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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/29/2014 in all areas

  1. Hi all, It has been a while since I showed pictures of my set-up, so I have decided to launch this thread. Here we go. Heliamphora tatei {Cerro Huachamachare} : Heliamphora tatei {Cerro Marahuaka} : Heliamphora neblinae {Cerro Neblina} : Heliamphora glabra {Wei Tepui}. I have accidentally broken one growing point recently . I'm going to try my 'highest cutting' ever : Heliamphora purpurascens {Ptari Tepui} : Heliamphora elongata {Karaurin Tepui} : Heliamphora sarracenioides {Ptari Tepui} : Heliamphora minor var. pilosa {Auyan Tepui} : Heliamphora minor "Giant" {Aonda, AuyanTepui} : Heliamphora nutans {Yuruani Tepui} : Utricularia mannii : Utricularia jamesoniana : Deserving a special highlight, as it is currently blooming in my terrarium for the first time, Utricularia campbelliana {Wei Tepui} : More to come : Not really a highland plant, but getting well as I have never been truly successful with this species, Pinguicula planifolia : Cheers Vince
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  2. Hi to all I decided to make a Ping-Wall in mini version, from the two originals Fernando Rivadavia and California Carnivores, Cause I don't have so much space in my graden and I don't have a greenhouse I decide to make small, This was done on May 10 I use the same standard eggcrate light diffuser, with 24 in x 48 in but I divided in three equal parts so I have a Wall with 24 in X 16 in, and I join these three parts with Locking Plastic Strip. _DSC1970.jpg por Pinguicula_RR, en Flickr You can see that I put a pipe to irrigate the panel from above if necessary, set holes every 1 inches for dripping water. Well the first step spread sphagnum over the eggcrate _DSC1981.jpg por Pinguicula_RR, en Flickr Then tie the sphagnum with a steel mesh because I can't find bird nettin, again using Plastic Strips. _DSC1982.jpg por Pinguicula_RR, en Flickr Now fill the holes with Ping mix _DSC1987.jpg por Pinguicula_RR, en Flickr And finally put sphagnum on the other side of the wall, and tie around with fishing line, 0.8mm _DSC1991.jpg por Pinguicula_RR, en Flickr And this is the final product, a mini version of Ping-Wall _DSC1999.jpg por Pinguicula_RR, en Flickr This type of Ping-Wall, because is small you can hang wherever you want, and move from position north or south side face, you can use the two sides of the wall for growing plants Mainly I want to see how they grow in this wall is Pinguicula moctezumae, maybe other Pings but I don't have much plants to put in there, so I start with some seedlings. So I start with these _DSC2002.jpg por Pinguicula_RR, en Flickr Thanks so much Tomorrow I post the advancement of some plants.
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  3. For some time now I have been struggling for room in my greenhouses so I took stock of the space I could make available and decided to purchase a small 6ft x 4ft ( 1.8m x 1.2m) polycarbonate greenhouse. This is intended to house my Darlingtonia and the odd Bryophyte and /or Orchid. One tree had to be felled and my reacquaintance with laying paving slabs and brickwork was required. The result is quite good, the structure being reassuringly solid. Ventilation is via the standard roof vent plus I replaced the bottom polycarbonate sheet in the door with wire mesh ( half the door). For a small greenhouse the staged growing area is quite good. I made staging to cover 20sq ft giving myself an adequate 2ft x 2ft area to stand in. I can stand on both feet at the same time at last. Here's how the plants look at present. I'm looking forward to flowering, some are visible in the photos and many more are to follow.
