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  1. 4 points
    The Florida Panhandle is one of the world's most important areas for biodiversity. This nine-day trip to the Gulf Coast states of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana and Mississippi was arranged to explore the longleaf pine forests. Historically, these ecosystems once stretched right across the South, nearly unbroken, from Virginia to Florida to Texas. Today less than 5 percent remains of the 90-million acre original system, which included open pine savannas with a lush understory of native grasses and groundcover. These forests host a remarkably diverse plant and animal community that includes some 300 bird and 2,500 plant species. Many of them depend upon a structure that is maintained by a frequent fire cycle (either natural or through managed-burns). Of particular interest, were the bogs and other wetlands that provide a home to carnivorous plant communities. Due to man's unfortunate presence (drainage/land reclamation, development for housing, mining and logging activities) several of the sites may represent the last remnants of these communities. Many of the sites were on stewarded land (e.g. Nature Conservancy) whilst others were not. No detailed location information is provided in this album. Additionally, the trip also provided an opportunity to view wetland birds, insects, reptiles etc. Unfortunately, flash-flooding and heavy rainfall associated with Tropical Storm/Hurricane Barry meant that several hiking trails were closed or impassable in Louisiana and Mississippi. Similarly, by the time I returned to Florida, water levels in Apalachicola National Forest and the prairies towards Gainesville had risen significantly. This meant that further opportunities to view additional sites was unfulfilled.
  2. 3 points
    Hi, I like to show you some pics of my tuberous Drosera. D. browniana D. collina D. erythorhiza D. lowriei, giant form D. aff. stolonifera, mini hills form
  3. 2 points
    Last autumn I had a bog installed in the sunniest corner of our south-west facing rear garden. Having been a collector of carnivorous plants for many years this modest-sized bog garden now affords me to develop a more permanent display in the garden. At around 3.5m (long) x 4.2m (at its widest), the total volume of materials required to fill it comprised: 1,600 litres of peat; 400kg of horticultural sand (lime-free, of course), 400 litres of perlite. The compositional mix varies, depending on the intended location of the various plant types. Planting has started this weekend with 25x Darlingtonia californica, 15x Pinguicula grandiflora, 40x Dionaea muscipula with a further 25x butterworts, 35x Venus's flytraps, 65x sundews (including Drosera binata, capensis, rotundifolia, filiformis, tracyii, anglica), and 60x hardy pitcher plants (Sarracenia flava, flava var. maxima, flava var. cupra, flava var. rugelii, flava var. rubricorpora, purpurea purpurea, purpurea venosa and purpurea heterophylla and a few natural hybrids) to be planted later this month. Sympathetic bog plants that are non-invasive will provide shelter to some of the more delicate carnivorous plant species. On the raised railway sleeper platform at the rear, a specially commissioned 1.3m tall pitcher plant sculpture made by a master blacksmith will add year-round interest and a focal point for the winter months. If people are interested in seeing how the project develops, I will be updating this post periodically. Message me if you want details of landscaper, blacksmith and nurseries and stone/growing medium stockists and I'll be happy to share these. Really looking forward to getting this planted and for the summer to roll round!
  4. 2 points
    Hi all, Just wanted to share this Drosera rotundifolia I found growing on Bodmin moor in the UK. They were once more widespread here, but following a recent expansion of the A30 road, a long strip of the plants were destroyed, along with some bog orchid species. This photo is taken of a population that grows about 200m from the road.
  5. 1 point
    Old plants in gravel mix VS Young plants in 1x1 spagnum and perlite Mix. [emoji2][emoji2] Sendt fra min EVA-L09 med Tapatalk
  6. 1 point
    Less than 100 books left. Two extraordinary population of butterworts are officially introduced. One is already known to members of this forum, other one is printed for the first time.
  7. 1 point
    Here is a photo of root from one of my UC Davis Clone. I call it "super root". I planted this cutting last November. The two huge white branches are about three months old.
  8. 1 point
    THanks a lot for sharing! Wonderful photos... and I appreciate a lot the introduction to the photos
  9. 1 point
    Hi, I took this photo using my new reversing ring for my camera lens.
  10. 1 point
    I've often wondered about effects resulting from road construction. The run off water has motor oil and micro particles of wearing tyres. There's also erosion and sedimentation resulting from the earth works which continues for some time. None of that can't be good for these delicate environments. We need the roads and we need the environment. It's a delicate balancing act.
  11. 1 point
    Interesting, thanks for sharing
  12. 1 point
    Hi all, it has been some time since my last post with photos here. I have moved to a new house two years back, built some new growing spaces, improved my lighting systems... There is still a lot of to do (like a greenhouse), but the plants are currently growing fine, which I would like to share. I have three main growing spaces: grow tent with a 220 W led source, used only for the winter (the plants are otherwise in the garden) and two aquariums rebuilt for the plants, one for helis with 90 W led source and one with led stripes, circa 75 W in total. Hope you will like it. Adam The grow tent: Tray with tuberous sundews D. aberrans D. zonaria D. browniana D. squamosa D. hookeri D. erythrorhiza Among others, D. hilaris looks great this time of the year D. esterhuyseniae And flowering P. immaculata on a calcareous rock The aquarium with heliamphoras, they were recently flowering wildely (the aquarium is usually covered, the cover was removed during taking this photo): And the sundew aquarium. Both aquariums are in the basement and I have currently improved them with a cooling... a hose connected to the ventilation of the basement, which constantly blows cool air from the outside into the aquarium. The temperatures vary very nicely with about 25 °C during the day and slightly below 20 °C during the night. Some of the plants - D. chrysolepis, D. camporupestris, D. magnifica, D. villosa, D. spiralis, D. tomentosa var. glabrata... The succulent leaves of G. roraimensis This D. solaris is going to flower soon (but I have never got any seeds from it) D. meristocaulis - small, but growing D. arenicola D. kaieteurensis And D. hirticalyx - I do not know why, but this species stays always green in my conditions, never getting the deep red as in nature. Does it need so much more light than the other species? Or is it the clone which is in cultivation?
  13. 1 point
    Dormancy can be a state of suspended animation with some clones, not a complete die back.
  14. 1 point
    Hi! Don’t cut anything, it is all ok... do you live in Wales? Why don’t you put outside your plant?
  15. 1 point
    The best schizandra I ever grew I grew in an unheated room in an East facing window, growing in lfs, watered with distilled water enough to keep it nice and damp but not soaking wet. Temps were never higher (and often lower) then 15/16C for the high and about 4C, or a bit lower, for the low, humidity was around 70% to 80%+. Plant went from about a centimeter across when I got it in November to about 15 or 16 centimeters in March when it flowered. Unfortunately, when summer rolled around and the temps went up, it promptly died. .
  16. 1 point
    they are very nice indeed
  17. 1 point
    The only way is if you warm up the glass, because if you have the h-x diagram of the humid air you could see that at 28*C temperature and 80% humidity in the terrarium, if the glass temperature is 23.5*C or less it will surely be foggy. That's why I told you the only way is if you warm it up. The other way is if the terrarium itself is made out of double layer glass with air between the layers (like the modern windows). Best regards Eng. M. Cvetkov