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Pinguicula kondoi [and/or] Pinguicula reticulata


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#1 Joseph Clemens

 
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Posted 16 June 2004 - 21:05 PM

I recently read somewhere, I think it was one of the postcards that there has been some confusion about Pinguicula kondoi and Pinguicula reticulata plants in cultivation. Can anyone help illuminate me as to the current status of this topic?

I am growing plants identified to me as Pinguicula kondoi. I have been distributing them as same. If they were incorrectly identified I would like to be certain so I can make all necessary corrections.

#2 Fernando Rivadavia

 
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Posted 17 June 2004 - 04:02 AM

Hey Joe,

See what I wrote in postcard 11 on Eric Partrat's site:

"As for the differences between P.kondoi and P.reticulata, most people seem to consider the latter a synonym of the former, but according to Jan Schlauer (author of P.reticulata) the real P.kondoi is not in cultivation and has never been found again, what everybody grows and knows is actually P.reticulata."

Take Care,
Fernando

P.S. For more info, take a look at these two links to Eric's site:

http://a-world-of-pi...Postcard_11.htm

http://a-world-of-pi...Postcard_12.htm

#3 vic brown

 
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Posted 02 July 2004 - 10:58 AM

I’m a bit late joining this discussion, I wanted to wait until after I’d had the opportunity to discuss the taxonomy of P. kondoi / reticulata with Jan Schlauer at the ICPS Conference in Lyon last week. I have previously done so with Hans Luhrs at the EEE in Reading last September. I am also familiar with the relevant literature.

I’ll try to summarise my understanding of the situation as simply as I can;

In 1991 Jan Schlauer described a new species, P. reticulata (Der Palmengarten, 55(3):26-29.).

In 1995 Hans Luhrs compared Jan’s description of P. reticulata to herbarium specimens of P. kondoi and concluded that there were many identical features in the floral characters and that P. reticulata should be considered a synonym of P. kondoi (Phytologia, 79(2): 114-122.). The publication of this paper was responsible for the confusion and everyone renaming their P. reticulata plants!

However, (this is the important bit!) Hans did not consult the original type herbarium specimen of P. kondoi (this is in Germany, I think!) when making his comparisons, he used material in the herbarium collections of the Plant Resource Center (LL,TEX) Austin, Texas. According to Jan, this material is of P. reticulata, not of P. kondoi and P. kondoi is only known from one badly described location and has not been found since its original collection.

P. kondoi and P. reticulata are obviously very closely related species and may well prove to be synonymous in the future, but whatever you choose to call the plants we cultivate (according to Jan, both names can be legitimately used, depending on your point of view), it is still a stunning little Mexican Ping!

Isn’t it typical? I delay posting this for a week, waiting for a flower to open to accompany the text and the damn things got deformed lobes!

Pinguicula reticulata/kondoi

Posted Image


Cheers

Vic

#4 Joseph Clemens

 
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Posted 02 July 2004 - 12:54 PM

Still a very attractive Pinguicula.

BTW, Vic what media do you use in growing yours?

#5 vic brown

 
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Posted 02 July 2004 - 13:41 PM

I'm growing them in my general mexican mix, which is very open, free-draining and a bit complex when written!

Seramis/perlite/gritty sand/fine vermiculite/peat/John Innes no2 (a loam-based general purpose potting compost/crushed tufa limestone - 10:4:2:2:1:1:0.5 (proportions approx. not exact!). Increasingly, I'm omitted the peat and adding a little more of the other ingredients.

Link for Seramis; http://www.seramis.co.uk, these little, baked clay granules make up the bulk of my mixes, sometimes I don't bother with the perlite, just add more Seramis. If I start getting low on Seramis (I don't have a local supplier) then the proportion of perlite increases accordingly! :)

Vic

#6 Markus

 
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Posted 02 July 2004 - 14:01 PM

Hi Vic,

thanks for clearing up the confusion about P. kondoi/reticulata.
I'm not sure why but this species is a bit tricky in my care. Do your plant grow at a bright sight in your conservatory?

