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    Both are correct in a way. Drosera (and in fact many other plants) quickly turn red if there's enough sunlight as a means to protect against being burned. At this point the plants are most definitely burned, despite the red colour mechanism, because they haven't seen light of such intensity for a long time. These leaves won't produce dew anymore. The new leaves, however, will be adapted to the strong lights, won't burn, but will still look reddish. The red colour goes away again as the light intensity diminishes. Usually, Drosera leaves will be a dark green, with red tentacles. It's all very similar to humans getting a tan to protect against the sunlight. If you stay in the sunlight for too long before your skin has managed to acclimatise (by tanning), you'll get burned.