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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/30/2015 in all areas

  1. Some people like to grow Cephalotus in aerated, well drained soil, containing all sorts of materials. So, I decided to go quite the opposite, planting in an un-drained container (Christmas pudding tub), in pure peat and flooded on a weekly basis. I have been growing it this way since Autumn. I last watered it yesterday and here are pictures of it today.
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  2. Oh so sorry for your lost.... But if rockwool will do the job perhaps ill try something like that too. I now have tiny "wall" just with sphagnum moss (it's about 10cm x 10cm) just to check how my pings are feeling vertically.
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  3. I've shipped quite a few tubes and flasks from the FlytrapStore International to the EU, so it's definitely over there. You should be able to find it in people's collections. Alternatively, you could order one from the store. I've taken all cultures out of stock until the fall, but I still take private orders by request as I have time.
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  4. I've always liked these, U. leptoplectra, the first Utric that ever caught my attention, although it was many years later before I found out what it actually was. It was the shape of the flower that intrigued me. And it's ironic that it grows naturally on my place by the hundreds. I bought this place long after my first encounter with U. leptoplectra, and was unaware it grew here. It's normally the first in the season of the Utrics that are native to my place to flower. Generally the Utrics here flower a bit later in the wet season rather than earlier when the rains first set in. I personally
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  5. During the week, I began working on the left side of the wall, slowly removing all the remaining PIngs. Here's a view of when it was about 1/2 done: And here with all the Pings removed, but still with lots of Utrics (which were under the mesh): Here's a view of some of the plants removed from the wall as well as a tray with leaves (which I hope will make many new babies to repopulate the new walls): I proceeded to pick the Pings clean of their leaves, not only to use them as leaf cuttings, but also because it's easier to replant the Pings when they are reduced to jus
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  6. OK, so last weekend I took down the first of the two panels. It was pretty dry, thus manageable for a single person to carry. Here's the empty wall after I removed the panel. I was happy to see there was no mold and it seemed in perfect condition - probably thanks to the hard plastic sheet we placed behind the sphagnum panel. Here you can see the empty space with just the porous hose irrigation sticking out: I covered my floor with a big plastic sheet and placed the panel flat on the ground, then removed all the remaining Pings, then with scissors started cutting the bird
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  7. Hello everyone, It's been several months since my last update. A lot has happened this year. Most importantly, I accidently killed halfthe plants on the wall by using the wrong insecticide... :-P This is the last full picture I took of the wall back in October 2014: And this is what it looked like in January 2015 after the stupid accident: I was quite bummed and lost several species/ hybrids. But it was probably good timing since the wall needed a make-over sooner rather than later. The Sphangum had decomposed very quickly (due
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