Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/21/2014 in all areas

  1. before your perspective becomes too narrow, let me remind you something: in Europe and US we spend relatively high prices on these plants, and that's very attractive for SE asian poachers, but most of us also care very much about conservation, so that maybe just a handful of hidden, ashame people buys poached plants and they are not even proud of that. BUT in SE Asia, most growers/forums/communities/facebook don't really care about the poaching thing, poachers are totally free to poach and sell at very low prices, nobody will say anything, it's just something that doesn't hurt their sensibilit
    4 points
  2. After the first layer of sand was laid in the base, the pond liner went on top, followed by another 2 inch layer of sand. Then it took exactly 2 tonne of limestone ballast infilled to within 2 inches of the top of the blocks. This was filled with water and left overnight to test for leaks. Instead of just glanding the overflow pipe into a floppy pond liner, i decided to gland it off into an 8 inch deep 4 inch square tupperware container with some holes drilled in the bottom ! Plenty of marine grade silicone sealant was applied around the pipe gland, fixing screws, and between the tupp
    2 points
  3. The pic from the wild posted with Richard Nun's permission. " This robust plant is growing at Gull Rock in WA." Cephalotus Gull Rock Road In cultivation under my conditions.
    2 points
  4. just to add to the above, I have done a little research and the biggest threat to thrush populations in the uk is the domesticated cat, the biggest threat to toad and frog populations is the domesticated cat, the biggest threat to hedgehog populations is loss of habitat and car tyres, the 2 inverts you mentioned aren't endangered or under threat in any way. i spoke to the rspca and they say that slug pellets pose little to no threat to native wildlife and the biggest impact they have is secondary poisoning to frogs and toads of which I have none anyway so moot point there. I have just spok
    2 points
  5. no jokes I use them everywhere, no frogs toads thrushes or hedgehogs where I live, pigeons rats and cats a plenty, every house for 100 yards has been concreted over and my garden is literally the ONLY garden within 100 yards that contains any plants. as soon as it rains slugs and snails descend on my garden en masse. if I lived in the countryside or had even the slightest element of wildlife around me then I would be more responsible I live in the middle of a sprawling concrete hell with no parks and only 6 trees in sight, never seen a thrush, hedgehog, or toad here and never will as it sta
    2 points
  6. Not sure if you can get it from the photo but this deformed rugelii pitcher looks like a portal into another universe. Just enter and have your mind bent by the dilation of space and time......
    1 point
  7. Cheers. On top of that, i'll be adding 4 x 120 litre open top blue barrels below the staging under the plants (painted black for heat absorption) which will be linked together and fed from the guttering when it rains. The last barrel in line will have an overflow which will just drain into the base. So hopefully with all that water there'll be enough thermal mass to help keep the 3kw heater, hydrofogger, and other electrical gadgets from kicking in too often. I'm not sure exactly how beneficial all this is going to be, as it's a bit of an experiment i suppose. But i'll be keeping a record of n
    1 point
  8. Here is a YouTube link to the story https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MuenicZi3zg&list=UUqbFWAfeuLgn8m81rUL4ghQ
    1 point
  9. all coral can be propagated by taking cuttings, its called fragging, a very small section of coral is fragged from a mother colony and then grown on the artificial reef, coral grows quickly and in a short time they have a new mother colony on the artificial reef, that colony is then fragged creating hundreds more fragments, they are then also grown on the reef until they are of marketable size. one small section the length of your little finger is all that is needed from the wild to create tons upon tons of live coral frags that are sold and in a huge number of cases tonnage of frags are retur
    1 point
  10. to mantrid, I was using the coral trade as an example of what could be done to try and stamp out poaching at no point did I say it was perfect and at no point did I invite you to share your personal opinion which remains only that, your personal opinion, it has no bearing on the realities of the methods of farming and sustainable collection undertaken by responsible legally operating companies. every piece of sps lps invert and piscine life in my tank WAS captive bred or farmed, various multinational companies have gone to massive expense to set up coral and fish farms in these "poor" countr
    1 point
  11. Some new photos of my Drosophyllum Lusitanicum with probably flower to soon :).
    1 point
  12. I use this small portion of my G/h to a multicultural mix of plants that grow with nepenthes, like Amorphophallus, orchids , aristolockia vines, and various others ,
    1 point
  13. Tsk, tsk, tsk, naughty Cephalotus...
    1 point
  14. Couple of them look good, certainly better than some of those named in the CPN in recent times, which frankly would struggle to bring anything of merit to the compost heap. Nigel HC
    1 point