Cheers,
Markus

#7 vic brown

 
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Posted 02 July 2004 - 14:21 PM

Markus,

I grow it in fairly bright, natural light, but shaded during the middle of the day in summer. My Conservatory is fitted with blinds in the roof, (nice, but expensive German ones! :) ) which can be positioned to shade any area of my growth space, these reduce the light by about 50% (not sure exactly, as I've never measured it, I should borrow a light meter from someone). They don't stop the light when the sun is low and coming through the sides in the late afternoon and evening though. During a cloudy day like today, I don't shade and when I go on holiday they are fully applied, quite a versitile system and with the lack of roof ventilation in the Conservatory, essential to help keep the temperatures down on hot days.

When I first received my plant in the post, it arrived as 20+ separate leaves! However, these soon grow into 20+ plants, many of which I've swapped or sold. :) Whilst the plants grow well in my care, it's taken over 2 years to get one to flower, hence the annoyance at the deformed lobes on my first flower!

Vic

#8 Joseph Clemens

 
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Posted 02 July 2004 - 16:26 PM

. . . When I first received my plant in the post, it arrived as 20+ separate leaves! However, these soon grow into 20+ plants, many of which I've swapped or sold. :) Whilst the plants grow well in my care, it's taken over 2 years to get one to flower, hence the annoyance at the deformed lobes on my first flower!

Vic


Vic,

I too see the same behaviour. Of all the Mexican species I grow Pinguicula kondoi/reticulata seems to be most designed for natural vegetative auto-propagation. Whenever I am transplanting one and remove the media from the meager root system I nearly always discover that I now have a pile of individual leaves, down to the tiniest ones. The leaves, though usually quite thick and substantial at their distal end, quickly narrow and elongate towards their attachment point to the stem. Apparently when they are no longer supported by the media/substrate they easily detach from the stem and subsequently initiate adventitious buds which grow into additional plants.

I also have noticed a general reluctance to bloom. Perhaps another grower of this excellent species has discovered a technique to more readily induce blooming.

#9 CP2k

 
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Posted 02 July 2004 - 19:27 PM

Hi Joseph,

If you use a natural photoperiod, this plant should not have any problems blooming. A couple of my pings refuse to bloom in a terrarium under growlights, but they bloom easily outside.

#10 Markus

 
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Posted 02 July 2004 - 21:10 PM

Vic,

thanks for your quite detailed description. That's funny, the same thing happend with my plant, too. Instead of the original plant I grow now several tiny plantlets.
I used to grow my Pings under artificial lights but placed most of them at a windowsill with bright light only in the morning and the results are even better though the sun is very rare in Germany.

I just have noticed that I have confused the words sight and site - but nevertheless you understood me :wink:

Cheers,
Markus
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#11 lucien01700

 
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Posted 09 August 2011 - 17:33 PM

Reticulata ou kondoï

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  • Dianne Salter likes this

#12 Dianne Salter

 
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Posted 09 August 2011 - 20:38 PM

Fab plants and pics! I managed to get hold of a P. kodoi/reticulata and at the moment it is only a little one...... fingers crossed that I will be able to get it bigger :D
Thanks or sharing!

Regard Dianne

#13 Marcus Vieweg

 
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Posted 10 August 2011 - 08:47 AM

Hi Lucien,

for me this is neither P. reticulata nor P. kondoi. Maybe a Hybrid? The real deal looks quite different for me.
The leafs are to thin and totally covered by drops, which is not typical for P. reticulata/kondoi.

So maybe I'm wrong but my plants look totally different!

Regards Marcus

#14 lucien01700

 
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Posted 11 August 2011 - 19:52 PM

Hi Lucien,

for me this is neither P. reticulata nor P. kondoi. Maybe a Hybrid? The real deal looks quite different for me.
The leafs are to thin and totally covered by drops, which is not typical for P. reticulata/kondoi.

So maybe I'm wrong but my plants look totally different!

Regards Marcus


thank you Marcus

#15 Dave Evans

 
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Posted 29 November 2011 - 06:40 AM

thank you Marcus

Dear Markus,

I agree, but perhaps those plants are still a bit small to look "normal"? I've gotten bogus P. reticulata before, but it turned out to be the hybrid P. reticulata * P. rotundiflora to my eye.

I did get the real deal and it used to be one of the more difficult species in my collection. But now I give them soil with a little time release fertilizer and they're growing quite nicely and flowering regularly now.