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Fungal treatment for VFT


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#1 Marcia

 
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Posted 17 July 2012 - 11:17 AM

You all must be getting so sick of all my questions by now :)

One of my seeds has started developing what looks like a grey/whiteish colour fuzz on one end. Is there a fungal spray that can be safely used to kill it without harming the plant?

#2 billynomates666

 
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Posted 17 July 2012 - 13:25 PM

Sounds like the dreaded botrytis, if so the prognosis is not good.

Any preferably systemic fungal spray, preferably without copper in will do the job on fungus, but if it is botrytis carefully cut off the affected bits, treat with flowers of sulphur and burn the affected bits. Be careful not to move the diseased bits around too much, that will spread the spores and make things a lot worse. Then give the plant plenty of ventilation, it hates good airflow, perhaps put it outside for a week or so if possible and see how it responds. Others I have heard have had success with scorching it off with a blowtorch, but this obviously requires care and a 'feel' for how long to expose the area to heat for.


These days you cant get a chemical botrytis cure I'm afraid, a lot of growers are trying Trichoderma, as a preventative, but evidence for its efficacy remains anecdotal.

Cheers
Steve

#3 FlytrapRanch

 
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Posted 17 July 2012 - 14:00 PM

There are several possibilities-- There are fine root hairs on the emerging root of a Venus Flytrap seedling that might be mistaken (by one unfamiliar with germinating Venus Flytraps) as a fungal infection. -- If there really is a fungal growth, it could indicate that the growing medium surface is being kept a little too wet and with not enough air movement over the surface, both of which encourage the buildup of fungal spores and fungal infection. Brief exposure to direct sunlight and moving fresh air, until the growing medium surface has dried from wet to moist, can disinfect to a degree and make the growing medium surface inhospitable to fungi, but any covering over the seedling or germinating container must be removed in full sun to eliminate dangerous rapid heat buildup -- A fungicide that contains chlorothalonil is effective, although fungicides are by their nature herbicides, so care should be taken not to use so much it damages the tiny plant as it germinates and grows.

Good luck.

Edited by xscd, 17 July 2012 - 14:03 PM.


#4 Marcia

 
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Posted 17 July 2012 - 14:33 PM

The seeds were only sown 8 days ago so i don't think they would be germinating yet. They have recieved plenty of sunlight (as much as i can give them) and air flow so far, also the medium is definately moist and not wet.

I would try and get a photo but my camera isn't that good to photograph such small seeds.

The possible fungus is only present on the tip of the seeds, where the roots would emerge.

Because i am a novice with this, i don't really want to try and cut off the infected area or use a blowtorch, my hands are not very steady for that.

#5 FlytrapRanch

 
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Posted 17 July 2012 - 14:52 PM

If the seeds have not germinated yet, then you might try keeping them out of direct sunlight until most have germinated, since sunlight can overheat the black seeds and possibly encourage fungal growth if conditions are moist enough.

You might try to find a suitable fungicide. I rarely need it, but when I do need to use a fungicide, it seems like one with the active ingredient chlorothalonil works fairly well for a wide variety of fungal growths.

The shiny black shell of Venus Flytrap seed is tough but thin and brittle. When the seeds are shipped, the seed coat can often be cracked or crushed (in postal sorting machines, for example) making them more susceptible to fungal infection. The germination rate also suffers because of this damage. So care should be taken when shipping Dionaea seeds.

At any rate, good luck with your germination project. :smile:

Edited by xscd, 17 July 2012 - 15:46 PM.


#6 Marcia

 
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Posted 17 July 2012 - 14:55 PM

Can you suggest any product names?

#7 FlytrapRanch

 
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Posted 17 July 2012 - 15:09 PM

Can you suggest any product names?

I live in the United States, where fungicides containing chlorothalonil are distributed under several different brand or trade names, including Daconil, the fungicide I use.

Edited by xscd, 17 July 2012 - 15:51 PM.


#8 Marcia

 
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Posted 17 July 2012 - 15:19 PM

I'm sure there is a simular product over here :)

#9 jimscott

 
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Posted 17 July 2012 - 15:32 PM

Maybe this will help:

http://uk.shopping.c...e/products?sb=1

http://uk.go4worldbu...l-suppliers.asp


Edited by jimscott, 17 July 2012 - 15:34 PM.

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#10 Marcia

 
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Posted 18 July 2012 - 19:56 PM

Starting today, i've moved them to a much more ventillated area (outside) and would you believe i actually had about 4 hours of sun this afternoon so the seeds picked up a bit of that too. I hope this might help them.

I've been carefully checking the seeds, it's so difficult to see them amongst the soil, it looks like out of 21 seeds in total, only 3 or 4 have this mould on them.

#11 Trev

 
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Posted 19 July 2012 - 12:37 PM

I've never found a fungicide for sale that actually works. Sterilize the peat before sowing and keep them covered with a humidity dome so mould spores aren't constantly falling on them - works for me.