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Typical with nice big pitchers


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#1 Veek

 
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Posted 26 May 2012 - 21:11 PM

Here are some pics from last season from the motherplant from one of my typical clones. As you can see cephalotus doesn't have to be a special clone to make nice pitchers. This plant produced the biggest pitchers of last season I am curious to see what it'll do this season.

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Enjoy them.
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#2 sojapat

 
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Posted 26 May 2012 - 21:56 PM

Very nice plant .. do you feed your cephalotus?

#3 Richard Bunn

 
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Posted 26 May 2012 - 22:36 PM

Wow, I wish mine looked like that.

#4 Ewoud

 
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Posted 27 May 2012 - 14:32 PM

Very nice! The mine are little bit smaller :P
Do you put them into the full sun or behind a window?

Edited by Ewoud, 27 May 2012 - 14:33 PM.


#5 Veek

 
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Posted 27 May 2012 - 14:34 PM

Nop I don't feed them. This one I put in my parents garden when the temperatures allow it in Belgium. They eat whatever they catch theirselves. :-) I've been thinking about feeding them but I am not sure about how and what.

#6 Ewoud

 
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Posted 27 May 2012 - 14:36 PM

Haha, oke, thx
And the weather in Belgium... Yeah, sometimes strange ;)

#7 Richard Bunn

 
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Posted 27 May 2012 - 15:21 PM

Regarding feeding; I was just going through Peter D'Amato's book The Savage Garden making a note of all the foliar feed details for different genera. What he says for Cephalotus is spray once a month with full strength orchid fertiliser.

BUT looking in another section of the book the orchid fertiliser he recommends (in the Darlingtonia entry) has a strength of NPK 20:10:10. So it must be one with a higher nitrogen level obviously.

I have two orchid fertilisers (funnily enough, for orchids :)) both of them far weaker than this formula. My Baby Bio one is a quarter strength of the nitrogen level and less of the P & K (which I assume doesn't matter as much, certainly not the K).

I assume I can just quadruple the strength of the dose. So, my advice is to see what kinds of orchid fertiliser (it has no urea) you can obtain and check the NPK ratio on the label and take it from there.

Edited by Richard Bunn, 27 May 2012 - 15:31 PM.


#8 Devon.B

 
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Posted 27 May 2012 - 15:34 PM

Very nice cephalotus!

#9 tim c

 
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Posted 27 May 2012 - 17:48 PM

Very nice Koen.
:on_the_quiet:

#10 Veek

 
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Posted 27 May 2012 - 19:49 PM

Regarding feeding; I was just going through Peter D'Amato's book The Savage Garden making a note of all the foliar feed details for different genera. What he says for Cephalotus is spray once a month with full strength orchid fertiliser.

BUT looking in another section of the book the orchid fertiliser he recommends (in the Darlingtonia entry) has a strength of NPK 20:10:10. So it must be one with a higher nitrogen level obviously.

I have two orchid fertilisers (funnily enough, for orchids :)) both of them far weaker than this formula. My Baby Bio one is a quarter strength of the nitrogen level and less of the P & K (which I assume doesn't matter as much, certainly not the K).

I assume I can just quadruple the strength of the dose. So, my advice is to see what kinds of orchid fertiliser (it has no urea) you can obtain and check the NPK ratio on the label and take it from there.


I will look into this. Does anybody has any experience with doing this. It seems a fairly easy way of feeding. An other alternitive is handfeeding them some bugs but that is a big job to do.

#11 Marcus B

 
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Posted 27 May 2012 - 23:34 PM

I will look into this. Does anybody has any experience with doing this. It seems a fairly easy way of feeding. An other alternitive is handfeeding them some bugs but that is a big job to do.


I spray mine with fertilizer made for acid loving plants in a dilute mix. They seem to respond well.

#12 Jozef Havrilcak

 
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Posted 02 June 2012 - 22:53 PM

Veek what clone is it? its nice big family of cephalotus :Laie_98:

Edited by WeXi, 02 June 2012 - 22:53 PM.


#13 Veek

 
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Posted 04 June 2012 - 14:35 PM

I spray mine with fertilizer made for acid loving plants in a dilute mix. They seem to respond well.


I think I'll go experiment a little with orchid fertilizer. Curious to see how it'll go.


@Wexi: this clone I bought several years ago from Marc Verdyck and was my first Cephalotus. It also make my biggest pitchers. I don't think you got this one from me yet.

#14 Jozef Havrilcak

 
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Posted 04 June 2012 - 18:55 PM

still do not have it :( . looks amazing but a nice big pitchers :JC_cupidgirl:
respekt :girl_devil:

#15 dimitar

 
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Posted 24 August 2013 - 05:01 AM

Koen,

is there any chance for an update of this plant with recent pics, of course when u have time mate?

#16 snapperhead51

 
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Posted 24 August 2013 - 05:52 AM

nice ceph's Veek , they look great

#17 FredG

 
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Posted 24 August 2013 - 09:19 AM

Here are some pics from last season from the motherplant from one of my typical clones. As you can see cephalotus doesn't have to be a special clone to make nice pitchers. This plant produced the biggest pitchers of last season I am curious to see what it'll do this season.


I think the main problem here is the use of the term "typical". I don't think such a plant exists. Cephalotus have large variations in pitcher size and vigour. How do you decide what is typical?
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#18 snapperhead51

 
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Posted 25 August 2013 - 00:41 AM

yep agree with Fred, now what is typical ?? posed that question in other thread . but it is good so many are trying to get the ceph in larger numbers and trying for more verity / variations.

#19 Veek

 
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Posted 25 August 2013 - 08:27 AM

I just bought this one like a typical and named it like that. After showing some pics of it to Dimitar he told me to change the naming of this Cephalotus because typical doesn't do it any justice. Since then it is named: C01 Cephalotus Follicularis"Giant form" with uknown origin from Marc Verdyck (2008 Marc Verdyck)

But to answer your question about what is typical ... difficult to answer. All the mediocre ones perhaps. But it takes a while before particular characteristics start to show. When I grew ceph from seed before I labeled it the name from whom I got the seeds. So I got an Cephalotus ADA1 and ADA2 and Cephalotus VL1 to VL17. It's more easy for me this way to know what plant is what instead of naming all of them typical. Maybe this could be a good practice for other people to do as well. We got rid of the word typical and at the same time you now a litlle something about the origins of the seeds.

#20 Malvo

 
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Posted 25 August 2013 - 09:37 AM

Great plant Koen, really gorgeous!!