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  4. My usual potting medium for Venus Flytraps is composed of sphagnum peat moss, silica sand, desalinated coir and some perlite. But Matt Miller of FlytrapCare.com, Joel Garner of JoelsCarnivorousPlants.com, and others have opined that pure long-fiber sphagnum moss ("LFS") encourages more, better and faster growth, and thicker, more healthy roots. Nearly everyone recommends a "high-quality" long-fiber sphagnum moss, although it's a bit obscure what exactly "high quality" means in terms of sphagnum moss. Most recommended is long-fiber sphagnum from New Zealand, and one recommended brand is "Besgrow." My own chief complaints against long-fiber sphagnum moss as the sole ingredient in a potting medium are that it dries too fast (in my arid environment of the U.S. Southwest), and that if kept wet to guard against drying to fast, is saturated and soggy, and promotes fungal and algal growth, and in some cases destructive anerobic bacterial infection. However, I thought I would try another experiment trying to find some way to use long-fiber sphagnum in my environment, with as many plants as I have (a LOT of them) indoors or outdoors. So I ordered a couple bales of the Besgrow brand long-fiber sphagnum moss. In the meantime however, while I'm waiting for my Besgrow brand high-quality New Zealand long-fiber sphagnum moss to arrive, I thought it might be a good idea to start an experiment and comparison between the long-fiber sphagnum I already have, of an unknown brand since I bought it several years ago and the label dried, fell off and was lost, and the medium I normally use for Venus Flytraps, composed of sphagnum peat moss, silica sand, coir and perlite. FIRST, it was necessary to uproot some plants in order to find two that had comparable development. These two (in the picture below) Fine Tooth x Red Venus Flytraps had comparable rhizome development. --- There were minor differences of course. The Flytrap on the right, destined for my preferred peat/sand medium, has a slightly larger diameter rosette and a few more leaves, and the roots are about 2.5 inches longer than the plant on the left (this is not visible in the photo because I cropped the pic just at the bottom of the roots of the plant on the left, to reduce filesize and save bandwidth). But both plants have a robust rhizome with plenty of stored food, so other than those minor differences, the plants are identical. --- NEXT, it was time to make up a sufficient amount of potting medium! On the left (in the picture below) is some carefully moistened long-fiber sphagnum moss (unknown brand or source). On the right, my usual mix of sphagnum peat moss, silica sand, desalinated coir and a little perlite, a very nice mix that is both air- and water-retentive and has a wonderful loose, granular texture. --- --- FINALLY, it was time to carefully pot the plants each in their respective growing medium! Although some people swear by long-fiber sphagnum, this unbiased experiment, carefully planned to be as fair as possible, should help to settle the issue of which medium is better for Venus Flytraps (and other carnivorous plants), and help new growers to decide which to use. Which will it be?! Long-fiber sphagnum? Or the more traditional, time-tested, universally-recommended and acclaimed sphagnum peat moss and silica sand (or sand alternative)?! --- --- OK-- So now both have an equal chance-- Which medium will win?! NOW IT'S JUST A WAITING GAME! ---
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  5. Just thought I would put up a photo of one of my cephalotus that's starting to put up flowers
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  6. Booman's Mutant looks like it has the best of the distinctive characteristics of both Korean Melody Shark and Bart Simpson (Wacky Traps) without the individual disadvantages of both those clones. Neat, Matt. I'm not fond of the "freaks," but this looks like a freak I could like.
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  7. Some flowers of Stylidium Debile which remind me butterflies
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  8. A quick update on flowering, it's going quite well. Not exactly a bumper year but it looks ok to me.
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  9. Nice stylidiums clump! Thanks for sharing! Yesterday i make divisions with my caespitosum. I end with 30+ plants! Stylidium caespitosum by dals009, on Flickr Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
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  10. I have found they can survive quite low temperatures but only as older specimen But can then take a long time to recover and as the growing season in the uk is relatively short it's not worth the risk growing outdoors
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  11. Pokie22 has linked the right auction. Cephalotus clones are obviously a very debated subject on here at the moment, and rightly so, there are rogues that will assure you a typical is actually " something special" if it will increase the price. I try to buy from as reputable sources as I can find, if that means spending a little extra then so be it. I'm assured this division is from one of the first "triffid Albany blacks" that Andy wilkinson sold in this country. I have no reason to doubt this . If the plant turns out to be nothing out of the ordinary in my conditions then it will just form part of my collection along with the others, if it proves prolific and carries the traits then of course I'll want to share the plant with others. Where did your plant come from Dave?
