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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/01/2020 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    Hi, I like to show you some pics of my tuberous Drosera. D. browniana D. collina D. erythorhiza D. lowriei, giant form D. aff. stolonifera, mini hills form
  2. 1 point
    Last autumn I had a bog installed in the sunniest corner of our south-west facing rear garden. Having been a collector of carnivorous plants for many years this modest-sized bog garden now affords me to develop a more permanent display in the garden. At around 3.5m (long) x 4.2m (at its widest), the total volume of materials required to fill it comprised: 1,600 litres of peat; 400kg of horticultural sand (lime-free, of course), 400 litres of perlite. The compositional mix varies, depending on the intended location of the various plant types. Planting has started this weekend with 25x Darlingtonia californica, 15x Pinguicula grandiflora, 40x Dionaea muscipula with a further 25x butterworts, 35x Venus's flytraps, 65x sundews (including Drosera binata, capensis, rotundifolia, filiformis, tracyii, anglica), and 60x hardy pitcher plants (Sarracenia flava, flava var. maxima, flava var. cupra, flava var. rugelii, flava var. rubricorpora, purpurea purpurea, purpurea venosa and purpurea heterophylla and a few natural hybrids) to be planted later this month. Sympathetic bog plants that are non-invasive will provide shelter to some of the more delicate carnivorous plant species. On the raised railway sleeper platform at the rear, a specially commissioned 1.3m tall pitcher plant sculpture made by a master blacksmith will add year-round interest and a focal point for the winter months. If people are interested in seeing how the project develops, I will be updating this post periodically. Message me if you want details of landscaper, blacksmith and nurseries and stone/growing medium stockists and I'll be happy to share these. Really looking forward to getting this planted and for the summer to roll round!
  3. 1 point
    Hi everyone, Recently I had the opportunity to travel to the USA to see sarracenias in situ. I would love to share some photos with all of you. My First location was Greenville Co. in South Carolina. Thank you very much ! Gustavo
  4. 1 point
    Some pictures of Drosophyllum 'in-situ' Location: Portugal, Mata da Machada and Santiago do Cacém Date:29/12/2019 and 30/12/2019 New Pictures added from Santiago do Cacém, date: 05/01/2020. Best regards, Cumprimentos / best regards, Nelson José Luís Gaspar Associação Portuguesa de Plantas Carnívoras www.appcarnivoras.org forum.appcarnivoras.org twitter.com/appcarnivoras instagram.com/appcarnivoras facebook.com/appcarnivoras facebook.com/groups/appcarnivoras
  5. 1 point
    While hunting around for CP's yesterday I came across a little drama being enacted. A small black ant had walked onto a Byblis aquatica. There was a busy ant trail nearby but none of the other ants came anywhere near the Byblis. Likely this ant had become a little too adventurous and strayed. It was too strong to be easily glued up but looked like its antennae were all gummed up. It could move around on the plant fairly easily but constantly stopped and tried to clean its antennae, without success though. It didn't seem to be able to find its way off the plant. There were a few small insects trapped but the ant paid them no attention. Obviously it wasn't trying to rob some food, at least not at that stage. This afternoon went back to see if the ant had finally got away or had succumbed. Unfortunately I couldn't locate the same plant again.