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Sarracenia stolon


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#1 Loakesy

 
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Posted 19 May 2012 - 16:34 PM

I've often wondered whether it is possible for Sarracenia to propagate by stolon growth, but never found any evidence to back it up. On a few occasions I've seen odd little plantlets crop up in unconnected parts of the pot, but always thought they were just extensions of the rhizome.
Here, however, is a plant that I've ignored for the past few years, simply because it does nothing for me and has been left at the back of the greenhouse. I decided to clean it up a bit today to see if it would redeem itself, when I found this:

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There's clearly a small plantlet attached to what looks like a piece of root, but clearly not part of the rhizome.

#2 Phil Green

 
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Posted 20 May 2012 - 17:36 PM

Andy - whilst it 'might' be possible. Are you sure that isn't just a seedling growing in the same pot ??

#3 Loakesy

 
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Posted 20 May 2012 - 19:36 PM

I guess it's always a possibility, but as I said, it's been tucked away ay the back of the greenhouse on a bottom shelf, and as far as I'm aware no Sarracenia seeds have been near it in years!

#4 meizwang

 
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Posted 21 May 2012 - 05:40 AM

There's clearly a small plantlet attached to what looks like a piece of root, but clearly not part of the rhizome.



I suppose technically you could call it a stolon-this definitely happens! Underground, dormant eyes form etiolated growth points that stretch as far as they can until there's light, and then they form plants.

#5 Loakesy

 
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Posted 21 May 2012 - 08:54 AM

That could be one possible explanation, given that this plant has been tucked away for years!