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  12. Hi Tuco, nice pictures, thanks for showing. But are you sure about D. communis, to me all the Drosera look like D. viridis. Sometimes these plants are also reddish, perhaps it depends on the different soil composition. Under my conditions plants grown in dead sphagnum moss are greenish but plants grown in peaty soil tend to be more reddish or even nearly violett. Look here: Best regards, Dani
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  13. Here are another few photos Taken tonight with my phone so maybe not fantastic quality And one with a pound coin to give an idea on pitcher size
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  14. lol Manders That is a good point, Paul. In a similar vein, I asked my wife if she wanted to go to the bookstore and find some Home Renovation and decoration books for ideas and she replied why bother when she can look it up on the internet? So fun trip to the bookstore for a drink and hangout, turned into a from the couch iPad web surf. There is a sadness that it is so much more convenient to google something, rather than build a home library on a topic so you have the information "at your fingertips". Nowadays, I don't even have to spell it right to find what I need.
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  15. Great heli's Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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  16. Hi Shoggoths Well in my Ping wall usually have two sections the lower where the water tend to flow is more wet like the upper seccion where is more dry (this is the same as Fernando's Ping wall), for the plants who need more dry side I put this in the upper secction like P.rotundiflora, P.esseriana, P.agnata, but in the lower section I put more wet plants like P.primuliflora, P.emarginata and some utric sandersonii, when you need to give a rest period to your Pings only you need to water less the entire wall, but at least for know the wall became very dry very quickly about every two or three days I need to wet again the entire wall so the plants who require more dry side is not a problem they produce very well the winter bulb, my Pings who I grow in pots tent to rot very quickly if I put more water and usually I water every 10 -15 days in the rest perior but in the Ping Wall this is not a problem vecause the wall became dry very quickly, and for now I lost only two plants by brown heart desease. Thanks to remind me to post new pictures of my Ping wall. Update This is a picture of May2013 Ping Wall start por Pinguicula_RR, en Flickr This is in September 2013 Ping wall 3 por Pinguicula_RR, en Flickr And these two other are from a few days. Ping Wall 1 por Pinguicula_RR, en Flickr Ping Wall 2 por Pinguicula_RR, en Flickr The plants I have there are: P. moctezumae (about a 20 plants), P.primuliflora, P.esseriana, P.rotundiflora, P.zecheri, P.gigantea, P.emarginata, P.moranensis,P.jaumavensis x moctezumae, P.ibarrae x moranensis, P.agnata x moctezumae, P agnata, U.sandersonii, Two orchids in the upper side and one bromeliad Best Regards RR
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  17. Following photos Heliamphora tatei var. tatei {Cerro Maharuaka} un petit Heliamphora nutans "giant": Utricularia blanchetii "pink flower" Dionaea "black Pearl " dionaea yellow Dionaea "Atlanta" dionaea "triton" Dionaea "005" Dionaea "Schuppenstiel 2" dionaea whale: Pinguicula gigantea f.alba x moctezumae pinguicula grandiflora: After a small Drosophyllum seed:: small zoom drosera filifomis: and finally some catches http://img15.hostingpics.net/pics/309693P4190001.jpg http://img15.hostingpics.net/pics/942970P4200067.jpg http://img15.hostingpics.net/pics/114266P4200052.jpg http://img11.hostingpics.net/pics/374511P4200043.jpg http://img11.hostingpics.net/pics/270640P4200037.jpg http://img11.hostingpics.net/pics/287913P4200010.jpg http://img11.hostingpics.net/pics/915888P4200017.jpg
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  18. Generational knowledge is very useful, i may need to ask my kid how to use windows 8....
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  19. A Pinguicula sp. Guatemala 2000m. Don't know whether this plant has been named. If anyone does, he is welcome to tell about :). Utricularia campbelliana's doing well : Utricularia mannii too :
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  20. Thank you guys :). Just to share a 17 pictures stack of U. campbelliana. I'm quite new with this photography technique, but satisfied enough with the result :) :
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  21. update (30 - May) These are updated photos and progress of some of them , Pingwall1 por Pinguicula_RR, en Flickr Pingwall7 por Pinguicula_RR, en Flickr Pingwall3 por Pinguicula_RR, en Flickr and some leaves start to produce offshoots Pingwall4 por Pinguicula_RR, en Flickr Pingwall5 por Pinguicula_RR, en Flickr I hope in a few months to have a nice Pinguiculas collection there.
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