  17. The last time I got in to the peat argument here, I was pilloried for it. As a flower show exhibitor I need to be well versed in this argument, especially when faced with a representative of the metropolitan let's drive a Prius and crap in the woods club; those who feel that as long as nothing falls within their own tunnel vision, then they'll save the planet by driving an electric car. Start asking where the electricity comes from, and you can see the tell-tale beads of sweat breaking out across their Nivea softened brows. I don't believe the sale of peat will end. Let's put things into
    1 point
  18. Cephalotus follicularis "Boot form" Its name is due to the curved shape of the pitcher, shaped like a boot Cephalotus which grew alone without input or external purchase. The pitcher is smaller than the cultivar 'Bananito', the central veneer is narrower.
    0 points